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Thread: Why you should choose soft cloth/ergo slings vs other carriers (eg. Baby Bjorn)

  1. #37

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    Default Slings vs Pouches

    Honestly, does it have to be vs? Why can't it be personal choice and what works for individuals? Do we need to beat each other (and ourselves) up over something else? Lets just support each other through the difficulties of child rearing and know that there are enough "knockers" out there, without adding to it (and I obviously don't mean 'knockers' in the "good" way that guys often like!)

    I used BB with my 2nd child - also a big baby, and had no problems. Personally (and I know that there are many who love the wraps, slings etc, one of my best friends is very much pro-slings etc.) I hate the idea of the slings - if I'm going to spend that long putting something on to 'wear' my baby, I'd rather just carry her.



    I don't know about other people, but if I need my hands free so badly, I have a pram, and quite frankly, I don't always have the time to muck around with the placement of the sling, and it scares me that if I have one bit in the wrong spot, the floor might be wearing my baby instead of me!

  2. #38

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    Default

    If you hate the idea of slings, why did you post in the sling wearing section, may I just politely inquire?
    One of my main beefs about BB is that it hinders breastfeeding on the go - as well as the ergonomic disadvantages to both baby and mummy. I'd rather carry than wear if only a BB was on offer
    This thread is about the greater merits and benefits of better designed carriers than the BB-type as based on research and professional anecdote, not a pram vs baby-wearing thread.

  3. #39

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    Mel, the word "vs." is referring to the pros and cons of the various styles of carriers, not to the wearers of the carriers. We're not saying that the wearer of a sling is a better mum than the wearer of a BB. If you read the opening post, it explains the ergonomic advantages of slings and soft structured carriers over the BB type.
    And for what it's worth, a pouch sling is at least as fast to put on as a BB, if not faster. The same goes for soft structured carriers like the Ergo. And with those there is no more danger of your baby falling out as there is with the BB.
    I think what you were referring to are wrap style carriers like the Hug-a-Bub. it's true, they are not everybody's cup of tea. But a soft structured carrier is a perfect compromise. It is just as easy as a BB, but the way the baby sits in it is much more ergonomically sound.

    I have tried various different carrier, including a BB. The BB was alright for short term use with my then 1 year old. I'm talking about 15 minutes. But no way would I have been able to carry her in it for 3-4 hours like I could in the Ergo. So the way you use them has a huge influence on which carrier works for you.

    Having said that, the main thing is that you ARE carrying your baby. Which carrier you use or if you only use your arms, that's all secondary.

  4. #40

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    Default

    Maya - I think that Mel might have been referring specifically to ring slings when she said that she doesn't like the idea of slings.

    If one wanted to be really specific, this forum should be named 'Baby Carriers & Baby Wearing', as the term sling is not generic to all carriers, but refers to a particular type of carrier - ie: a one-shouldered carrier that is 'slung' across the body. An Ergo, for example, is not a sling, but a SSC (soft structured carrier).

    I get what Mel is saying though. I generally tell people that if a BB works for you and your baby - great! But it is also important that people know that there are disadvantages to this carrier and that there are many alternatives that allow you to babywear if a BB doesn't work for you or your baby. So many people try a BB, hate it, and give up on babywearing without realising that there are many alternatives. In the same way, I would suggest woven wraps to someone who has enjoyed using a HAB or other stretch wrap with their small baby and are finding it no longer supportive as he/she gets bigger, but wants to keep wrapping.

    It is worth mentioning that despite the concerns raised in the article linked to in this thread there has been no substantiated evidence that 'crotch danglers' like the BB are responsible for pelvic or spinal damage in infants, despite being in widespread use for over thirty years. I know a physiotherapist who babywears and who says that although she wouldn't use a BB for reasons of comfort and that they do not promote an ideal posture, there is no substantiation to the suggestion that they are responsible for spinal compression, which is usually associated with high impact, continual use stress injuries (eg: from elite high impact sports). Unlike the well documented and substantiated concerns regarding positional asphyxia using 'bag' slings like the Infantino, which has consequently been withdrawn from sale in the US, there has not been similar corroboration relating to the concerns about the BB.

    If I was asked to recommend a carrier a baby bjorn would not be my recommendation - there are better designed carriers out there that are just as easy to use, and these days, easy to find. BBs are more likely to be uncomfortable and unsupportive for both wearer and wearee, they are impossible to breast feed in (despite their claims), limited in the carrying positions available, limited in adjustability, and extremely limited in the weight range that they can be used in. But whilst it can legitimately be said that a carrier where all of the weight is supported by the crotch, rather than in a natural seated position, does not encourage ideal posture, the BB has been in use for thirty years and the evidence does not exist to support the claim that these carriers cause long term injury or spinal damage.

  5. #41

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    I got a BB for DD1 but found it left bruises on my shoulders so I got a Hugabub best choise I made. For DD2 I got addicted to slings now have a ring sling or 2 (one heavy one light) sold the BB and got an Ergo sooooo comfy wish I had known about them to start with

  6. #42

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    I used a close carrier from birth, loved it! Was easy quick to put on, comfortable , and DD was happy in it for ages! I could also feed her in it if i wated to, i then brought a BB it was awful! IMO. DD felt to cramped and had no room to move, it killed my back shoulders and i was in agony
    So i got a ergo, DD loves it, she can move around and has room to move and see out, easy quick to put on, she can fall asleep in it and i can feel the weight is distributed all over my back and hips not just my shouldners, i can and have worn it for hours at a time with no pain at all, i love it
    I will also never get rid of my Close carrier as for me it was the perfect newborn/yung baby carrier

  7. #43

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    As a mother of a child who was born with severe hip dysplasia (a few mm from dislocated socket) that was not picked up until past 3 months old, I am the biggest Baby Bjorn critic. DD's orthopaedic surgeon condemns them, they're terrible for a babies hips and spine. They not only make hip dysplasia much worse, they can encourage it by putting the wrong type of pressure on the hips. DD's doctor was very impressed with her improvement, she spent 10 months in the brace (3 full time, another 3 with only an hour out a day) with no surgery, which was uncommon for her level of dysplasia. When we turned up for an appointment and DD was still in the Ergo or CC (can't remember which) he asked if we'd always worn her, and said that was likely a huge reason why she was recovering so fast and so well. THAT sells how crappy BB are for me, not that the ACM endorses them for financial gain, or that they're popular.

  8. #44

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    I've got an Ergo carrier and also picked up a Hub a bub sling on sale, while I was pregnant. I just wanted to ask, to what age can I use the HAB? I haven't used it yet (DD is 4 months old) - only b/c I have two overactive boys (aged 3 & 4) and when I get anywhere, they're out of their seats and jumping into the front seat and trying to get out and I'm the screaming banshee woman (y'know, the one in the Woolworths carpark!) So I just haven't had the time to work out the soft sling yet. I have liked using the ergo carrier but just wondering whether I should perservere with the HAB while she's still little?
    Thanks for posting the article.

  9. #45

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    Default Re: Why you should choose soft cloth/ergo slings vs other carriers (eg. Baby Bjorn)

    I found the HAB comfy until DD1 was around 7-8kg. I used to tie it at home so I could just pop her in and out, rather than dealing with all that fabric in the car park.
    Last edited by Tuesday's Child; September 11th, 2012 at 12:53 PM.

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