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Thread: Nannies

  1. #1

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    Default Nannies

    Just wondering if anyone has or would hire a nanny?

    How often would/do you have the nanny come?

    What would/do you pay?

    Does anyone know of nannies in Adelaide?


  2. #2

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    Danni, friends of ours hired a nanny as their son (who is now 1) was very premmie and is very prone to illness. They are very happy with her and it works well for them. For me, I send DS to day care as I like the social aspect of it for him and he loves it too. I think preschool and school will be easier for him as he is used to being around other kids and adults.

  3. #3

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    Danni, I am not using a nanny, but have been one in the past!

    I currently work for Dial an Angel, who could help you find a nanny. There are other agencies like Nanny SA as well. I'm sure there are others too.

    For me, the advantages of having a nanny over day care include;
    * less chance of illness from other kids
    *individual attention- when they are hungry, tired, need to be held etc, they are ALWAYS the number one priority, which is not always the case with daycare.
    * you can expose your child to many more things- you can ask the nanny to take them to swimming, gymbaroo, library etc, which they don't do in daycare.
    * when your child is sick, you don't need to take time off work to care for them
    * your child stays in their familiar environment, with their toys, bed etc
    * Your child stays on their routine, not the centers eg; if they had a bad night, the nanny can let them sleep for longer, or if they slept a lot, the nanny can put them down later- often in a centre, the children are all on the same schedule, everyone goes for a sleep at 12.

    If I have to go back to work with this one, I would only feel comfortable using a nanny.

  4. #4

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    I haven't done it but it was one of the options we were considering for when I go back to work later this year - as we will have two in daycare so thought it might be more cost effective.
    Short answer - it's not. We'd need to have probably 3-4 kids before it would be competitive with daycare.
    Qualified nannies charge around $20 an hour - so if you work full time and need them there before you leave until you get home, say around 10 hours a day - that's $200 a day. So it can get rather expensive.
    I think it would definitely be viable if you had a few kids under school age, or could share with another mum which is another possibility.

  5. #5

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    I'm thinking about it but only because with shift work I think it might be better for DD. But the cost puts me off. It would mean that almost my entire pay would be spent on paying the nanny where as child care is much less...

  6. #6

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    Thank you for your responses to this. I'm just thinking about options when we have a baby. Another thing I've thought of is my sister is and wants to continue being a stay at home mum for the rest of her life and thought of her babysitting for a small fee as well, but her house isn't in the cleanest state and I'm not sure I would want my children in that environment.

  7. #7

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    Hi Danni, Have you looked at family day care? It's the closest (and most affordable) model of care to nannies. We were very choosy with finding the 'right' carer for DD and she is now a dear friend and DD is practically a family member in their home. The FDC scheme in each state is registered and monitored by centralised offices, who match families to carers and do the quality control checks, etc. They are allowed a maximum of 7 children in care (4-5 under five depending on the state) but in actual fact on most days there are fewer children present.

    HTH

  8. #8

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    I dont like the idea of a nanny cause I don't like the idea of a stranger alone with my child in my house that I don't know from a bar of soap.
    Having said that, I worked for years as a nanny and loved it
    Its too easy to get into an agency, the back ground check isn't near thorough enough and anyone can act like a good person and have a clear police history.
    I'm just not very trusting these days when it comes to children after all the terrible things we hear in the media about things happening to kids.
    In a day care environment there are more people around, more supervision, and I know that there are at least 2 workers in each room and nothing can happen behind closed doors like it can at home.
    I know this may sounds a little paranoid but this is my opinion and having been on the other side where i've seen how easy it is to become a nanny wth a registered agency I just wouldn't do it.
    Oh, and i was paid between 15 - 20 an hour depending on the family. Thats a lot of money just for child care!

    Oh, but I think a nanny is a great idea for a parent working from home where you're still around but the child is cared for while you are there and working. One of my jobs was like this and we all loved it, me, mum and children

  9. #9

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    I agree with Dee, I have gone through agencies as a nanny looking for work, and its just so easy to be placed with a family. The agency I went through just wanted blue card and that is it!!!!! I was placed with a family like *that*.

    I tend to think in extremes, but a nanny really could do ANYTHING and you wouldn't know until you got home... And seeing how easy it is... well, as a mum-to-be I would rather take them to a child care centre if I had to. If I worked from home it might be different though, a nanny would be REALLY handy!

    I think, if you were to get a nanny, go for one with First Aid, and a drivers license and vehile (in case of emergencies), some kind of child qualifiations, blue card, and references.

  10. #10

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    my cousin works in the film industry and she's had a nanny for her daughter (now 10) for nearly 10 years - the same nanny

    When back to work full-time (even 80%) & we have twins then we're getting a nanny.

    I'm not going to be like DH's brother & expect his mother to look after my children 24/7.

  11. #11
    mustard Guest

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    I have my second child in daycare two days a week ( the older one is at school). i think i felt more comfortable with that as i knew there was little control over who came into my house when i was not there ( ie someone visiting the nanny ). I wrote a big list of all the things i wanted in a daycare centre - sleeping arrangements, individual care, great homemade cooked food, small groups , general cleanlines of where they eat, sleep and nappy change area. Looked at 6 centres and was really amazed at what i viewed : - no hats at playtime, a massive beehive outside in one of the trees, a 3 month old baby in a swing unsupervised over the concrete floor.
    finally i was reccomended one and fell in love with it instantly. it is a community daycare centre ( not for profit) that we have been at for 3 years now. The same carers in al that time. My kids have not been sick at all. the food is fantastic ( roasts , homemade morning and afternnon tea )
    I have never had one instance to complain.

    the difficulty with using family is that when there is an issue it is really hard not to have a huge falling out.

    Good luck

    Mustard

    DD 02/03
    Ds 03/05

  12. #12

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    I worked as a nanny for many years and then as a preschool teacher (2 to 4 year olds) and now I'm a mum to a 5 month old and I can deffinately see advantages to both types of childcare.

    To blow my own trumpet, I was a super-nanny. I did laundry, cleaning, groceries, gardening, picked up drycleaning, took the kids to the beach, to mum-and-me, baked with them, made yummy homemade food and made them interested in ingredients and methods, supported and encouraged them, gave them limits and of course lots of love. I had all my 'mums' love me to bits except for one who loved me and then hated me but that was her own self esteem issue because I could do all the things she could but I could have time off! (!) -but we're friends now! I know other women who have been very dedicated nannies (one in particular who I worked with in Ireland was a saint) and plenty who feel it's a great job because all you have to do is make sure the kid gets fed and napped and not hurt themselves and you can sit around the rest of the time reading magazines and drinking coffee. Being a good nanny is a hard job because it's not just a 9-5 job. You can't help but be personally involved and fall in love with the kids. One sweet boy I used to look after loved to go for family bike rides and once asked his mum if I could go on the family bike rides with them...that was so touching! I only left them because their youngest would have been starting school soon and I needed to have a job with more hours than they could give me and where I'd pay tax and be part of the system.

    I was also once a shared nanny where 2 mums who are friends needed me 2-3 days each per week, so they'd get on the phone to each other and negotiate who would have me when and then one of them would call me and give me my weeks schedule...perfect! I ended up doing between 30-50 hours a week with those 2 and it was very flexible and convenient for everyone. They had a spare-sitter for the times when they both needed me or sometimes I'd look after all of their kids together but that was tough as there were 3 under 3.

    Same goes with working in preschools. You have people who take the job and then try to change it into what they want rather than fitting into the mould that the school and its dirrectors dictate or that do the bare minimum and others who really do take their work home with them and will stay after they've clocked off to talk to parents about their child.

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