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Thread: Is there such a thing?

  1. #1

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    Default Is there such a thing?

    Isla is really difficult to medicate when it comes to things like panadol. She is teething at the moment & really needs a dose at night. With her eye teeth cutting atm she is waking a million times at night crying & pulling at her mouth.
    the thing is though she HATES panadol. Panadol the brand makes her gag & cough, other brands ( I have tried about 3 others) are not much better.
    I pretty much have to pin her down & squirt it into her mouth. But she has learnt how to spit it back out before I can get her to swallow & it really is much more traumatic then I would like it to be.

    So I was thinking, is there like a patch you can use? Would be great if I could just stick a baby panadol patch on her bum & know she will get some relief from her teeth with out me traumatising her. I would really like a unbroken nights sleep too.


  2. #2

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    I have seen a panadol suppository, not sure she will like it though.

  3. #3

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    lol nah somehow I don't think that woul dbe any better then oral

  4. #4

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    Never heard of a patch, but it's a good idea! You should patent it!

    Have heard of the natural lollipops, but I don't know what ages they are suitable for. Have you tried the bonjeala thing? Clove oil is supposed to be good, too.

  5. #5

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    Maybe she might be happy to take it orally if she saw what the alternative was

  6. #6

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    I hear you. We have just been through a month of DS being so uncomfy from his teeth and waking constantly.

    He also spits out panadol but what we do is give him a squirt in his mouth and then hold a dummy in his mouth. His immediate reaction is to suck and therefore swallow. If you don't use a dummy I guess you could try a finger.

    HTH
    Spring

    ETA: BTW I think a patch is a fantastic idea.

  7. #7

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    There's no patch but the suppositories are actually pretty good.
    When DD was about 18 months old she had this god awful viral infection that affected her mouth and throat and she couldn't eat or drink properly for days. She was in lots of pain and wouldn't come at oral panadol at all.
    The suppositories were easy - they're really tiny and you just pop a bit of lube on the end and in they go . She didn't even notice.
    The worst part was bringing ourselves to do it but once we did it the first time it was fine
    Hope you get some sleep soon poor little button

  8. #8

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    I was going to suggest the suppositories too. My niece, when she was sick, her mum would ask her if she wanted panadol, and which one she wanted. Depending on how sick she was she would ask for it in her bottom. LOL. Hope she's grown out of that now.

    Have you tried Nurophen ? It's a bit sweeter and thicker than panadol and not as easy to spit. I squirt it right at the back of their mouths, almost straight into their throat. Less chance of it coming out that way.

    Hope you get some sleep tonight FJ.

  9. #9

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    I just had to giggle when I read this post. About a month ago I was at the dr's with dd and she gave me some "buttpills" for dd in case of fever. Then she told me her little boy was also sick and just the previous night she asked him is she could give him a suppository. He said: " O yes, please mummy, thank you mummy" So she made him lay on the bed and bend his knees and he was mumbling "thank you mummy, thank you mummy" the over and over whole time, BUT he was clenching his buttcheeks so hard that she could not even get CLOSE to putting it in!! Well, she eventually talked him into relaxing a bit.

    Also wanted to add - Great Idea on the patch thing.

  10. #10

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    The one I found to be the easiest is rather thick like the nurophen. Its one of the chemist brands. I don't like to use nurophen. After a 2 am trip to the ER after DH took some a few years back its turned me off. he reacted to teh ibprohen in it & had serve stomach cramps. They thought he had appendisitis.

    I actually managed to get her to take it tonight. Evan had some & she was keen to copy! She had about 1/2 before I had to force the rest down with out too much trouble but she objected once she realised what it was.

  11. #11

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    Aww how sweet. Is that something that should be said when talking about that. LOL. Ok, how very cute of the little boy. And I don't blame him at all for clenching up.

  12. #12

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    Was intressted and found this on the web ...

    International Pharmaceutics Target on Private Healthcare Market ( 2007-12-11 )
    Reported by Huang Yi-Hsin
    After a series of NHI price cuts, international drug manufacturers started directing efforts to private healthcare market. New OTC products have been introduced into the market in the previous quarter by many international drug manufacturers, including Wyeth, GSK and Novartis.
    Panadol, manufactured by GSK, is a well-know pain and cold relief medicine in Taiwan. GSK launched Panadol Patch in the OTC market in August 2006. Within a year, this product has become the best selling product in its category. Hsieh Chia-Rong from the GSK expressed that Panadol Patch is distinct from other patches for external use because it contains diclofenac sodium and is categorized as an instruction drug
    GSK increased the proportion of OTC products from the end of last year. So far, Panadol Patch accounted for under 10% of the total OTC market; and GSK hopes to increase its market share by using its brand assets.
    Wyeth Taiwan also drew their attention to the OTC market for cold-relief products as the OTC market has been expanding over the past few years. Wyeth Taiwan has had a 10% annual growth in the OTC market over the past five years.
    As for Novartis, since the OTC department became autonomous, the sales have increased by 30% in China. Novatis Taiwan expressed that though prescription drugs are still their major market, the OTC department is very active and they already launched two new products this autumn, hoping to boost the sales by 10%.
    The BNHI announced the 5th PV survey recheck results in October and cut drug expenditures by NT$6 billion. Adding up the previous announcement, total NT$15 billion was squeezed from drug procurements. Under the circumstance, the OTC market may become another major battle ground for drug manufacturers.
    【2007-12-11/ Economic Daily /Page C8】

    Now if you can only GET some

  13. #13

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    FJ if you can get your DH to hold her, you can slip the syringe into the corner of her mouth and squirt it in and at the same time stroke her throat with your hand. Stroking her throat will stimulate her to swallow.

    If you are alone with her then wrap her up in a blanket so she can't wack the syringe away with her hand.

    I must say I do like the suppository idea. Slip it in when you're doing a nappy change and she'll never know

  14. #14

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    Paige was like that and I was really loathe to subject her to suppositories. We just rode it out in the end and now she is OK to take it. I remember though when we were little that Mum would mix it with a teaspoon of jam and give it to us that way.

  15. #15

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    Just a quick one - apparently amber teething necklaces are a "natural" alternative to panadols. I have ordered one but havent' tried it yet. Not sure if it works but worth a try I guess, good luck!

  16. #16

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    yeah I have seen those but don't really want to spend that kind of money on something that *may or may not* work KWIM

  17. #17
    morgan78 Guest

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    Have you tried the teething relief tablets they dissolve the instant they hit the tongue so cant be spat out. Also have you tried putting the Panadol in a small amount of water and giving it as a drink?
    Good luck

  18. #18

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    Grace also hates panadol and will spit it out (and that's only if we even get a chance to get it in), but she will happily take nurofen...i figure it mustn't taste as foul. I don't give it to her very often so i figure nurofen is ok occasionally. Although if panadol was really needed i would probably be getting suppositories for ease of use, they wouldn't even notice during a nappy change.

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