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Thread: Cranial Osteopathy - Gold Coast? Specialising in babies treatments

  1. #1

    Default Cranial Osteopathy - Gold Coast? Specialising in babies treatments

    Hi,

    I'm searching for a Cranial Osteopathic on the Gold Coast who specialises in treatments for babies and kids.... someone reputable. Someone you may know who has seen someone on the gold coast for their baby or maybe you have? I would love a recommendation before just ringing anyone.

    It's for my 11 month old little girl.

    Thanks

  2. #2

    Default


  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Gold Coast
    Posts
    860

    Default

    Hmm, I pretty sure my sister has taken my nephew to an osteo since he was very young. Not so sure about the cranial part, but I will ask and get back to you.
    Please PM me if I forget, I am SO absent-minded during pregnancy.

  4. #4

    Default

    Yes please let me know!!! I really want to take my DD to one that's good....

    I'll probably forget to PM you.... I have 'mummy brain' and sleep deprivation badly!!

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Gold Coast
    Posts
    860

    Default

    Ok, this is the guy my sister raves about and would recommend to anyone.

    Dr Joya (sp?) Antares, Holistic Health centre at Ashmore. Not sure about putting phone numbers but here it is, if allowed: 55970669

    Hope he's able to help.

  6. #6

    Default

    That's great Crystal thank you!! I was meant to ring them today, I had their number but I ran out of time so tomorrow I will be calling them for sure.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Gold Coast
    Posts
    1,521

    Default

    REN I took BJ to see Joya when he was around 6 months old. He is meant to be a specialist in babies. He actually didn't do much as BJ was still quite young. I'm not sure how he'd be with an 11month old. Sorry, I'm not much help really

  8. #8

    Default

    Georgi, so would you recommend him? It sounds like you weren't happy with the treatment? Let me know... I've booked for Monday.

    I was recommended him by another Mum on another parenting site regarding sleep issues.

    Did you take BJ regarding sleep issues?

  9. #9

    Thumbs up

    Hi Shanti,

    Thanks to Google I just stumbled across this thread and - since I am being talked about - I thought it would be helpful if you heard from the horse's mouth!

    Georgi is absolutely right in that she would not have seen me do much with my hands - at least in that session.

    Of course some sessions are nothing but hands-on and it all depends on the presenting problem.

    Now I am not at liberty to discuss BJ here, but I can give a more general response and say that certain problems - for example those in which there is a need for a baby to use their muscles differently - require an osteopathic response that is much more "advisory" than "hands-on".

    By "advisory" I mean giving advice, for example advice with holding, positioning, handling, feeding etc. Factors such as how a baby is handled, held, put down, the positions that are used for play, for sleep etc., all form a fundamental part of the osteopathic care.

    Think about it, a session is just 40 minutes long, but a week is 168 hours of handling, holding, sleeping etc. Sometimes the best thing that an osteopath or other health professional can do is to provide advice about what to do in those many other hours during the week.

    In contrast, situations such as ones in which a baby's head has gone through a lot of squeezing and compression during the birth, may need a lot of hands-on work during the session and little or no time need be spent on positioning advice. A third type of session is a mix between these two.

    I hope this helps Shanti, and hope it clears this up for you too Georgi (I remember BJ {warm smile!} - but I think I would have seen him over 4 years ago and I'm not sure I'd recognise him now! )
    Last edited by Joyaa; October 11th, 2013 at 01:20 PM.

  10. #10

    Default Ptosis

    hi joyaa , I was wandering can you fix ptosis in eyelid I was born with this and I am 38 years of age , would love some feed back much appreciated ,,
    Quote Originally Posted by Joyaa View Post
    Hi Shanti,

    Thanks to Google I just stumbled across this thread and - since I am being talked about - I thought it would be helpful if you heard from the horse's mouth!

    Georgi is absolutely right in that she would not have seen me do much with my hands - at least in that session.

    Of course some sessions are nothing but hands-on and it all depends on the presenting problem.

    Now I am not at liberty to discuss BJ here, but I can give a more general response and say that certain problems - for example those in which there is a need for a baby to use their muscles differently - require an osteopathic response that is much more "advisory" than "hands-on".

    By "advisory" I mean giving advice, for example advice with holding, positioning, handling, feeding etc. Factors such as how a baby is handled, held, put down, the positions that are used for play, for sleep etc., all form a fundamental part of the osteopathic care.

    Think about it, a session is just 40 minutes long, but a week is 168 hours of handling, holding, sleeping etc. Sometimes the best thing that an osteopath or other health professional can do is to provide advice about what to do in those many other hours during the week.

    In contrast, situations such as ones in which a baby's head has gone through a lot of squeezing and compression during the birth, may need a lot of hands-on work during the session and little or no time need be spent on positioning advice. A third type of session is a mix between these two.

    I hope this helps Shanti, and hope it clears this up for you too Georgi (I remember BJ {warm smile!} - but I think I would have seen him over 4 years ago and I'm not sure I'd recognise him now! )

  11. #11

    Default Eyelid Ptosis

    Quote Originally Posted by Angy View Post
    hi joyaa , I was wandering can you fix ptosis in eyelid I was born with this and I am 38 years of age , would love some feed back much appreciated
    Hello Angy,

    As you will know - but some of our readers won't - eyelid "ptosis" is a condition in which the upper eyelid droops, and the eye will not open properly. It has various causes, however since you have had the problem from birth - known as "congenital ptosis" - and are now 38 and hopefully otherwise well - yours is very likely due to weakness of the muscle that raises the upper lid. Babies and young children with a drooping eyelid are sometimes brought to a paediatric osteopath for help. They will usually have the same condition as the one you seem to be describing.

    The Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne gives a nice fact sheet about eyelid ptosis here - Kids Health Info : Ptosis or drooping eyelid

    Now, the muscle weakness I refer to may be the result of a problem with the muscle itself, or it may have something to do with the nerve supply that innervates the muscle. If it is a problem with the muscle itself - like a poorly attached muscle - then osteopathy won't help and so far as I know surgery to tighten the muscle or suspend the eyelid is the best option.

    If the problem is caused by a problem with the nerve supply to the muscle, then I have seen cranial osteopathic work help a lot in some cases (but not in others). All the cases I have seen have been babies, or at the eldest, toddlers. Personally I haven't seen (i.e. treated) an adult with "congenital ptosis" and the best I can suggest is that you contact someone experienced in this sort of work and give it a go. You may get some improvement (which you may consider to be "enough") or - at the worst - you will get none. I would be surprised if you got complete resolution as you are now an adult

    If the reader is interested to know why osteopathy seems to work with some babies and not others, please ask and I'll respond in a second post.

    For Angy and other adults with congenital ptosis:
    Possibly (although I can't really speak for others so shouldn't!) the experienced osteopath may be able to tell you after their initial appraisal whether they think they can help you. If I can assume you don't have a history of other problems (like a history of serious head trauma; or like the ptosis is much worse when you are stressed and you commonly get stressed; etc) then I suggest you limit yourself to a "trial" of about three visits. That way you won't be spending too much money on what may turn out to be a wild goose chase.

    In summary: give it a go but be sensible with your purse.

    I hope this helps. Joyaa

  12. #12

    Default angy

    Thank you for your time in replying with your knowledge I think I will speak to a eye specialist about surgery ☆
    Quote Originally Posted by Joyaa View Post
    Hello Angy,



    As you will know - but some of our readers won't - eyelid "ptosis" is a condition in which the upper eyelid droops, and the eye will not open properly. It has various causes, however since you have had the problem from birth - known as "congenital ptosis" - and are now 38 and hopefully otherwise well - yours is very likely due to weakness of the muscle that raises the upper lid. Babies and young children with a drooping eyelid are sometimes brought to a paediatric osteopath for help. They will usually have the same condition as the one you seem to be describing.

    The Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne gives a nice fact sheet about eyelid ptosis here - Kids Health Info : Ptosis or drooping eyelid

    Now, the muscle weakness I refer to may be the result of a problem with the muscle itself, or it may have something to do with the nerve supply that innervates the muscle. If it is a problem with the muscle itself - like a poorly attached muscle - then osteopathy won't help and so far as I know surgery to tighten the muscle or suspend the eyelid is the best option.

    If the problem is caused by a problem with the nerve supply to the muscle, then I have seen cranial osteopathic work help a lot in some cases (but not in others). All the cases I have seen have been babies, or at the eldest, toddlers. Personally I haven't seen (i.e. treated) an adult with "congenital ptosis" and the best I can suggest is that you contact someone experienced in this sort of work and give it a go. You may get some improvement (which you may consider to be "enough") or - at the worst - you will get none. I would be surprised if you got complete resolution as you are now an adult

    If the reader is interested to know why osteopathy seems to work with some babies and not others, please ask and I'll respond in a second post.

    For Angy and other adults with congenital ptosis:
    Possibly (although I can't really speak for others so shouldn't!) the experienced osteopath may be able to tell you after their initial appraisal whether they think they can help you. If I can assume you don't have a history of other problems (like a history of serious head trauma; or like the ptosis is much worse when you are stressed and you commonly get stressed; etc) then I suggest you limit yourself to a "trial" of about three visits. That way you won't be spending too much money on what may turn out to be a wild goose chase.

    In summary: give it a go but be sensible with your purse.

    I hope this helps. Joyaa

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