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Thread: Taking steps to find out if DS2's challenging behaviour is "normal"

  1. #19

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    Thanks Fiona and Ginger. Lots for me to mull over and research. And I agree Fiona - it's important for a parent to know what's going on, even if they don't want to hear it. For me, I'm cool with any diagnosis. I don't see it as labelling or putting a child in a box they'll always be in. This is about giving DS2 the help he needs to cope better with his frustrations/anger/day-to-day life. Regardless of what I'm told about DS2 the main thing is I need strategies and a game plan. The psychologist I saw last year "gave" me some coping skills (albeit I still find his behaviour extremely difficult to deal with/manage), and I feel I now need a child psychologist/paed - someone who will focus on DS2 - to take a good look at DS2 and help us help him.

  2. #20

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    We have a diagnosis - Sensory Processing Disorder. In reading up about it, "most" of what I'm reading gels with DS2's behaviours. Certainly not all, but most.
    I have a referral to a place in Bris that specialises in children's disorders (from ADHD, Autism to weight management - and definitely includes SPD and behaviour management). And we've got our first appointment (for an assessment) on Friday.

    Here's hoping Friday is the start of something good for DS2 and us all ... fingers crossed, anyway.

  3. #21

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    Default Taking steps to find out if DS2's challenging behaviour is "normal"

    Wow that was quick! Great that you have a diagnoses and can get some appropriate strategies and support.

  4. #22

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    Wow that was fast! Hope things get easier to manage from here on

  5. #23

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    I think the "proof" will be when we have an assessment with an OT on Friday. The GP's diagnosis of SPD rings about 80% true, from what I've read about it - plus his other little quirks that I've been thinking further about. But I think the one hour assessment of DS2 will be far more thorough and accurate. So maybe stay tuned to an update on Friday!

    ETA: The GP ruled out ADHD, Aspergers and anything else on that path as DS2 is fine at daycare. So she believes testing for mineral deficiency etc is unnecessary. As I said, I'll wait till the OT looks at DS2 on Friday and I'll raise iy again. It does stand to reason though, as DS2 is "good" outside the house.
    Last edited by AndiE; February 13th, 2013 at 09:09 PM.

  6. #24

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    Wow. I have been following this thread cos much of your first post sounded like my DD. I have known that her dominant sense is touch (if you believe in Dunstan theory), and have wondered if there was something else. I think we still have to look at diet some more, especially as DS has diet issues.

    Hope you get some answers and techniques from the OT

  7. #25

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    Thought I'd update as we had part one of a two-part assessment today with the OT. So she definitely thinks DS2 has SPD - says it's the reason why he's unable to regulate himself (his emotions/behaviour etc). It came up that DS2 mouths many things, and the OT said it was (obviously) the trait of a baby/toddler, so DS2's cognitive skills regarding "testing out" certain things hadn't got past that phase. Hence, he'll mouth everything from the highchair leather to the kitchen table.



    It's too soon for the formal feedback, that will be in a couple of weeks, and I believe at that point we'll get a game plan to work with, and the OT will start actual therapy. But in the meantime we've been advised to start emphasising our emotions (... beyond "mummy is feeling very cranky", that is!) so DS2 can learn more about identifying his emotions. It's something we have tried to address in the past, but DS2 as yet hasn't come up to us before a meltdown and said "I feel ....".

    We've also been advised to start a visual schedule, so that DS2 knows what's coming up. The OT said less chance for a meltdown if he can see what's going to happen during any one day.

    It's a start, anyway. And I must say, there is some relief that "we" didn't cause his behaviour through our parenting, if that makes sense. Possibly that's a selfish attitude, and my entire focus is on DS2 becoming a calmer, happier boy. But it's a small comfort to know we're not completely dud parents!

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