Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Investigative / Inquiry / Tradtional / Play based learning

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    in the ning nang nong
    Posts
    12,163

    Default Investigative / Inquiry / Tradtional / Play based learning

    So in the past few weeks, DH and I have done extensive tours at a bunch of schools in our area, to figure out what school we want to send our sons to.

    They are All. So. Completely. Different.



    I want to ask people about their experience (as a parent, teacher, helper, etc) about different learning models ...


    What does your (or your child's) school do?

    What do you love about it? What aren't you so fond of?

    What are the results?

    How does it work/not work for your child, due to your child's personality/preferences/skills?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,300

    Default Re: Investigative / Inquiry / Tradtional / Play based learning

    Following this, - I am very interested to know what our chosen school follows (I have my own preference - play-based/investigative) as we have chosen just based on distance from flat and good reputation - I have been hoping they have some sort of open day/evening - to find out more about the schools philosophies, even though it wouldn't change my mind, as I think DD would cope fine with most (I am not confident enough that she wouldn't to travel further for a school at this point anyway).

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    In Bankworld with Barbara
    Posts
    14,222

    Default Re: Investigative / Inquiry / Tradtional / Play based learning

    You will find that the national curriculum is very much inquiry-based and once all schools are using it, they will all be following the same framework and it will come down to the individual teachers as to how that is implemented. There are different learning programs that they use for maths and literacy teaching (jolly phonics/L3 etc for literacy and the TENS program for maths) but all of the curriculum has inquiry learning embedded into it. Very few teachers/schools will teach the 'traditional' way of chalk and talk and if they do, run a mile because it's generally not the accepted way of teaching anymore. Teaching these days is a lot more dynamic and fluid and teachers *should* be able to adapt lessons to suit most kids and the needs of the content. I only say 'should' because that's what most teachers should be doing, but of course there are a few who don't.

    I really, really suggest that you get a copy of the book Free Schools because it busts wide open commonly held myths about education and what makes the 'best' school and none of it is to do with results.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,300

    Default Re: Investigative / Inquiry / Tradtional / Play based learning

    Quote Originally Posted by Trillian View Post

    I really, really suggest that you get a copy of the book Free Schools because it busts wide open commonly held myths about education and what makes the 'best' school and none of it is to do with results.
    I am on the waiting list at the library for that book (21 out of 23 reserves but the library has about 8 copies) and have read the free extract online - it looks like a great book.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    in the ning nang nong
    Posts
    12,163

    Default Re: Investigative / Inquiry / Tradtional / Play based learning

    Is that the same David Gillespie as the "sweet poison" guy?

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    in the ning nang nong
    Posts
    12,163

    Default Re: Investigative / Inquiry / Tradtional / Play based learning

    Any personal experiences / observations to share?


  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,300

    Default Re: Investigative / Inquiry / Tradtional / Play based learning

    Quote Originally Posted by peanutter View Post
    Is that the same David Gillespie as the "sweet poison" guy?
    Yes is the same guy.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    In the middle of nowhere
    Posts
    9,362

    Default Re: Investigative / Inquiry / Tradtional / Play based learning

    We chose a school with a play based investigative approach.

    TBH here in the Territory our results are always going to be different to other states, but for my kids it's been the best thing ever. Here there is more emphasis on engaging the kids and getting the indigenous kids to want to come to school.

    I have an exceptionally bright kiddo, and one that is just average - well we thought so. Turns out through this way of learning he is very bright, just in a different way to DD1. Had we sent them to a school that taught every kid the same and expected results from every kid (like the only two primary private schools here), he wouldn't have fit the mould.

    DD1 gets a little bored sometimes because I can imagine how hard it is to always tailor individually for every kid, but it also gives her the opportunity to practice diplomacy and teach what she already has mastered. Now that she's older and better at recognising stuff like that it's easier, but when she was littler it was a drag for her.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    In Bankworld with Barbara
    Posts
    14,222

    Default Re: Investigative / Inquiry / Tradtional / Play based learning

    From a parenting perspective, I'd rather have a school who was willing to adapt and change to suit the broader needs of their class as opposed to sticking to any one formula for teaching, because if they do, they aren't meeting the needs of their students properly and being the best teacher they can be. Some kids need structure and can't handle investigative/inquiry learning. Some kids thrive on doing their own thing and finding their own answers. A good teacher will know that and structure things accordingly. Of course if you have a class of 30 kids that gets harder to do, but it's still possible. The teacher needs to be able to engage kids because that's the most important thing because if kids aren't engaged, that's when teaching time and learning is lost. So I want a teacher that can do that, using any method, because if my kids are engaged in what they are doing, then they are learning.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    403

    Default Re: Investigative / Inquiry / Tradtional / Play based learning

    Haven't been around for a while. Just realised app worked again. And found login details. Following.

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,737

    Default Re: Investigative / Inquiry / Tradtional / Play based learning

    Our school is using the play/investigative based learning. It's certainly very different to the traditional style when I was at school.

    We have found it to be very effective for our kids. They learn based on their interests and often don't realise they are learning for numeracy last week they were building trains for example and comparing who has the most carriages rather than having to use the little blocks we used at school.

    Dd1 has carried her interest in dolphins from last year over to class work this year, the idea came from looking at the woolie's animal cards in class. It has involved a lot of research and she now knows a lot about them!

    Dd1 learns from interaction and a hands on approach. She gets easily distracted and would probably have fallen behind in a traditional classroom. Dd2 doesn't like the pressure of being told you must do something and this is how it's to be done. So it has suited them both. Not sure how ds will cope with this kind of learning he is definitely further along academically than both his sisters so I am hoping that given how they teach he can be extended and given the appropriate level of work to prevent boredom.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Investigative / Inquiry / Tradtional / Play based learning

    The school my kids attend begins at ELC (3 year olds, kinder, pre school) and runs a true Reggio Emilia program. Reggio is a play based approach, but many people misunderstand this to mean that the kids run riot and can do as they please! There is certainly structure to the day. If you google Reggio Emilia, you can read about it and be far more informed than I could explain! It is based on the premise that the child is capable and just needs to be given the opportunity to learn and create and express themselves (the 100 languages...). Reggio aims to lay the foundation for children to be life long learners.



    The school then runs the International Baccalaureate Primary Years Program (PYP) which is enquiry based learning. I find that an enquiry based approach results in kids who are engaged and focussed as they have confidence in their own abilities as learners. They are able to access information in a myriad of ways according to their own learning styles and preferences.

    I have very little faith in the traditional style of teaching as I don't think that rote learned information is engaging and very little of it is retained! My two older kids are very different learners, but Reggio and PYP has suited them both. My littlest is currently adoring her time in ELC!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •