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Thread: Article: Timing of cord clamping

  1. #1

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    Default Article: Timing of cord clamping

    More evidence...



    Timing of cord clamping revisited - Journal of Perinatal Medicine , vol 34, no 4, 2006, pp 293-297 Levy T; Blickstein I - (2006) Although cord cutting has been performed since the beginning of mankind, the timing and advantages of early versus delayed cord clamping are still controversial. Early cord clamping (within the first 30 s after birth) is usually justified for potential prevention of postpartum hemorrhage and for immediate treatment of the newborn, but at the same time, may increase Rh-sensitization. Delayed cord clamping is performed after a period of 30 s during which 'placental transfusion' of approximately 80 mL of blood occurs. This amount seems to protect the baby from childhood anemia without increasing hypervolemia-related risks. In preterm infants, delayed clamping appears to reduce the risk of intraventricular hemorrhage and the need for neonatal transfusion. Obtaining cord blood for future autologous transplantation of stem cells needs early clamping and seems to conflict with the infant's best interest. Although a tailored approach is required in the case of cord clamping, the balance of available data suggests that delayed cord clamping should be the method of choice. (32 references) (Author)
    Kelly xx

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  2. #2

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    I fully agree and have ensured this was the case with all of my four live births. Unfortunately in a system where the placenta is artificially managed this often doesn't happen. There seems to be a rush to disconnect the baby and mother and placenta. This I believe stemmed from the need to 'get on with things' that in the past (and still in many) in many hospitals was deemed necessary.

    More and more women now though are asking for the cord to remain intact. As you will have seen many practitioners are quick to cut a cord that is looped around a baby's neck rather than gently manipulating it to leave the baby's cord in tact. (Please, I am not suggesting that there is not occasion where this is necessary!) Two of my four live births have had cords around their necks, with an experienced midwife to pop it over the cord was left undamaged as was my request.

  3. #3

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    I have requested this time that the cord be left until it stops pulsating. The midwives have all advised me that there are reasons for clamping and I have told them they can discuss the options with DH when the time comes. No I have compiled 4 articles so far about the cord clamping & put them into a file for DH to read & discuss so he knows when the time comes exactly what our choices are.

  4. #4

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    I really don't get how its such a big deal! Seth's cord was left to pulsate and it wasn't *that* much longer didn't impact greatly on anyone as I had to deliver the placenta anyway, and Seth was able to lie on my chest still attatched. I read something that the amount of blood to go back into the baby is 150-250 mls :eek: Now if I'm not going to donate that I don't see why it would be better off in the bin... how could it be? If the cord blood is found to be such a miracle cure why would I not want it to go back into my baby! The only times I would want it done is if it were causing problems with birth, around the neck and couldn't be slipped off or was too short to allow bonding whilst it pulsated iykwim? In which case if it were possible I would want it donated.

    *hugs*
    Cailin
    Last edited by Rouge; September 1st, 2006 at 01:50 PM.

  5. #5

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    Absolutely Calin! Why on earth would you bin it???!!! Largely as that's what has been done for a long time. It challenges what is now the "norm" in some places and that is always a bit of a hard slog! MY placentas are usually born within 10-30 minutes of the birth and then the cord is cut.

  6. #6

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    I will be investigating an extended attachment this time around. it wasn't something I even thought about last time, so I will definitly mention it to the FBU midwife next week and see if there is an issue.
    I can't imagine there will be - I personally dont want to leave it for 30mins, but I've got no problem with a few minutes. Especially if it helps the next bubs.
    I have a funny feeling that our hossy only collects cords for donation on certain days of the week? Does that sound wierd?
    Anyway - All good questions for the midwife. I have already discussed it with shane, and he didn't give a hoot if I wanted to leave it on for a while, as long as there were no complications of course.

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    Next time Shannon..... Is there an update we haven't heard

  8. #8

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    This can even happen in a caesarean. The do like to make things quick, smooth and time efficient, but you can say that this is what you want and you want to hold the baby while they close... you may need to dig your heels in for it but its worth it
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children
    Author of Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know
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  9. #9

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    I've read a few articles on the links between anemia in utero and early post partum and later development of autism and that is enough to convince me that my babies will be attached as long as they need to to get all the blood they need!

    My boss was dangerousely anemic when pregnant and has an autistic son and I know of 4 other women who have been anemic during pregnancy and had kids with autism spectrum disorders.

    It's one of those small steps you can take to help give baby the best possible start IMHO.

  10. #10

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    We left Tehya attached to her cord until it ceased pulsating about 30 minutes later. The pulse of it was so strong I could feel it resting on my leg. Plus leaving her attached meant no handing her over for anyone else to cuddle

    Cailin, I agree totally about leaving bub attached. if cord blood is so precious that they like it donated then why shouldn't our own babies get the complete benefits from it. Afterall it is there blood.

    I have also read that when bub takes it's first breath blood is taken from other parts of the body to go to the lungs for them to inflate etc. If bub is still attached to his/her cord then the extra blood is already in there and there is no need for it come from other organs.

    Dr's will say sometimes that there is a rush to cut the cord to help baby breath when actually the better thing to do is to leave them attached, atleast this way they are still getting oxygen into their bodies, iykwim. Babies weight and length are going to change within 30 minutes or even an hour so there is no rush for statistical tests to be done.

  11. #11

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    Hi Expat,
    This is totally unrelated to the topic, but I saw you were an ex Melbourne girl living in Sweden and just wanted to ask you a question!! My husband is from Sweden and he is really keen to move back there but I am a little nervous about the whole thing!! How did you go with the language barrier and settling in over there?? Can we chat on msn maybe?? [email protected]

  12. #12

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    moving to news forum
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children
    Author of Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know
    Follow me in 2015 as I go Around The World + Kids!
    Forever grateful to my incredible Mod Team and many wonderful members who have been so supportive since 2003.

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