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thread: Yogurt for baby

  1. #1
    Registered User

    Jan 2009
    A Pirate Ship
    3,627

    Yogurt for baby

    What yogurt do you give your baby and when did you start giving it to them? I don't particularly want to give DS a 'baby' yogurt, I'd rather get a good quality yogurt and add his pureed fruits to it. DH and I eat loads of the Queensland yogurt company gourmet yogurt and want to give DS a good one too


  2. #2
    BellyBelly Member
    Add Little Chicken on Facebook

    Mar 2010
    Melbourne
    1,855

    Have you thought about making your own? You can buy yoghurt makers or there are ways to make it without one. You just need a small amount of yoghurt as a starter culture.

  3. #3
    BellyBelly Member

    Mar 2009
    1,385

    I gave my baby mundella natural yoghurt from about 8 months. Just a little bit at a time. Sometimes I added fruit but he likes it plain too.

  4. #4
    BellyBelly Member

    Oct 2008
    3,132

    Wow Cherised, I saw this thread and couldn't believe your DS is six months already!!! Time flies

    Sorry, I don't know anything about yoghurt except that I have given my babies regular yoghurt from about 7 months and I've had no issues.

  5. #5
    BellyBelly Member
    Add Yeddi on Facebook

    Aug 2010
    In a library somewhere...
    788

    We make our own too. Commercial ones usually have quite a lot of sugar in them which I'm not a big fan of - seems to defeat the main purpose. Home made ones also have heaps more good bacteria in them than store bought. You can get yogurt makers for $20 from Woolies, and either use the packets or starter culture. It's really easy.

  6. #6
    BellyBelly Life Subscriber

    Jul 2009
    2,109

    We give DD Jalna yoghurt, it's that brand that they make it in the pot that you buy at the shops. I've compared it to other yoghurts including the baby yoghurt and it has heaps less sugar in it. We give her natural or greek style but we'll be starting other flavours soon enough I guess

  7. #7
    BellyBelly Member
    Add Little Chicken on Facebook

    Mar 2010
    Melbourne
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    We make our own too. Commercial ones usually have quite a lot of sugar in them which I'm not a big fan of - seems to defeat the main purpose. Home made ones also have heaps more good bacteria in them than store bought. You can get yogurt makers for $20 from Woolies, and either use the packets or starter culture. It's really easy.
    I used to do that, you can also get electronic ones (they just keep the milk warm though) that use just milk, milk powder (if you want) and some yoghurt. You then just save some of your first batch to make the next one. They make a lot of yoghurt though, mine made 1.5L at a time. But, like Yeddi said, you know exactly what is in it cause you put it there yourself. Why I make my own bread to.

  8. #8
    BellyBelly Member

    Jan 2007
    7,197

    We have always given them Jalna. Its yummy and low in sugar compared to others.

  9. #9
    BellyBelly Member
    Add helle on Facebook

    Sep 2008
    Bunbury, Western Australia
    3,963

    Jalna here too.

  10. #10
    BellyBelly Member
    Add JaCaMaDy on Facebook

    Jan 2010
    Queensland
    120

    Yep we use Jalna here too


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  11. #11
    Registered User

    Aug 2008
    Adelaide
    1,488

    Another Jalna user here too. DD and I both love the vanilla. I've never been a big yoghurt fan, but I love this brand.

    Does anyone else notice how rare it is to find full fat commercial yoghurt? So much of it is 'low fat' or 'diet'. DH was checking the labels and noticed that they had aspartame in them too instead of sugar.

  12. #12
    BellyBelly Member

    Feb 2007
    3,734

    yep so hard to find full fat unless you go a gourmet one. we used jalna. also gippsland or evia or some greek yoghurts.

  13. #13
    BellyBelly Life Subscriber

    Mar 2007
    6,900

    Jalna too! Yummy.

  14. #14
    Registered User

    Jan 2009
    A Pirate Ship
    3,627

    JustMe, I know!!! Crazy isn't it! And can you believe I've been wanting to be pregnant again ever since he was born

    Looks like Jalna is very popular, I've tried their honey one and vanilla and I have to say that it ended getting thrown out as neither dh or I liked the taste of it I was planing to get a natural one and to add DS's fruit purees to it anyway so maybe I'll get the biodynamic one or the greek style and have a go at that. My other concern is wasting it though, being in such a big tub.

    Making your own sounds like a fab idea! Can I ask what goes into the yogurt? I've always wanted to make kefir but have no clue how to do it!

  15. #15
    BellyBelly Member

    Nov 2008
    Perth
    3,686

    I either make my own with my EasiYo (they sell the makers and sachets in the desserts aisle at Woolies and Coles - it's powdered milk sachets and the cold and hot water combo in the maker is what creates the yoghurt) or we buy Mundella (usually the Greek Honey) or Farmers Union Greek. Yum

    We did use the Vaalia baby yoghurt initially but quickly changed to a normal brand - at half the price!

  16. #16
    BellyBelly Member
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    Aug 2010
    In a library somewhere...
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    Making your own sounds like a fab idea! Can I ask what goes into the yogurt? I've always wanted to make kefir but have no clue how to do it!
    You can get an easyo from woolies. It's usually on the top shelf in the packet desert aisle (edit: snap T, got in before me ). You can start out just by using their unsweetened packet mixes which are about $4, and it makes a litre. Once you've got into the groove, just save a generous tablespoon of yogurt.

    To make:
    Bring 1 litre of milk to the boil (we use either A2 or goats milk). You can add 1/2 cup of whisked in milk powder to make yogurt thicker. As soon as it starts to froth turn down the heat and simmer for a couple of minutes. Remove from heat and stand. When the milk is cool enough you can comfortably hold your finger in it to the count of 10 it's ready. Place tbsp of saved yogurt in a bowl and poor strained milk over the top and then whisk. Transfer to container and place in yogurt maker as per normal instructions. Let stan for 8-12 hours and then transfer to fridge. Easy as!

    We used to do keifer milk but with the yogurt we got so sick of milk products, so now we just do keifer water instead. You can get your health food store to order some in (they normally wont stock it on the shelves). When it's dried you have to activate it over a week, but once it's activated we just put it in 1 litre of cooled boiled water (it needs to be boiled or distilled otherwise the chlorine in it will kill the bacteria) with two big tablespoons of brown sugar to feed it (the sugar is completely used up by the time you drink it) and cover with a muslin cloth for 24-48 hours, strain, drink the water and use the starter again. With Keifer however, you have to treat it like a pet, constantly feeding it and processing it, or you have to throw it out and start again, or strain it and put the culture in an airtight jar in the fridge but the most you'll get is maybe a week before it starts to go green (that would be a last resort - better to get a friend to Keifer-sit if you have to go away). You can salvage green keifer, but it can be a pain in the butt and only something I would do if desperate because I couldn't get it again.

  17. #17
    BellyBelly Member

    Feb 2010
    Travelling
    666

    Good thread I was wondering about making my own yogurt as DD is now on a restricted dairy diet but I still let her have a little A2 milk now and again so I'd like to make her some yogurt with it - I think she's been missing it as one of her fave foods.

    Yeddi, Is goats milk counted as non-dairy? Maybe we should give it a try... rice milk got a big thumbs-down and I'm cautious about soy.

    Sorry to hijack!

  18. #18
    BellyBelly Member
    Add Yeddi on Facebook

    Aug 2010
    In a library somewhere...
    788

    Yeddi, Is goats milk counted as non-dairy? Maybe we should give it a try... rice milk got a big thumbs-down and I'm cautious about soy.
    No, it's still considered dairy, but it's the closest animal milk to human milk and is easier to digest. It also has more of the good nutrients and less of the "not so good for you" ones. It is a little tarter, but if you put pureed fruit with it the sweetness evens it out.

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