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thread: Very windy BF* baby

  1. #1
    Registered User

    Sep 2007
    Brisbane
    5,729

    Very windy BF* baby

    DD2 is exclusively fed EBM and the nurses have commented on how windy she is. What causes wind in a BF* baby? They said she is the windiest baby on the ward and also the hardest baby they've ever had to burp. Basically they can't make her burp and she builds up a lot of gas before farting it out hours later. At the moment it is getting in the way of her feeding because she refuses to swallow when she has wind pain. Any ideas? Am I eating the wrong thing? Is there something wrong with my BM?



    *I am not sure if she is technically "BF" or not. But she gets only BM, delivered either by her ng tube (no air involved) or by a bottle.

  2. #2
    Registered User

    Mar 2007
    6,979

    Is the teat right for her?
    Nope, definitely nothing wrong with your BM
    Are you eating foods that could be causing gas?

  3. #3
    Registered User

    Sep 2007
    Brisbane
    5,729

    I'm eating fairly standard foods. Lots of fruit and veges, a fair amount of carbs. I do still eat small amounts of dairy, chocolate etc, could that be enough? What foods cause wind? I haven't been farting .

  4. #4
    Registered User

    Apr 2006
    Perth
    4,203

    citrus, tomato, onion, leek etc can all cause tummy problems. Caffeine too

  5. #5
    Registered User

    Sep 2007
    Brisbane
    5,729

    citrus, tomato, onion, leek etc can all cause tummy problems. Caffeine too
    OK I don't eat any of those, except the caffeine. I have one cup of tea a day (immediately after I express) and one cup of coffee a week. Plus a few squares of chocolate a day. Are babies that sensitive? I never got this far with DD1 so I have no idea about BF friendly diets.

  6. #6
    2014 BellyBelly RAK Recipient.

    Mar 2010
    1,200

    Any of the brassica family cause alot of wind and digestive problems. Cauliflower, broccoli, leek, onion, garlic, cabbage, kale turnips. Also chocolate and caffeine will affect them.

  7. #7
    Registered User

    Apr 2006
    Perth
    4,203

    I wouldn't have thought that would be anywhere near enough to bother her.

    Could it just be that her little digestive system isn't strong enough yet? DDs 1 and 2 almost never burped. DD3 has only just started burping but most of her wind still works its way out the bottom end. I'm being really careful with what I'm eating given issues in the past, but DD3 is still a windy bub. Maybe its just an individual baby thing? Have the nurses suggested anything you can do?

    Sorry - none of that is helpful.

  8. #8
    BellyBelly Member

    May 2008
    1,110

    And some babies are just really windy. Does she have a dummy? Sucking on things can help dispel wind - though there may be other good reasons not to introduce one.

  9. #9
    Registered User

    Oct 2007
    Middle Victoria
    8,924

    http://www.koraorganics.com/blog/liv...ding-mums-eat/


    What on Earth can Breastfeeding Mums Eat
    The other day I saw a list of foods a breastfeeding mother ‘should’ avoid. The list was long, a whole page. Mums were passing it onto each other willy nilly and drastically adapting their diets in a quest to conjure up the perfect no-cry baby. No spinach, peas, cabbage or gassy foods, they might give baby wind (impossible, breastmilk is made from what passes into the mum’s blood, not what’s in her tummy). Caffeine and dairy, nope, can’t have those either: ‘Just a soy decaf latte please, I’m breastfeeding’. Others wondered whether they should be breastfeeding at all if it meant cutting out simple pleasures like chocolate and coffee, or their pizza and beer ritual on Friday nights. It really isn’t meant to be that hard.

    Babies in India whose mothers eat spicy curries every day do just fine. Babies in Germany where sauerkraut is a staple also do just fine. Women who eat greasy chips for breakfast, hamburgers for lunch, Chinese takeaway for dinner and snack on lollies and soft drinks all day will still be meeting their babies’ nutritional needs (even though they may feel crap because of all the junk they’ve put in their mouths, but that’s not my point). Exclusively breastfed babies in developing countries where the mum is malnourished also do very well while they are still nurslings. Get where I’m going here? And have you noticed the latest marketing trick in formula ads? They LOVE pointing out all the supposed dietary restrictions you have to endure when breastfeeding — and so perpetuating the myth that to successfully breastfeed, you have to miss out on all the foods you love and enjoy.

    What about if you want to lose weight? Mums are told not to diet while breastfeeding, but think about it, if a starving woman in a third world country can make enough milk for her baby, then cutting a few calories isn’t going to greatly affect your supply. If you wanted to stick to healthy guidelines, aiming to lose about half a kilo a week is a sensible diet option, with no drastic side-effects to the energy levels of a new mum.

    Just a few more food myths to bust. Avoiding common allergens like peanuts, wheat or dairy when you are breastfeeding doesn’t mean your child won’t develop allergies to these foods when they start eating themselves. And banned foods in pregnancy — soft cheeses, sushi and alcohol — if you’re breastfeeding, go for it! If you do pick up a food poisoning bug, you are not passing it to your baby directly via blood like you would if still attached via the umbilical cord, and the alcohol level from the odd ****tail is so diluted in the breastmilk, it’s hardly detectible.

    Now I do have to put my little disclaimer here at the end. Yes, there ARE some babies who have food sensitivities, and since everything you eat and drink passes through to your baby via your milk, it is possible they can cause bubs to be unsettled. But this is unlikely and not the norm. If you do have a baby who is crying A LOT, it’s worth exploring this option, but remember, it’s normal for babies and children to have one unsettled period every 24 hours (often called the witching hour) and changing your whole diet in these instances isn’t going to magically fix that. So be sensible people. Don’t blame breastfeeding for everything and have a chocky biscuit for me.

    If you think your child IS sensitive to foods through your breastmilk, check out the Australian Breastfeeding Association website: http://www.breastfeeding.asn.au/bfinfo/restless.html

  10. #10
    Registered User

    Sep 2007
    Brisbane
    5,729

    There are no meds we can give her, she is too young. And she has a dummy but only for very select times, because she is so low on energy we don't want her expending energy for non nutritive sucking unless it is associated with an ng tube feed. Oh well, I guess I'll just clamp down the diet even more and give it time. Nothing else I can do!

  11. #11
    Registered User

    Sep 2007
    Brisbane
    5,729

  12. #12
    Registered User

    Oct 2007
    Middle Victoria
    8,924

    I was abit slow, and others beat me to it. i would consider other things before your diet. prematurity, individuality...

  13. #13
    BellyBelly Member

    Sep 2010
    North West Victoria, Australia
    3,003

    It could take DD an hour to burp once she started on oral feeds. She was terrible. She did get better after a few months. She's now 19mos and thinks burping is hilarious. Silly munchkin.

    It is cheating, but if you are given a syringe you can actually get the air out of her belly by drawing it up the NGT.

  14. #14
    Registered User

    Sep 2007
    Brisbane
    5,729

    It could take DD an hour to burp once she started on oral feeds. She was terrible. She did get better after a few months. She's now 19mos and thinks burping is hilarious. Silly munchkin.

    It is cheating, but if you are given a syringe you can actually get the air out of her belly by drawing it up the NGT.
    OK phew maybe it is just a premmie thing.

    I might ask them to draw gas up her ng tube half way through a suck feed. One nurse has done it but I'm not sure if they are all keen.

  15. #15
    2014 BellyBelly RAK Recipient.

    Mar 2010
    1,200


    In my experience the foods I mentioned above has changed the outcome for their baby for every single client I have worked with. I agree that some people can find it a little over the top. But most women in countries all over the world (including India) adapt their diets in the first six weeks of life, some things are not broken down well by the mother (listed foods) I know it is very difficult to do it when you are tired and have anew baby, but if it makes a difference to how they settle why not give it a go if it changes the outcome it's totally worth it, then keeping eating what can possibly be causing the disturbance. It won't be long and you can eat all of those things again, the first 6 -12 weeks are the most sensitive period on their gut.

  16. #16
    BellyBelly Member

    Sep 2010
    North West Victoria, Australia
    3,003

    Yeah, I got told off for doing it once.

    Maybe laying her against your chest and sitting as upright as possible? That's the only way DS will burp. The other way he will burp is by holding him against my chest and walking around or rocking side to side. Which would be hard in the SCN, but might be something to try. Is DD2 hooked up to any monitors or anything that would stop you from at least standing up with her?

  17. #17
    Registered User
    Add leckert on Facebook Follow leckert On Twitter

    Mar 2008
    still on the teaching contract roundabout
    1,952

    Ds2 doesn't like burping (and didn't like farting) for quite some time. I cut out cabbage as he seemed to have a really unsettled night after I had some in a chow mein dish. I also took ds2 to the Chiro which helped (he kept getting gas stuck in his intestine).
    Getting gas out for us included bicycling legs, squashing ds2 in half almost (sounds worse than it is) and rolling ds2's legs in a clockwise circle going over his tummy with his legs and massaging his tummy in a clockwise direction.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk so may not make sense

  18. #18
    BellyBelly Life Subscriber

    Jan 2006
    11,633

    It won't be long and you can eat all of those things again, the first 6 -12 weeks are the most sensitive period on their gut.
    I always wonder if it's the immature gut, and not the mother's diet, and that's why it sorts itself out in that time frame?

    Lots of good suggestions for helping her feel more comfortable here - hope it eases as she grows

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