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Thread: Nuclear scan

  1. #1

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    Default Nuclear scan

    Ned is having a nuclear scan tomorrow to check for kidney damage. Has anyone elses bub had this and if so, what does it involve. He has to have a canulla and the dye injected at the hospital beforehand, but what does the actual scan involve? Do they strap him in ? Are there any side effects?


  2. #2

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    Can't help you SOph, but just here to say I'm sorry he has to have the procedure done, and I hope everything is all right.

    (great name for him BTW!)

  3. #3

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    Thanks Divvy - yes you have fine taste too

  4. #4

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    Apparently in about 7 months I will be a qualified midwife - yikes!
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    Soph, I don't have a child that has, but my nephew was born with Kidney problems and had to have regular Nuclear scans, I can ask my sister if you like?

  5. #5

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    Thanks Relle - that would be great!

  6. #6
    kerry Guest

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    Soph, first can I say you and your little one are in my thoughts.

    Ok, while I have not had a child have a Renal Scan (nuclear Renal Scan) I have had many myself. This scan will test 1 or both of 2 things. A perfusion test evaluates the blood flow through the kidneys and a Function Test monitors how long it takes the radioactive trace to pass through the kidneys. Yes you need to remain still for these scans, so they may 'restrain' your little boy. Some hospitals will medically sedate children though. I have included some information on preparing an infant for renal scans that might help you.

    Side Effects, beside the injection pain (which is the siting of an iv and no different to any iv getting put in) most peopl report no pain or discomfort. If there is an infection in the kidney's you may feel a bruise like pain for a day or too. Some people (very rare) will have irritation at the site of the iv caused by the radioactive material. You must be extra stringent with nappy changes and had wwashing for 48 hours after the procedure as the radioactive material leaves the body. Little ones may become distressed by being held down.

    NOW - talk to your doctor/specialist... hound him or her. Part of their job is to obtain informed consent, which means they have to 'inform', explain and teach you what is going on. If they talk in babble or jargon keep asking questions until you understand. Don't let any medical professional bully you into accepting an answer you don't understand because they make you feel stupid. They are just men and women, they are not gods. Use phrases like, "could you please explain it to me again, I'm not quite sure of what you mean" or "Could you please explain it without the technical terms".. if they be 'smart' and start talking to you as if you are a moron.. pull them up straight away.. "No I didn't say please patronise me and be condescending, I asked you to explain the procedure in clear terms that someone who hasn't spent years studying this could understand"... this will pull them up every time. You are your child's advocate, and you need to feel comfortable with what is happening or your baby will pick up on this uneasiness and the situation will be harder for him.

    Again wishing you all the best.




    Infant test/procedure preparation

    Information
    For older children, research has shown that preparation may reduce crying or resistance of the procedure. Prepared children report less pain and show less distress. Proper preparation for a test or procedure may reduce an older child's anxiety, encourage cooperation, and help develop coping skills.

    Given the developmental level of your child (0 - 1 year), pre-test preparation will be of little benefit, but some considerations may ease your anxiety.

    Before the test, know that your child probably will cry, and restraints may be used. The most important way you can help your child through this procedure is by being there and showing you care.

    Crying is a normal response to the strange environment, unfamiliar people, restraints, and separation from you. Your infant will cry more for these reasons than because the test or procedure is uncomfortable.

    Knowing this from the onset may help relieve some of your anxiety about what to expect. Having specific information about the test may further reduce your anxiety. For more information please see the appropriate test.

    WHY RESTRAINTS?

    Infants lack the physical control, coordination, and ability to follow commands that older children and adults usually possess. Restraints may be used during a procedure or other situation to ensure your infant's safety. Your infant may be restrained by hand or with physical devices.

    For example, if your infant needs an x-ray, clear test results require there be no movement. Furthermore, in radiological and nuclear studies, all staff briefly leave the room while the films are taken. In these situations, restraints are used for your infant's safety.

    If a venipuncture is performed to obtain a blood sample or start an IV, restraints are important in preventing injury to your infant. If your child moves while the needle is being inserted, trauma could damage the venous system, bone, tissue, or nerves.

    Most tests and procedures require extreme accuracy to obtain the desired outcome, whether to place an IV correctly, ensure accurate test results, or to avoid injuring the infant.

    Your provider will use every means to ensure the safety and comfort of your baby. Besides restraints, other measures include medications, observation, and monitors.

    DURING THE PROCEDURE

    Your presence helps your infant during the procedure, especially if the procedure allows you to maintain physical contact. If the procedure is performed at the hospital or your health care provider's office, you will most likely be given the opportunity to be present.

    If you are not asked to be by your child's side and would like to be, ask your provider if this is possible. If you think you may become ill or anxious, consider keeping your distance, but remaining in your infant's line of vision. If you are not able to be present, leaving a familiar object with your infant may be comforting.

    OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

    Ask your provider to limit the number of strangers entering and leaving the room during the procedure, since this can raise anxiety.
    Ask that the provider who has spent the most time with your child perform the procedure.
    Ask that anesthetics be used where appropriate to reduce the level of discomfort your child will feel.
    Ask that painful procedures not be performed in the hospital crib, so that the infant does not come to associate pain with the crib. Many hospitals have special treatment rooms where procedures are performed.
    Imitate the behavior you or your health care provider need the infant to do, such as opening the mouth.
    Many children's hospitals have child life specialists who are specially trained to educate patients and families and advocate for them during procedures. Ask if one is available.

  7. #7

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    Soph, I hope all went well today and all is ok with Ned's kidneys.

    How's your little guy tonight?

  8. #8

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    Ah thanks lovely ladies for all the support. Special thanks Kerry for all the info.

    Well the short story is - no kidney damage

    The long story is....poor little bugger it took them over an hour and 5 attempts (iun 5 different spots) to put the canulla in. He has very deep and very thin veins (like everyone else in the family!). He was screaming for the entire hour they were trying (and this is a bub that rarely cries). They were even looking for veins in his head at one point and talking about giving him a GA and some gas which helps the veins pop out. Anyway we got a vein in the end and the canulla held. He had the neuclear stuff then 3 hours later was strapped into this machine for about 30 mins while it moved around and took photos. He was SOOOOOO good. Smiled and cooed the entire time and then fell asleep! I love my boy. So glad he is healthy.

    Paed has said to start solids because of the weight loss in the hope it will mean i can continue bf...but that's a whole other story!

  9. #9
    kerry Guest

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    Soph, so glad Ned had no perminant damage. What a strong little man, and beside the IV dramas he manage to pull through the scan part so well.

    Regarding the starting of solids maybe get the opinion of a paed nutritionist. There are vitamin suppliments available from newborn that can assist with the weight loss issues. Also now he is well you may find te weight just packs on for a while and he catches right back up to the silly percentile figures don't they just give you nightmares!)

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