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Thread: PCOS is...

  1. #1

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    Default PCOS is...

    Hi all, Some info i thought might help those who are not familiar with PCOS:

    Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is also known as: polycystic ovaries; sclerocystic ovarian disease; polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD); Stein-Leventhal Syndrome.
    PCOS is actually a misnomer, because it onlyrefers to one of many symptoms associated with this disorder. It affects between 5 to 10%of all women and is one of the leading causes of infertility.



    Symptoms can be mild or severe, and can vary widely from woman to woman. This is part of the reason doctors often miss the diagnosis. Someone with PCOS may have one or all of the following symptoms in varying degrees:

    - irregular periods: abnormal, irregular, heavy or scanty (oligomenorrhea)
    - absent periods (amenorrhea)
    - ovarian cysts
    - hirsutism (excess facial and/or body hair)
    - alopecia (male-pattern hair loss)
    - obesity
    - acne
    - skin tags
    - acanthosis nigricans (brown skin patches, often found on the nape of the neck)
    - high cholesterol levels
    - high blood pressure
    - exhaustion and/or lack of mental alertness
    - decreased sex drive
    - excess "male" hormones, such as androgens, DHEAS, or testosterone
    - infertility
    - decreased breast size
    - enlarged clitoris(rare)
    - enlarged ovaries
    - enlarged uterus
    Note that symptoms can worsen over time or with weight gain.

    If you suspect you have PCOS Go straight to an endocrinologist. They specialize in glandular disorders; in this case, the gland in question is the pancreas, which is overproducing insulin. Seeing an OB/GYN is only really useful if you are trying to get pregnant and, even then, a reproductive endocrinologist would probably be better informed.

    SO WHAT IS PCOS:

    The root of PCOS is an inability to respond properly to insulin, the hormone produced in the pancreas that allows your body's cells to absorb energy from the food you eat. This means your cells don't respond to the normal amount of insulin, so the pancreas pumps out even more. That's what insulin resistance is and it happens when the body turns carbohydrates, both simple and complex, into glucose that surges into the bloodstream. Insulin travels to the muscle cells, telling them to take glucose from the bloodstream and store it in the liver. As
    insulin levels in the blood increase, glucose levels in the blood decrease. When blood glucose falls below a certain level, the brain, which needs glucose to function, calls out for more by telling you to eat again. If it doesn't get glucose, the result is drowsiness or lack of mental alertness. This glucose shortage is also known as low blood sugar or hypoglycemia. When hypoglycemia strikes, the liver is unable to replenish bloodglucose from its stored supply because eating a carbohydrate-rich meal or drinking a sugary beverage creates an exaggerated
    insulin response that prevents delivery of the glucose. So, insulin remains in the bloodstream,sending messages to store more body fat and preventing the release of already-stored fat, and glucose remains in the liver instead of going to the brain. In addition, the high levels of insulin stimulate the ovaries to produce large amounts of the male hormone testosterone, which may prevent the ovaries from releasing an egg each month, causing infertility. High testosterone levels in women also cause acne, male-pattern baldness, and excess hair growth. Last but not least, it is the insulin problem that puts us at increased risk for diabetes as well as heart disease.

    IF YOU HAVE PCOS:

    If you are currently overweight, the first step is to lose the excess pounds, because many symptoms of PCOS improve or even disappear entirely at normal weight. Since the cause of all the problems is insulin resistance, the key seems to lie in restricting carbohydrates and exercising regularly, for physical activity also helps regulate insulin production. The most popular of the low-carb diets are 'Dr Atkins' New Diet Revolution' by Robert Atkins and 'Protein Power' by Michael and Mary Eades. Another popular approach is the 'Carbohydrate Addicts Diet' by Rachel and Richard Heller. Even at normal weight, it is still critical to moderate
    carbohydrate intake as well as exercise. This is simply going to have to be a way of life, since PCOS cannot be cured, only held in check. Although many women have reported great success through low-carbing and exercise alone, a growing number of women with PCOS are now being treated with so-called diabetic drugs, such as Metformin (AKA Glucophage). There have been several studies reporting good results in treating PCOS with Metformin. However - and this is very important! - Metformin is only meant to be taken temporarily. The goal is to use
    Metformin in conjunction with diet and exercise to lose excess weight


    If you would like anymore information please feel free to ask.
    Being a pass sufferer of Cysits at the age of 11 till 15 I understand how extremely painful PCOS must be. It is something that should be diagnosed quickly and delt with

  2. #2

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    Default Thats me!

    I was diagnosed with PCOS when I was 16 after I put on a HUGE amount of weight in a short period of time, and I had strange cycles and lots of ovarian cysts.

    Just would like to add too...You can have poly cystic ovaries and not have PCOS and you can be normal weight with PCOS too.

    If you want to vent I would be happy to listen, I am sure I can do some venting too

    *hugs*
    Cailin

  3. #3

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    Default

    Hello Cailin,
    Im not too sure about PCOS. I only know what I have researched, so thank you for telling me about it from your personal experience.
    I was very lucky to not put on weight when i had cysits. Mind you the only reason i didnt was because my cysits burst before they were able to get any bigger. I was told at 11 to go on the pill to stop ovulation. but never did, a young girl that age would never think twice about using a contraceptive! But they stopped coming some years later and after being told if they didnt stop im risking my fertility, was enough to scare me.
    I was not told anything about PCOS at the time. So I guess I never had it.

    You may vent all you like too..hehe its what these forums are for I guess.

    Take care,

  4. #4

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    Default Me too!

    I was told to go on the pill at 16, after a whole heap of test and cysts and what not. So I did. And I strongly believe its what helped me to concieve Paris. We were very lucky. I have been off the pill for about 6 mths, I was too lazy to get another prescription as I knew we would be ttc soon and alot of my symptoms have come back and I have had a cyst since then too. Great fun NOT! I hope I fall pg soon...then I won't have to worry about all this garbage!

    *hugs*
    Cailin

  5. #5

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    Default

    That was one issue that scared me ALOT. If i stopped any contraceptive i would have them start again. I did start taking the pill not long after they stopped the first time. And that was a few years ago and have always been on something. I was on 6 different pill tablets and they all had shocking side effects and so i went to the implant. That was even worse. However no side effects but having my period for 6 weeks was enough to call that one quits. So now i am on Depo injections and think there fantastic. I would recomened them to anyone. How ever i am having trouble atm with my uterus. First it was endometriosis then this then that so the injection messed with that and i was considering stopping all conraceptives and giving myself a rest. However i was told not to as i have a very good chance the cystis's would come back.. that was enough for me to decide to stick with the injections.
    So im still going through alot of tests now and im really not enjoying being a women at this moment!

  6. #6

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    ***BIG HUGS***

    I hope all the tests go well. Even if they just find out what is causing things so that you can start to look at ways how to deal with it. I found it better knowing what was wrong and knowing I wasn't alone, that just trying to deal with it kwim?

    *hugs*
    Cailin

  7. #7

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    Default

    Yes i guess your right. I just find it so hard that doctors tell you its 100 different things before they find out its somethings else. especially when your paying a heap of money. I have just had surgery for endometriosis and that cost a couple grand and it wasnt even it. I tests before hand that could of said what it was but he didnt wait long enough t find out and just went ahead with the surgery. So i have another appointment next thursday because i have been getting worse with very bad dizzy spells.

    But its great to know that im not the only one out there and people are very supportive.

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