Potty Training – 5 Steps for Potty Training Success

Potty Training - 5 Steps for Potty Training Success

Being able to wee and poo on the potty is a complex process that can’t be rushed.

Pressure to hurry up and progress with potty training only makes it more stressful and difficult for everyone involved.

Your little one needs to be able to recognise when a wee or poo is coming, to hold on long enough to get to the toilet, to remember where the potty is, and to pull down her pants in time to wee without making a puddle.

She will also need to be able to understand simple instructions or she won’t know what is expected of her or how to tell you she wants to go to the toilet.

There is little evidence to support specific toilet training methods, so your child’s individual readiness is key. Some studies have found toilet training can be expected to be completed early into the third year, and starting too early may only prolong the toilet training period. The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommends parents avoid pushing their child into toilet training.

Potty Training Tips

There are several readiness steps to developing bladder and bowel control:

Potty Training Step #1: Awareness of Wet or Dirty Nappies

Your little one will become aware of having a wet or dirty nappy. This will happen sooner if your toddler is in cloth nappies or the newer type of disposable made especially for toddlers that lets him feel wet before the moisture is drawn into the nappy.

Potty Training Step #2: Realisation of Doing A Wee or Poo

She will realise when she is doing a wee or poo — this usually won’t happen before about twenty months at the earliest but can take up to two and a half years or even later for some children. You can help your tot learn the words to tell you that she is doing wees and poos (if you haven’t already) as you change her nappy.

Potty Training Step #3: Telling You Its Time To Go

He can tell you before he needs to go. On average, toddlers reach this stage between two and three years.

Potty Training Step #4: Controlling Urges To Go

She can control her urges to go so that she is able to ‘hold on’ until she gets to the toilet. This tends to happen from about three years onwards.

Potty Training Step #5: Emotional Readiness

As well as being physically ready to control their bladder and bowels, your child needs to be emotionally ready for toilet learning: regressive stages are normal for toddlers as they work out their place in an ever-changing world and how much they can control it (or not). This can make some little ones want to cling to the security of things they feel comfortable with, and that can include nappies.

If you feel worried that your child is lagging behind, please be reassured that this isn’t a reflection of your child’s intelligence or a sign that he is lazy or dirty, any more than it is due to neglect on your part. Toilet readiness is linked to nervous system development and how your child receives and interprets his body’s messages. While most children show signs that they are ready for toilet learning by the age of three, at least 15 per cent aren’t ready by that age and a small number haven’t mastered the process by the age of four years.

How Will I Know When My Toddler Is Ready For Potty Training?

Your child is generally physically and emotionally ready for toilet learning when:

  • He asserts his independence in other areas by telling you, ‘Me do it!’ and ‘All by myself!’
  • She can pull her pants up and down
  • He can sit on a potty without help
  • She knows what ‘wee’ and ‘poo’ are and can tell you
  • He is curious about what you are doing in the loo (yes, you need to talk about wees and poos, too!)
  • Her nappy is dry for longer periods (at least two hours), showing that she has a good bladder capacity and is developing control
  • She can follow simple instructions —  so she can understand what you want her to do
  • He is aware of ‘weeing’ and ‘pooing’. Some little ones get a faraway look as they stop what they are doing to fill their pants; others may wander off into a corner to poo as though they need a little privacy to concentrate
  • She may tell you that her nappy is dirty or wet after she has finished and wants it changed
  • Then (the final step in readiness), when she is aware that she is about to wee or poo before it happens, you can explain to her that she can use the potty instead of a nappy

Even if your toddler is showing signs that he is ready to be encouraged out of nappies, please be mindful that if he is out of sorts or is experiencing a major upheaval, it is best for you as
well as your child to wait a little longer.

If you have waited until your child is ready, teaching him to use the potty is really quite simple, in theory at least. There will be setbacks along the way (so take wipes and clean clothes when you go out with your newly ‘trained’ toddler), but if you take the approach that potty learning is a bit like any other stage of development, you will get things into a better perspective when you have a puddle (or worse).

After all, when he learnt to walk, you didn’t expect your child to do this without an occasional trip or fall. And you didn’t scold him if he fell over, did you? Your toddler isn’t being naughty if he wets his pants after managing a few dry days, so relax and try to see toilet learning in a similar light.

Remember, it won’t happen overnight, but it will happen.

Meanwhile try these toddler tactics to encourage fuss-free toileting:

  • When your toddler is able to tell you he is wetting or soiling his nappy, suggest, ‘You can wee or poo on the potty or toilet, if you have a child seat), like Mummy and Daddy.’ You might even like to take him to help you choose a potty. Be sure to leave the potty where he has easy access to it and you can keep an eye on him — perhaps in the bathroom with the door open or in the playroom. And dress your toddler in clothes that are easy to remove.
  • Buy your little one some fabulous undies — show them to her and tell her that when she can pee in the toilet she will be really big, then she can wear knickers just like Mummy or her big siblings (and whoever else seems impressive to her, but please don’t shame her by comparing her to her peers). Then, put the undies in the cupboard (there is no pressure) until she decides she wants to try going to the toilet.
  • Some parents find it helps to show their child what to do by using a peeing doll or favourite toy to demonstrate; others simply let their child follow them around — they will anyway, so you may as well make the most of this and tell them what you are doing on the toilet.
  • You may be happy to clear your diary and stay close to home as you make a concerted, consistent effort at encouraging toilet skills for a week or two, or the very thought of being stuck at home could send you potty yourself. If staying home and totally focusing isn’t your style, you have to keep to a schedule for older children, or you work all week outside the home, you can take a slightly slower approach by having the potty around (even perhaps taking it out with you) and waiting for your child to lead the way.
  • If your child is in childcare, discuss what you are doing regarding toilet learning with his carers. They may even have a few good practical tips for you. After all, they will have been through this with lots of other children.
Last Updated: February 25, 2016


International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, Parenting Editor, Author, Infant Massage Instructor & Mum of five

One comment

Leave a Reply

Please note: in order to prevent spam and inappropriate language, all comments are moderated before they appear. We appreciate your patience awaiting approval. BellyBelly receives many comments every day, and we are unable to approve them all as soon as they are posted.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

loaded font roboto