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Thread: 3hr 1st labour, scared 2nd will be at home

  1. #1
    ttcno2 Guest

    Default 3hr 1st labour, scared 2nd will be at home

    my first child was born after a 3 hour labour, and im due in august this year.
    im scared how fast it is going to be...mostly scared ill be home, or be on my own.
    is there anyway i can get some info about what to do - if this happens, and of course it may not - if i am on my own..i mean what are the basics i should know about birth without a midwife/doctor..iykwim


  2. #2

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    I'm no expert, but I think even with a quick first labour & birth, you might have a longer one second time around? (I know my Mum did, she went 2 hrs, 2.5hrs, 20mins, 3hrs with her 4 births)

    Perhaps when you book in at your hospital, you can talk to the midwives there about whether they're happy for you to come in immediately as soon as you know you're in labour, given your history?

    Maybe arm yourself with plenty of information? Most first aid books discuss emergency deliveries; and there is always '000' to talk you through it. And if in doubt and you dont think you're gonna make it to the hospital - call an ambulance.

    Also, can you have someone on call? Do you have a friend or family member nearby that you can call on to come straight over?

  3. #3

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    my labours were 3hrs 20 mins, and 4hrs 10 mins. (My third was emerg c/s at 30 weeks) so mine got longer... my advice is to have a ambulance membership!!

  4. #4
    ttcno2 Guest

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    hmm, good point about the ambulance membership simone! might check that now..
    its good to hear 2nd labours that werent shorter...everyone said last time how lucky i was, and i know i was in many ways, but it was also a bit traumatic as i didnt have any break between contractions at all, just woke up and bang, agony for the whole time and i felt quite freaked out and out of control..
    the thing im most worried about is if the cord is round bubs neck, ive heard you're supposed to stop pushing? but then what?? are you supposed to try and unwind it?? can you imagine trying to do that on your own!!

  5. #5

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    My first was I think about 2 1/2 hours or something like that, but I was induced. I made the mistake of not going to the hospital at the first sign of labour with my second and nearly had her in the car. The actual labour was longer - 3 1/4 hours, but I only made it to the hospital by the skin of my teeth and the doctor wasn't there or anything..
    My advice is go to the hospital at the first sign of labour! The first real contraction!

  6. #6

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    I believe you can get pregnancy books with directions on how to deliver your baby at home if you are stuck. (Or how your husband can help you.) Mine are all packed away right now or I'd look it up, so I could pass along the info for you. I believe if the cord is around baby's neck, you are supposed to try to get a finger under it and slip it over his head. (and no, I don't know how you would do that yourself in the middle of labour!)
    But, all that being said, it's pretty unlikely that this will happen to you - don't stress hun!
    You know you might have a short labour, so you can be prepared! Make sure you always have someone to contact in your last weeks - if DH is out of reach, have a family member on call, or a neighbour. Have the emergency numbers posted by the phone (you might forget even the easy ones under stress). Keep your bags packed and ready to go.
    I had a 7 hour labour from start to finish with my first, and I was also a little worried that the next one would come too fast, especially since the hospital was 30 min away, and DH was working 1 hour away at the time. I was sure that by the time I knew I was for sure in labour, and called him (and his cell was not working reliably either! :eek: ) and he got home, got changed (very dirty when he comes home from work) brought Elyse to MIL's (on the way to the hospital) and we got to the hospital, we'd have the baby in the ditch!
    But it all worked out beautifully! I went into labour when Dh was at home, everything stayed fairly light and manageable until well after we got to the hospital, and Marieke was born after 7 hours of labour, just like Elyse.
    So don't get too worried about it - you might go quickly, but at least this time you will know, and so you can plan and get ready. All the best!

  7. #7

    Join Date
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    Many second labours are shorter though (of course circumstances can come into play which can slow it down), have supported a woman who's first labour was 4 hours, her second was no more than 2 (from first contraction) and I missed the birth it was that quick...

    If labour is going fast, getting on your hands and knees can help to slow things down a little. You'll obviously need to have some towels handy to keep bub warm, a piece of string and scissors for cutting the cord when you are ready, I think Alan might have posted before about what you'd need? I will see if I can find it.
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children

    BellyBelly Birth & Early Parenting Immersion - Find out how to have a BETTER, more confident birth experience... guaranteed!
    Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know

  8. #8

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    Hi Ttcno2
    Put together a home birth kit. This kit can be very simple. Scissors. 2 pieces of string/cord something like shoelaces are fine. At least 3 towels.

    Make sure that you have phone numbers for DH/support person, friend, neighbour, Hospital, Ambulance, next to the phone.

    When your contractions are 20 minutes apart and if you are on your own, phone people on your phone list including the ambulance. Go to the hospital.

    If things progress quickly and you think that you may give birth at home here I what to do.

    DO NOT PANIC
    Get your home birth kit
    Phone the ambulance 000
    Unlock your front door
    Find a place you feel comfortable.
    If you have a large mirror use that so you can see what it happening
    Listen to your body, it will tell you what is happening and what to do
    Do not push because you feel that you want to. (When the urge to push comes you will not be able to resist)
    As the babyís head is being born you will feel a burning sensation (often called a ring of fire). This is your peri stretching. This is the time you want to slow the birth down if you can it will reduce the chance o you tearing.
    When your babyís head is born put 2 fingers inside at the front and touch the babyís shoulder.
    Slide your fingers from the tip o your babyís shoulder to its ear touching its skin all the way.
    If you feel the cord lift it over the babyís head.
    Sometimes the cord is too tight to move. I this happens do not worry, leave it alone and follow the guide below for not being able to feel for a cord.

    If you are unable to feel for a cord do not worry.
    When your babyís head is born, hold the head against your bottom and let the body slide out whilst keeping the head as lose to your vagina as possible. This should reduce the chance of the cord tearing if it around your babyís neck.
    Should the or tear again do not panic. Grab the cord coming from the baby. (At this stage you o not need to worry about the cord coming from the placenta).
    The cord will be bleeding you need to stop this bleeding, you can o this by squeezing the chord and then tying some string around it. Make sure the knot is tight. You can tie more than one piece o sting if you need to. You can even tie the cord in a knot.

    After your baby is born put him/her on your chest.
    Cover him/her with a couple of towels and start to dry your baby.
    If your baby is not breathing you need to be rough when drying him/her.

    Next check your bleeding.
    Donít forget that you have not yet stopped the bleeding from the cord that is attached to the placenta so donít get this mixed up with the blood coming from your vagina. If the bleeding is not heavy then everything is going well. There is no need to stop the bleeding from the cord attached to the placenta however there will be a lot of blood coming from it and it can cause a hell of a mess.

    Change the towels covering you and your baby. A baby that is wet looses heat very quickly.
    By this time hopefully the ambos have arrived.

    I hope this helps

    If you have any more questions just ask

  9. #9

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    Wow, so much to think of... i could barely remember my own name during the birthing let alone all that LOL!! But i suppose you do what you have to do...

  10. #10

    Join Date
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    I'd love to put all this into an article - if anyone has not had time to get to hospital for the birth, can you please email me at [email protected]
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children

    BellyBelly Birth & Early Parenting Immersion - Find out how to have a BETTER, more confident birth experience... guaranteed!
    Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know

  11. #11

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    Ooooh, that would be a great read Kelly

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