thread: ARTICLE: passive smoking affects IVF success rates

  1. #1
    BellyBelly Member

    Sep 2004
    1,551

    ARTICLE: passive smoking affects IVF success rates

    May 26, 2005 — LONDON (Reuters) - Smoldering cigarettes can be just as damaging as smoking to women having fertility treatment, according to research published on Thursday.

    Doctors know that smoking can affect a woman's fertility and damage sperm but scientists in Canada have found that exposure to second-hand smoke can affect the success rates of treatments such as in-vitro fertilisation (IVF).

    In a study that compared the outcomes of fertility treatment, they found smokers and women who lived with smokers had about a 20 percent pregnancy rate per embryo transfer, compared to 48 percent for non-smokers.

    "Although we do need a prospective confirmatory study, the findings from our study warrant a warning to women to reduce or, if possible, prevent exposure to cigarette smoking, especially if they are trying to conceive," said Professor Warren Foster, of McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada.

    The researchers, who reported their findings in the journal Human Reproduction, said there was no difference in the quality of the embryos from the three groups of women but they found a vast variation in the number of embryos that successfully implanted in the womb.

    "This was the most striking finding from our study," said lead researcher Michael Neal.



    "When it came to implantation rates… we found that while non-smokers achieved a 25 percent implantation rate, both smokers and side-stream smokers managed only around 12 percent."

    Side-stream smoke is emitted from the smoldering end of the cigarette and contains the most toxic constituents. Passive smoking includes side-stream smoking and smoke exhaled by the woman's partner.

    Smokers in the study smoked a mean 11 cigarettes a day.

    The researchers do not understand why there is such a difference in implanting and maintaining a pregnancy in the smoking groups, despite the good quality and appearance of the embryos. They are planning a further study to try to answer the question.



  2. #2
    BellyBelly Life Member

    Jan 2005
    in the valley of cuddles with mountains of smiles
    2,369

    Saw similar article in Sydney Daily telegraph yesterday - my Dh said to blame my parents now (not we live with them)

  3. #3
    BellyBelly Member

    Sep 2004
    1,551

    both my parents smoked as a child, but Im assuming it means whilst you are undergoing fertility treatment....

    Convinces me to send on to a friend who is trying and whose DH still smokes.

    A drop from 48% to like 20% is pretty significant!


    Keen

  4. #4
    BellyBelly Life Subscriber

    Jan 2005
    2hrs from Sydney, NSW
    1,187

    Very intesting... also doesn't help I guess when some smokers won't (or can't) give up smoking before TTC, and some continue to smoke during & after pregnancy, poor bubs.

    Funny thing is, my mum had 4 children, (me being the 2nd) & she smoked through every pregnancy but with me, coz everytime she lit up, she felt like throwin up. Thing is, I never smoked & both my brother & sister did. My elder brother died when he was 2 so never know if he would've been a smoker. I was destined to be a non-smoker & I can't stand the smell of it, especially when people smoke right in front of you & you have no-where to go.

  5. #5
    BellyBelly Life Subscriber

    Feb 2005
    1,244

    Hi Girls,

    DH smokes but has never smoked in the house or near me (I have asthma and he knows I also can't stand the smell of it). He's been on the patches now for almost a month so I have got great hope that he will give up this time. I know you can't force someone but I said to him that we were spending a fortune on IVF and it would be stupid to blow it through him continuing to smoke. We can't take the chance. I also said it would make it easier if he quit now before a baby arrives.

    Fingers crossed for him to continue the treatment. He's got a way to go.

    (edited to add that I'm very sorry about your brother, Shell. It must have been a terrible loss for your family.)

  6. #6
    BellyBelly Member

    Sep 2004
    1,551

    Mel - a big congratulations to him for even trying! Am sure he will nip it in the butt just in time... \/


    Keen

  7. #7
    BellyBelly Life Subscriber

    Jan 2005
    2hrs from Sydney, NSW
    1,187

    Thanks Mel, although I was only 3.5mths old, so I kinda kept the family together, but parents separated when I was 17, divorced now & Dad remarried, but yes my brother is a sore point, even for me, long story.

    My DH used to smoke too, he quit twice or maybe 3 times.
    1st: substituted smokes for choc paddle pops (lasted few years)
    2nd: went cold turkey
    3rd: occasionally caught him hiding smokes in the shed & denying he was smoking, but we had a serious talk & he's off em now. His family has a history of emphasima & his dad died of lung cancer (probably from passive smoking), now he assures me he's off 'em for good.

    Good luck to your DH. It certainly makes a big difference, eg: kissing, clothes/hair smell, house smells cleaner...