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Thread: Blood Group?

  1. #1

    Question Blood Group?

    What does your blood group have to do with your bubbers? I got mine done even though I told them what it was as I'd had it done before. Is it to do with the rhesus factor thing? I'm O+ which the dr said was fantastic, my mum didn't have any problems with me though and shes O- but was told she should of had a lot of problems?

    Bit confuzzled,

    Sorry for my nievity (sp?)

    CelticMoon


  2. #2

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    I'm A- and need the anti-d injection while pg. Also once Nina was born they had to test her blood type straight away, as she is A+ I had to get another anti-d shot after having her.
    The reason for the anti-d shots is that her blood was foreign blood in my system. So next time I'm pregnant, if it's foreign blood again, then my body will attack these and I may lose the baby.

    That's a very quick and short way of putting it. Hope it makes some sense.

  3. #3

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    I was told if a positive and a negative person have a baby the baby will automatically be positive? Is your partner positive?

  4. #4
    mum5boys Guest

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    I am a bit confused about this as I am A+ but my last visit to the hospital they said there was some problem and they need to keep an eye on it, something to do with the rhesus factor thing and my antibodies.

    I have never had a problem before and wonder why it has changed.
    Michelle

  5. #5

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    Hi,

    A baby is not automatically +ve if one parent is +ve and the other is -ve.
    It doesn't really matter what the father is actually, just if the mum is RH -ve.

    I thought that it did not generally affect the first born RH +ve baby as this is when the antibodies develop, it is more of concern for subsequent pregnancies.

  6. #6

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    If you are both positive is it an automatic positive bubbers?
    Last edited by LadyRaven; February 20th, 2007 at 01:27 PM. Reason: Fixed up sentence so it actually made some sense lol

  7. #7

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    From what I found (below) I think if both parents are +, then bub will be too.

    There are different ways to classify blood. The two major forms of classification include the ABO system and the Rhesus (Rh) type system.Together, they comprise the eight main blood groups.
    A person's Rhesus type is determined by a pair of genes, each one inherited from one parent. Blood is either Rh-positive or Rh-negative, depending on whether or not certain molecules are present. A person who is Rh-negative will experience a severe immune system reaction if Rh-positive blood gets into their bloodstream. This can happen during childbirth, if an Rh-negative woman gives birth to an Rh-positive baby. If blood cells from the baby travel across the placenta, the woman's immune system will regard the Rh-positive cells as a threat. Specialised white blood cells will make antibodies designed to kill Rh-positive blood cells. If the woman subsequently conceives another Rh-positive baby, her immune system will flood her child with antibodies. These antibodies then destroy the baby's red blood cells. If left untreated, this can result in severe anaemia or even death.

  8. #8

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    From my understanding (only high school biology ) there are dominant and recessive genes involved too. I'm O+, but both my parents are A+. (Had a bit of a go at them when I found out as a teenager that I had a different blood type to them: "Why didn't you tell me I was adopted" etc etc... Confused parents replied, "But you weren't..." ) Turns out that it's possible because the O gene is recessive and mum and dad each carry an O gene which is how I ended up with that blood group. I wonder if it works the same way with the RH-ve part? That the +ve part is the dominant gene, therefore if one parent is +ve the baby will be +ve? Anyway, given that you are RH+ve you don't need to worry. Out of interest, did your mum have any subsequent kids after you?

  9. #9

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    I dont know too much about this stuff except for the lovely needles we get lol but i am B- and my DP is B+ but our daughter is actually B- like me

  10. #10

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    Ah. Well, there goes that theory, LOL.

  11. #11

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    Two Rh+ parents can have an Rh- baby. It depends what their own ancestry is.
    Everyone has two genes for the Rh factor, one from each parent. Rh+ people can have two positive genes (++) OR a positive and a negative (+-). Because the + is dominant, even if they are +-, they will always test positive.
    Rh- people ALWAYS have two --genes, because the negative is recessive.
    Here is an example.
    My dad is + and everyone in his family is +. My mum is -. So all my sibs and I are +- and our blood tests positive.
    My dh is exactly the same: his dad is + and his mum is -, so he is also +-. So, even though we are both Rh+, we each have an Rh- recessive factor. Because we EACH have it, there is a 25% chance that any of our babies would be Rh-. There is a 75% chance of an Rh+ baby (25% chance of ++, 50% chance of +-).
    For Renee84 above, her DP must be B+- (one of HIS parents or ancestors was Rh-). For them, they have 50% chance of a B- baby, and a 50% of a B+ (actually B+-) baby.

    IF THE MUM & DAD ARE BOTH NEGATIVE, THEN MUM HAS NO PROBLEMS AT ALL!! Because in that case, bub HAS to be Rh- too.

    Clear as mud eh?

  12. #12
    Princess1979 Guest

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    How confusing is all that? (for me anyway).
    I'm RH - and my DH is RH +, but my son is RH - just like me and my dad.

  13. #13

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    Here I was hoping there would be an easy formulae, but since when is anything in nature so simple lol

  14. #14
    mazzie Guest

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    I am AB-
    Will I have any problems?
    I'm not sure what my partner is.

  15. #15

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    this is quite a good fact sheet: http://www.health.act.gov.au/c/healt...152665427&sid=

    I'm Rh - and DH is positive. I had my first lot of anti D a few weeks ago. I felt a bit yuck afterwards but I don't know if it's from the needle or becuase it was really hot that day.

  16. #16

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    Thanks for the fact sheet it all sort of kinda-sort-not-really-but-almost makes sense now LOL which is an upgrade from my what-the-fudge understanding before rofl

  17. #17

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    I thought I was in the clear, but after reading this thread.. maybe not!!!
    I am O+ DP is B+ as he had a transfusion at birth, due to his mother being AB- (DP's father is B+)
    . He had all of his blood drained from his toe, and new blood pumped in through his finger!!!
    He suffered severe jaundice as well.
    His sister, had the exact same problems at DP, but their youngest sister had no problems at all which was very puzzling. They have no idea what blood type she is... possibly ABO- ???
    This whole thing is so confusing... better ask my midwife at my app tomorrow. If I find out anything relevant, I will let you all know!

  18. #18

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    I am A+. How do i find out what DD is??

    I get so confused over blood groups

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