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Thread: Stutter

  1. #1

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    May 2004
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    Question Stutter

    Hi girls

    Of late I have noticed more and more that Emily is beginning to stutter.

    Eg, "I, I, I, I, I am going outside".

    Any clues what may cause it or how to deal with it?

    Tanya

    Ooops I posted this in the wrong forum... Whoops, sorry mods.

    Last edited by Tanya; January 10th, 2007 at 08:10 AM.

  2. #2

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    Tanya, Brandon used to do this, form the time he was about 3 or so. They actually called it a stammer. I got him into speech therapy, but he only went twice, his stammer was pretty bad too. He would go my my my my muuuuuummmm. And would end up closing hs eyes trying to get his words out. In the end I think he just grew out of it. I was so scared he would still be doing it when it came time for school but he was over it by then.

    Try not to rush her or finish her words off, as hard as that can be. We were told that Brandon had such a huge vocabulary for his age that he was getting muddled and just having troubles getting his words out.

    Maybe call your community health centre and see if they can organise a SP appt for you guys and see where you are at. Better to deal with it sooner rather than later.

    Goodluck and let me know how you go.

  3. #3

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    Thanx heaps girls

    That's very relieving to hear that it may be just a phase.

    Tanya

  4. #4
    *TamaraP* Guest

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    My uncle used to stutter as a child. My grandmother gave him poetry to read and he grew out of it quite quickly.

  5. #5
    Fruitwood Guest

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    Hi, I used to stutter quite badly as a child which was hard around other kids but I grew out of it around the age of 7 or 8. I still do stutter if I am really really really nervous. It's not noticeable at any other time though.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jillian View Post
    I would say "Stop. Now start again and talk slowly." I think it is because they are wanting to say one thing (like 'I want to go outside') but their little brains are thinking to what they are going to do when they get outside, so they get stuck on a word.
    Please please please don't do this. I have vivid memories of my dad doing it to me when I was little & it drove me nuts. In the end I just didn't bother telling him things because I would get that line every time I said something. I knew what I wanted to say, I just couldn't get it out & I'm not sure it was a speed thing (as in talking too quickly). I shudder at how many times my dad said "stop, think about what you are going to say & then say it", he even mentioned it in his speech a my wedding :eek:

    Fruitwood, I am the same - still do it every now & then.

    If you're really worried Tanya, get Emily off to a speech therapist to be checked as the others said. If you're not worried I think the best way to deal with it is to ignore it as bringing attention to it can make her more frustrated and possibly make it worse.

  7. #7

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    Moving to General Baby & Toddler Discussion

  8. #8

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    Hey Tanya

    I'm a Speech Pathologist. I don't specialise in stuttering...but here's what I know.

    It really may be worthwhile getting Emily checked out...especially if you are noticing it more and more.

    Stutters do come and go...they are more obvious when kids' "systems" are under "stress"...like if they are really tired, really emotional and also when they are having a bit of a "language spurt". Kids can have really good days/weeks/months and then the stutter can re-appear.

    There used to be the understanding that most kids grow out of it and just leave them be...but more and more...they are finding that some kids don't grow out of it, and the older kids are, the harder treatment is for them...

    These days, there are fantastic techniques to help kids who stutter...and the treatment outcomes for the under 5's are incredibly successful...and Australia is known for leading the way in stuttering therapy...there's a successful programme for under 5's called the Lidcombe project...try googling it, if your interested.

    In no way do I want to panic you, but I would suggest that you perhaps take Emily to a Speech Pathologist...often stuttering is treated as a priority, so you may find that the waitlists for government clinics aren't that long...the other thing would be contacting Speech Pathology departments in Universities...they often have stuttering clinics... If possible, ask for a SP who specialises in stuttering...as it's a pretty specific and specialised field.

    If she grows out of it, whilst she's on the waitlist, that's great!!! If not, then you are able to have her properly assessed and treated.

    Here's some other ideas I got off the net...

    What should I do if my child stutters?
    Do:
    • Take time to listen to your child without distractions or competition from other family members.
    • Listen to what your child is saying, not how it is being said (ie don't worry about the stutters).
    • Let your child finish what they are saying, don't finish words or sentences for them.
    • Repeat or rephrase what your child says to show that you have understood.
    • Reassure your child if he or she is aware of the stutter and is concerned.
    • Praise your child when he or she is fluent.
    • Slow down YOUR part in the conversation, so the conversation will hopefully naturally slow down
    • Have your child assessed by a Speech Pathologist.

    Don't:
    • Draw attention to your child's speech in front of others or put him or her in situations where speech is on display.
    • Interrupt your child's speech or complete sentences for him or her.
    • Criticise your child's speech.
    • Tease your child about their stutter.
    • Let other people (ie friends, parents) make comments or try to correct your child's speech.
    Last edited by monnie; January 31st, 2007 at 12:41 PM.

  9. #9

    Join Date
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    Adelaide SA
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    Nick started to stutter when he was around 2 1/2 - 3, it wasn't that bad, i think his mind was just going a million miles a minute, but he grew out of it in a few months, 3 i think

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