thread: What was the most helpful conception-related book you've read?

  1. #1
    ♥ BellyBelly's Creator ♥
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    Feb 2003
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, Australia
    8,982

    Thumbs up What was the most helpful conception-related book you've read?

    What was the most helpful conception related book that you've read? Why was it so great?

    Are there any you wouldn't recommend?



    Share your essential reading list here!
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children
    Author of Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know
    In 2015 I went Around The World + Kids!
    Forever grateful to my incredible Mod Team

  2. #2
    BellyBelly Member

    May 2009
    west NSW
    462

    Up the Duff, by Kaz Cooke. it was hilarious yet insightful. it went week by week, said what the baby was doing how big it was, and also what the mum should be feeling. it was great!

  3. #3

    Jun 2010
    District Twelve
    8,425

    Gread thread!

    I loved Up the Duff too! (although it is more pregnancy than conception I guess)

    I have an older edition but it was brilliant when I had DD. It is very readable and funny. It doesnt take itself too seriously, as some books do. DD liked looking at the pictures when she was older and they actually became a talking point in the birds and bees chats.

    That said, now I am....ehem...getting on a little bit and have a bit more knowledge about my body and the whole childbirth thing-y (in part thanks to BB!!), I am not sure it is the right book for me. I took Up The Duff out to have a bit of a look when I had my last IVF transfer. I found it was a little basic. Still good, but I felt I needed more. Some topics are given just the briefest of dicussion.

    Right now I am reading Fertility Foods by Jeremy Groll and Lorie Groll. Will let you know what I think when I am finished (I will also let you know if it works!)

    A friend is also sending me the Zita West book - Fertility and Assisted Conception. That's meant to be good. Again, I will let you know!

  4. #4
    Registered User

    Nov 2007
    Southwest Syd
    1,858

    I read lots before conceiving. We thought we would have to do ivf because of DH's chemo treatment (but didn't need to in the end)

    On my bookshelf

    Making Babies- Dr Warwick Carter
    Making babies (personal ivf stories)- Teresa Miller
    Sex at 6pm- Annarosa Berman
    Getting pregnant the hard way- Mikeal Svanstrom (from a mans pov)

    I liked reading real life stories! And of course my biggest help was BB! That's where I found out about charting and mucus and all sorts of things!!

  5. #5
    BellyBelly Member

    Jul 2009
    Riding it out...
    4,959

    I found 'Taking Charge of Your Fertility' by Toni Weschler really good. Easy to read and informative

  6. #6
    BellyBelly Member

    Aug 2008
    Ouiinslano
    5,303

    Planning A Baby - I think it's by Sarah Brewer?
    Stay Fertile Longer - forget who that's by, and have passed it on. Great advice about all manner of aspects.

  7. #7
    ♥ BellyBelly's Creator ♥
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    Feb 2003
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, Australia
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    Just conception books, not pregnancy ones
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children
    Author of Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know
    In 2015 I went Around The World + Kids!
    Forever grateful to my incredible Mod Team

  8. #8
    BellyBelly Life Subscriber

    Nov 2005
    Langwarrin. Victoria
    1,654

    For LTTC'rs "Is my body baby friendly" by Dr. Alan Beers....it's a goldmine of information and new research into fertility issues...gave us the answers we needed to conceive our little miracle.

  9. #9
    BellyBelly Member

    Jun 2010
    597

    Good thread!

    Toni Weschler "Taking Charge of your Fertility" was really good - kind of a bible for charting!

    Zita West "Fertility and Assisted Conception" covers all the basics of ac in an easy to read style. It's pretty lengthy, but a lot of that is recalling previous chapters, so it's good to dip into. She promotes a more holistic approach than many fs including acupuncture and meditation. The book has lots of case studies and good general info about procedures, diet and other factors. I think it's a good starting point for ivf

    Hugh Melnick "The Pregnancy Prescription" is focused on ac. He breaks fs into two groups: 'success oriented' and 'diagnosis oriented', with 'success' being minimum invasive testing (Bt and semen analysis only) before deciding which method of ac (if any) should be used. I guess it's a 'why bother having a lap if hubby's sperm is no good - straight to ivf!' approach. I found this a little hard to accept as I'm someone who likes to have definitive answers for why things don't work, but aside from this it does have good info about different procedures and lots of us pics which (I think) are pretty interesting

    Marilyn Shannon 'Fertility, Cycles and Nutrition' is good for info on how what you eat can affect conception. It's really based on natural conception, but the general principles apply to anyone. It has chapters on endometriosis, pcos, low/hyperthyroid, luteal phase problems and male fertility. Shannon is basically promoting a healthy, balanced diet and includes lots if info about how vitamins and minerals affect us

    Jeremy and Lorie Groll "Fertility Foods" is also about how nutrition affects conception. Their argument is that insulin resistance is one of the major factors in infertility and the way to overcome it is through a low-carb, high-protein diet. To be honest I only skimmed this one as that approach doesn't seem very balanced to me, however after flicking through it again this morning I've decided to take another look - I'll let you know how I go

    Looking forward to seeing what other people recommend!

  10. #10
    BellyBelly Member

    Oct 2005
    Cherry Tree Lane
    1,108

    I loved Jools Oliver- Minus 9 to 1, great read about her ttc journey. I loved reading about how she concieved her girls and it was a pretty honest book too. I could relate to it well.

  11. #11
    BellyBelly Member

    Oct 2006
    Sydney
    4,081

    I found Natural Fertility by Francesca Naish helpful. Mind you, it's the only conception book I read

  12. #12
    Registered User

    Apr 2011
    5

    What to expect before you're expecting - easy to read and very informative.

    It has sections for men to read as well.

  13. #13
    BellyBelly Member

    Apr 2009
    Sydney
    2,350

    I found 'Taking Charge of Your Fertility' by Toni Weschler really good. Easy to read and informative
    Me too.. this book was great

  14. #14
    Registered User

    Feb 2013
    2

    Natural Fertility by Francesca Nash

  15. #15
    Registered User

    Oct 2013
    West Coast of the U.S.
    21

    The most helpful book I've read has been Taking Charge of Your Fertility.

    Why:
    -Insightful information about how a woman's reproductive system works, what the signs of fertility are, and how to interpret them easily.
    -I learned things I didn't know and that many other women didn't know, such as the stages of ovulation and how to tell what is happening when and why it's important.
    -Charts to help you keep record.
    -How to prevent and achieve pregnancy using these signs.
    -Each section had example charts on how those signs can be documented.
    -It's not just a charting reference. It's a full fertility reference with a charting option.

    Mini rant: Every girl should be given this book for their first period (if they're emotionally able to comprehend such a thing) so they can learn what their body is doing and why. It would be empowering to them to understand their bodies. Too many girls are so grossed out by the thought of talking about such a normal and natural function for no reason. And also, they'd definitely read it because tweens are naturally curious about sex and will go so far as to look up "penis" "vagina" and "breasts" in the dictionary so there's no worry that they'd never open it. This would hardly give them the vapors and would open a dialogue between parent and child. My 42 year old friend asked me about cervical mucous today (came up in TTC conversation) and was shocked that EWCM meant ovulation. And she told me "I know I have a vagina and I've been around a while, but ewwwwww" after she read about the different types of cervical mucous. Women shouldn't be grossed out by their nethers!

  16. #16
    Registered User

    Jan 2006
    8,369

    Re: What was the most helpful conception-related book you've read?

    The Impatient Woman's Guide to Getting Pregnant by Jean M Twenge

    An easy read containing lots humour and explains how the body works.
    Includes info on cervical mucus, temperatures and different ovulation predictors.
    Meta-analyses of various different research papers, including the chances of falling (and staying) pregnant.
    An interesting look on gender selection, what works (pre-implantation stuff), what doesn't (Gender Calendars) and what is completely wrong (Shettles).

  17. #17
    Registered User

    Apr 2016
    5

    Re: What was the most helpful conception-related book you've read

    i'm a doctor and book are very helpful in many ways
    but it depends on one's what they get from a book
    and book help me to achieve this position
    and i like this topic and keep discussing it