Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 18 of 33

Thread: Vibration Exercise Machine

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    In the Angelic Realm
    Posts
    1,675

    Default Vibration Exercise Machine

    Does anyone have or know of someone who has a vibration exercise machine?

    Have they lost weight on it?
    Is it as good as they claim?
    Where did they buy it from?

    Thanks


  2. #2

    Default

    Sorry Turkish, not related to your topic - well kinda, but I read on an older thread where you recommended the free diary thing on the calorie king website. I can only find a 7 day free trial, is there something else I am missing?

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    In the Angelic Realm
    Posts
    1,675

    Default

    Calorie King

    this is the website. it shouldn't be a 7 day free trial

  4. #4

    Default

    I haven't heard of whether they're any good or if they actually work, but I saw a lady trialling one in the shops yesterday and her butt was jiggling like crazy. I wouldn't want anyone to see my butt jiggle like that..ever...

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    In the Angelic Realm
    Posts
    1,675

    Default

    LMAO. Well not in public anyway.

    They say 10mins is equivalent to a 1hr workout

  6. #6

    Default

    Wow that would be incredible! Thanks for the link, I was on the american site I think!

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    In the Angelic Realm
    Posts
    1,675

    Default

    My pleasure ausgirl. all part of the service i provide here on BB

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Turkish Delight View Post
    LMAO. Well not in public anyway.

    They say 10mins is equivalent to a 1hr workout
    That makes it sound a bit more appealing (as long as I don't have to be seen in public ) My head is telling me that even though your muscles are moving with the vibrations there isn't really any resistance so I don't know how it would work. Does anyone know how it actually works?

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Rural NSW
    Posts
    6,975

    Default

    Hmmm, I'd be sceptical of vibrating machines. It might increase circulation but it's not making the body do any actual work so how is energy used? Muscles have to move to burn energy... from inside. If you are shaken for 10 mins are you panting? Every 1 hour workout I can think of makes the person breathe quite hard...

    I'm sure Googling would explain things better than I am.

  10. #10

    Default

    Exactly what I was thinking Bath. Doesn't look like it would increase your heart rate at all

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Funky Town, Vic
    Posts
    7,070

    Default

    Vibrations at that level at for that long are just not good for your body.

  12. #12

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    In the Angelic Realm
    Posts
    1,675

    Default

    that's why they have a 10min time out function. So you only do it for 10mins at a time up to twice a day.

    So i guess, i really have to sweat it out

  13. #13

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Rural NSW
    Posts
    6,975

    Default

    Found this article that seems to be without bias: (Most articles were written by the makers of the machines so I don't think are worth reading as they have an agenda to convince you that it works).

    Does Whole Body Vibration Work?
    Soloflex and Power Plate Say Yes. What Does Research Say?


    By Jo Levy, published May 02, 2007





    Vibrating Exercise Machines are on the market. They are being advertised in Arthritis Today. They are becoming very popular due to the many claims. The two most notable on the market are the Soloflex Whole Body Vibration (WBV) Platform and the Power Plate. The companies of course give positive research on these machines. Other research I found does not and I've found mixed reviews. So, what's the deal? Is it good for you or not and does it work?

    First, What is Vibration Exercise?

    Essentially it is mechanical energy oscillations which are transferred to the body as a whole (in contrast to specific body regions), usually through a supporting system such as a seat or platform. The kinds of exposures we are used to include driving automobiles and trucks, and operating industrial vehicles.

    The Claims

    Whenever a company makes claims that sound too good to be true they probably are. Some of the claims made by the above companies are:

    1. Triggers physical improvements much like a moderate weight training workout. We are told that just standing on a vibrating platform will make us sweat.

    2. Will increase flexibility, improved mobility, increase circulation and strength, improve balance, elevate my mood and increase my vitality. All this for only $395 in the case of Soloflex's machine.

    3. I can exercise on these machines with dumbbells. I don't have to though. The low amplitude mechanical vibrations that pulse through my body 28 to 60 times a second do the work to improve circulation, strength, flexibility and balance. (Soloflex's claim)

    4. Twelve minutes two to three times a week can help build muscle and lose fat, as well as alleviate pain and heal injured muscles. (Power Plate's claim)

    Let's talk about the WBV by Soloflex

    The Soloflex WBV Platform weighs about 35 pounds. It measures 40 inches long by 10" wide. The platform is basically a weightlifting bench. There is no maximum weight uses for the Platform. The motor draws about 5 amps which is equal to about a 60 watt bulb. You can figure the motor to last for abut 1,000 hours. Soloflex tells us that if I use it 10 minutes a day, 6 days a week the motor will last about 20 years.

    It is considered a class 1 Medical Device by the FDA. Those who shouldn't use this are recovering from surgery, have heart disease, neurological conditions, pre-existing deep vein thrombosis, joint implants or are pregnant.

    Soloflex suggests using it not just to vibrate but to vibrate while stretching, weight training, and doing Pilates. The company says that "The Soloflex WBV platform is the perfect size, shape and height to perform most free-weight dumbbell and barbell exercises. It's high enough off the floor to allow a full range of motion on bench presses, yet low enough to step off safely if balance is lost during standing exercises."

    Although I spent some time doing nothing but standing, sitting and lying on this platform I also incorporated some Yoga and Pilates moves. I could have done virtually any kind of dumbbell work such as bicep curls and bent over rows.

    I could control the vibration with a dial. So I could increase and decrease the amount of vibration. I tried it at all different strengths. I mentioned the acceleration levels above. Breaking it down it goes from .3 to .5 to .7, .8, .9, 1 and 1.1. I never broke a sweat from the vibration alone and found no miraculous cure to my autoimmune disorder. (See below for the essay on Sjogren's Syndrome.)

    The research

    "The Journal of Sports Sciences reports that vibrating while training with weights produces better gains than simply lifting weights alone.

    " Whole body vibration may increase the risk for injury, including low back pain and internal organ disruption."


    At Soloflex the company says that "The ANSI (American National Standards Institute) has established time limits for allowable workplace exposure to whole body vibration (WBV). The Soloflex WBV Platform safe exposure time is approximately 30 minutes a day at all acceleration levels."

    Claims made on behalf of Power Plate are given guarded support by researchers. We are cautioned that studies such as the one done by Jeffry McBride of Appalachian State University are not scientifically valid. In the two studies done by McBride, though some small improvements were found in athletes' vertical jumping, neither study compared one group training on the vibrating plate against a second group that trained conventionally. In other words if there is no control group a study is not sound.

    The Bottom Line

    The jury is still out. There isn't enough real research as stated in the November/December issue of Fitness Matters put out by the American Council on Exercise.

    The machines may be a valid warm up tool; there may be some improved balance in some and not in others (perhaps depending on age). Be aware that many of the studies are sponsored by the exercise company themselves.

    So the benefit of body vibration is in scientific limbo.

  14. #14

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    2,121

    Default

    yep...10 mins is equivalent to 1 hr of aerobic activity....improves bone density too. My mum and dad have one...my sister has one. My sister has lost 10kgs - gets on it for 10 mins a day. my mum and dad have only had theirs 4 weeks. In both cases theyve purchased not necessarily to loose weight, but to tone.
    They bougth from TVSN (foxtel shopping channel).
    They explained it on tele like imagine you are running down a slippery grassy hill, and you are about to fall, you tighten your leg muscles to stop the fall - pretty much what the vib. platform does for 10 mins constantly. Your muscles are contracting for that amount of time (and at what speed you decide).
    Ive had a '10 min' go on mums....and i definetly feel that endorphine rush when i get off it - you know that feeling you have after doing a good workout, swimming a few laps ??? it defn got the blood pumping around my legs...and the next day my legs were stiff and sore, just like they would be from a netball game or something...whilst im interested in it...i kinda like the ole traditional way of exercising, be that a game of netball or a few laps of a pool....but thats just me...

  15. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Rural NSW
    Posts
    6,975

    Default

    Ok, so if muscles are contracting then they must be using up lots of extra oxygen... meaning that you should start to breath harder...?

    I would be worried about the organ damage. It's not natural and that means something will probably go wrong eventually.

  16. #16

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    In the Angelic Realm
    Posts
    1,675

    Default

    Thanks Baths.

    I was actually looking at the one from TVSN. Its $699 on TVSN with a 3 year warranty, whilst on Ebay they go for about $320 with a 12 month warranty. I'm just cautious on buying it from Ebay because their warranties are not legit most of the time.

  17. #17

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    7,260

    Default

    just saw something about this today on 'body and brain overhaul' - it is a vibrating plate you stnad on, do sqauts on etc.
    Apparently the major benefit is int he reduction of stress hormones or something?

    The way the guy explained it was excellent - he was talking about the fight or flight response in the body and how we dont use it like we used to to aleviate stress in the body.It is supposed to be really good for your muscles as most of your body needs to engage to stay stable, thus burning calories. 10 or 15 mins was what he uses.


    (The guy hosting the show was the man that does the biological age testing on Biggest Loser - Paul Taylor) I am sure you can see the episode online - it was on channel 10 today but airs normally on ONE HD - the explaination was fabulous

  18. #18

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Adelaide SA
    Posts
    684

    Default

    A girlfriend of mine has one and we were talking to a trainer at the gym about them. Apparently they are quite good but the cheaper ones aren't as good. It has to do with how the plate vibrates. The trainers opionion on them is that they are usefull as they use more muscle fibres than just a normal work out. For example doing a squat will use 65% of muscle fibres whereas if you do a squat on the vibrating machine you will use 99% of the muscle fibres.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •