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Thread: Some questions

  1. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by surprised View Post
    TC - That's a good point about the niqab. I do feel confronted if I see someone in it - I think for me it's because I can't see the person in their own skin, so I can't gauge body language, facial expressions.
    I feel the same way, about not being able to gauge body language etc. Another question if that's ok; As someone who wears a niqab, do you find it easier to identify someone and gauge body language? Can you recognise a friend walking at a distance?

    Thank you!

  2. #20

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    Sparklez - I laughed at your reference to constant BBQs. I'm friends with a few Lebanese and Turkish muslims. The BBQs are the best!!!

    Also - great thread.


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  3. #21

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    about being able to tell if i know its a friend who is wearing a niqab in the distance, yes i can, very easily lol. you learn how they walk and move, their eyes and certain colours they usually wear. oh and shoes! my best friend always wears out there kind of shoes or bright socks lol

    I have learnt to smile with my eyes when talking to people. also using hand expressions as body language helps.

  4. #22

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    Wow an amazing topic. So, this is what I have missed without a few days of internet connection.

    1. What kind of food do you eat at home (and I do realise that Muslims are from lots of different countries)?
    The answer to your question: Food. . Unforunately, we were colonised by the Italians so therefore we have some Italian inspired dishes. I cook spagetti and sauce, lasagna, rice dishes, etc. I don't cook too many traditional dishes because I have not mastered them yet.

    2. What kind of involvement do you have at your mosque?
    Unforunately, none. I am very busy with my little babies. However, during the Eid-Ul-Fitr (Eid celebrations) we do go to the Mosque to pray.

    3. What do you do on Christmas Day?
    My family and I do nothing. Of course, I notice it is Christmas because of the television, shopping centres - it's everywhere. Do I mind? No. Why? Because this is not a Islamic country. So I just take advantage of the shopping that is around. We don't celebrate it. I don't tell my children about it although last christmas a relative of my mine told my eldest child about Santa because she was wondering who that fat man in the red suit was.

    4. What do you think when you see a non-Muslim woman?
    Nothing. I don't judge a book without its cover. I treat a non-Muslim woman like anything other woman regardless which religion she practices or how she chooses to dress.

    5. What is your relationship with Allah like? Does he seem close and personal, or distant and aloof?
    Close when I am practicing my religion and not miss a prayer.

    6. What is the best thing about being Muslim in Australia?
    Freedom. I choose how I want to live, dress, etc.

    7. What is the worse thing?
    When someone tells me to "Go back to your country", this isn't your country pal That doesn't apply to indigenous aboriginals.
    Last edited by Girl-23; June 30th, 2011 at 10:54 PM. Reason: Spelling

  5. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by RockinSAHD View Post
    I feel the same way, about not being able to gauge body language etc. Another question if that's ok; As someone who wears a niqab, do you find it easier to identify someone and gauge body language? Can you recognise a friend walking at a distance?

    Thank you!
    I find it difficult to comprehend what is so confronting about the niqab? I can read the expressions of someone with a niqab. I knew when she was happy, upset, angry because of her tone of voice and the expressions in her eyes and this was in a professional work environment.

    RockinSAHD - I bet you don't see many women wearing the niqab in Rockingham so I understand your possible fear. It's the environment around you that has contributed to this fear. I don't think I can answer your question about recognising a friend from far distance.

  6. #24

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    Oh and also when in saying you can reveal in front of male family members it's only your father, brothers, uncles (not your mums sisters husband Itms) and of course your husband and your father in law.
    I don't fin the niqab confronting, I think I'm used to it now, but I do become curious. I wear the hijab, and I do get the stares and back handed comments but these women here in my side of the state do cop alot slack.
    Yes it is very interesting to learn all the fresh and very (well to us) the important day to day ways of living.
    But on the flip aide I do get people's reservations and I guess fearfulness and anxiety, we are very different in dress and religion which to some that aren't accustomed to it, can become intimidated an overwhelmed by even just the sight of a group of fully covered woman..
    But at the end of the day we all breathe, an live the same air..
    You girls are awesome!!


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  7. #25

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    Yes, you can reveal yourself to a Mahram. In arabic Mahram means an unmarriageable kin with whom sexual intercourse would be considered incestuous, a punishable taboo. This includes:

    Permanent or blood mahrams with whom one is mahram by a blood relationship:

    father, mother, grandfather, grandmother, great-grandfather, great-grandmother and so on;
    brother, sister;
    son, grandson, great-grandson, daughter, grand-daughter, great-grand-daughter;
    uncle, aunt, great-uncle, great-aunt, and so on;
    nephew, niece, grandnephew, grandniece, great-grandnephew, great-grandniece and so on
    In-law mahrams with whom one becomes mahram by marrying someone:

    father-in-law, mother-in-law;
    son-in-law, daughter-in-law,
    stepfather (motherís husband) if their marriage is consummated, stepmother (fatherís wife) if their marriage is consummated;
    stepson (husbandís son) if their marriage is consummated, stepdaughter (wifeís daughter) if their marriage is consummated
    Rada or milk-suckling mahrams with whom one becomes mahram because of being nursed by the same woman.
    [sahih Muslim]

  8. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Girl-23 View Post
    Yes, you can reveal yourself to a Mahram. In arabic Mahram means an unmarriageable kin with whom sexual intercourse would be considered incestuous, a punishable taboo. This includes:

    Permanent or blood mahrams with whom one is mahram by a blood relationship:

    father, mother, grandfather, grandmother, great-grandfather, great-grandmother and so on;
    brother, sister;
    son, grandson, great-grandson, daughter, grand-daughter, great-grand-daughter;
    uncle, aunt, great-uncle, great-aunt, and so on;
    nephew, niece, grandnephew, grandniece, great-grandnephew, great-grandniece and so on
    In-law mahrams with whom one becomes mahram by marrying someone:

    father-in-law, mother-in-law;
    son-in-law, daughter-in-law,
    stepfather (motherís husband) if their marriage is consummated, stepmother (fatherís wife) if their marriage is consummated;
    stepson (husbandís son) if their marriage is consummated, stepdaughter (wifeís daughter) if their marriage is consummated
    Rada or milk-suckling mahrams with whom one becomes mahram because of being nursed by the same woman.
    [sahih Muslim]
    I think that's what I've just said without the details ?


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  9. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Girl-23 View Post
    I find it difficult to comprehend what is so confronting about the niqab? I can read the expressions of someone with a niqab. I knew when she was happy, upset, angry because of her tone of voice and the expressions in her eyes and this was in a professional work environment.

    RockinSAHD - I bet you don't see many women wearing the niqab in Rockingham so I understand your possible fear. It's the environment around you that has contributed to this fear. I don't think I can answer your question about recognising a friend from far distance.
    Though I don't live in Rockingham, where I do live is very White-centric which I don't like. I don't fear Muslims, one of my close friends is a devout Muslim and i have worked with many.
    I have my own complex issues with the niqab but wish the world was a lot more accommodating of people who choose to wear one. (especially French politicians and American traffic police IYKWIM)

    I laughed at thought of a woman wearing a niqab with brightly coloured socks! that's great!

  10. #28

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    I agree - Great thread!!

    Sparklez, I demand ALL of your delicious recipes pronto!!!!

  11. #29

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    I agree to what a wonderful thread, I have found it very interesting to read, Thank you ladies so much for sharing.

  12. #30

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    So, when you're in a group with other Muslim women, what do you talk about? (And I would be intrigued to know the answer for any other cultural groups - I guess I just like seeing how similar/different I am to other people).

    So it seems like the head covering is primarily related to sexuality and modesty? If you can reveal yourself to men with whom intercourse would be incestuous?

    Here's a big one: to me, Islam seems like a religion of fear. My perception (probably very media-influenced) is that Muslims pray/fast/etc because they are fearful of Allah, that women wear the covering because they are fearful of men, and that non-Muslims fear Muslims because Muslims would like to see the whole world as Muslims, under Sharia law. And the whole world (Muslims included) fears Muslim extremists (who I know are very different to everyday Muslims).

    Now, it's true that Christians would like to see everyone as Christians, but that is more out of love than the desire for domination (although history certainly shows that some Christians have a very strange way of expressing love!). In fact, I would say that the mark of someone who is truly living out their Christian faith, should be love.

    But when you all talk about Islam, I don't get that sense of fear from you. Can you tell me where my perceptions are wrong?

    I do hope that this comment doesn't offend anyone. That's certainly not my intention, and I sincerely apologise if it does. I am just wanting to be really honest, because I know if I go my whole life without discussing these things with Muslims then I will hold on to what I believe are probably incorrect perceptions. Although I think I'm wrong, I can't change my perceptions because I don't know what to change them to, if that makes sense. xo

  13. #31

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    great question.

    cant answer at the moment, i think i need some free time to sit and really nut it out. im a bit sick atm so will come back later today to write.

  14. #32

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    Surprised,

    Since September 11, Islam has been portrayed as an extreme, violent and barbaric religion. Prior to that Islam did not make many headlines. The word Islam means peace and submission. People need to understand the teachings of Islam before jumping to topics like the niqab, jihad or polygamy. You cannot understand the Islamic reasons behind such topics without understanding what Islam is or means, the 5 pillars of Islam, etc.

    I once had a conversation with a Christian girl from university. Do you know what she was arguing about? How Prophet Muhammad married Aisha when she was 9 years of age. Whereas, I wanted to know the logical and religious thinking of Trinity. How can God be Jesus, a person? Jesus is dead - because he is symbolised on the cross. How can people worship a dead person? Doesn't that mean God is dead, too?

    To understand Islam and Muslims you need to do your own research into this religion or speak to a Muslim person directly. You should not seek knowledge about Islam through a third party such as the media.

    A Muslim person prays, fast, because these are part of the 5 pillars of Islam. It is part of their faith. It is part of the Islamic practice ordered by Allah. A Muslim person does this to be obedient to the teachings of God which Allah revealed to his last Prophet Muhammad. As a Muslim, you want to be closer to Allah so therefore you follow the Islamic law and teachings to achieve this. I want to enter heaven because of my good deeds and want to please my lord who created me for this purpose Ė to worship Him and Him Alone. This life is test so we have to pass this. If you pass this test, you will be rewarded in paradise. A Muslim becomes fearful when they have committed a sin, etc. You need to feel fearful because of Allahís punishments. But such fear will not be there if you are following his laws Ė The Sunnah and the Quran (Koran).

    Islam is a religion of peace, submission, not fear. Islam is the fastest growing religion. So many women are converting to Islam. Perhaps they realise their Soul is worth the factual research. People are seeking the truth by researching what they believe to me true or want to know the truth. Christian Scientists are declaring the Koran is from God.

    The media has done a great job showing the negative and scary side of Islam. But then again, that is what makes news right? Reporting on the bad, never the good. Just like gossip. People are not interested in hearing about the good deeds of a person but rather their bad. Hopefully, that answers your question about: Islam seems like a religion of fear. My perception (probably very media-influenced) is that Muslims pray/fast/etc because they are fearful of Allah.



    I will reply to your next question: women wear the covering because they are fearful of men, next time.

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