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Thread: Deep Heat

  1. #1

    Join Date
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    Question Deep Heat

    I was just wondering if Deep Heat is ok to use while preg?
    Must have a pinched nerve or something right down low on my back, on my RHS, or just baby related pain, so wondering if its ok to use.


  2. #2

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    I was told it's a definite no. I can't remember why though :S

  3. #3

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    Yep I was told a definite no as well. isnt it an anti-inflamattory?

    I just found out recently that I can use "ice-gel"! If only I knew that earlier!

    It works like deep heat giving out a burning feeling...but its a cool icy feeling iykwim? The only ingredient is menthol so thats safe.

    HTH

  4. #4

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    Hi there!
    I have a really sore shoulder and was wondering the same thing, so I did some investigating and found this:

    Skin disorders and aching muscles


    Many creams, lotions and ointments containing chemicals and medications can be absorbed through the skin and into your blood stream (reaching your baby). It is for this reason that you need to be wary of what you use on your skin during pregnancy. Most plain moisturising creams and oils are fine, it is skin products with medicated additives that you need to avoid.

    As a general guide:


    If you are used to using 'deep heat' type of creams or ointments for muscular pains, you are better off using heat packs and massage (particularly during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy).
    Treatments for acne and skin conditions should be checked with your caregiver, especially if you are trying to conceive or are pregnant. Avoid any creams containing vitamin A.
    Do not use creams containing antibiotics unless prescribed by your caregiver. Do not use creams containing tetracycline antibiotics (these can stain the baby's teeth and cause bone malformations in the baby).
    Use steroid creams only when prescribed by your doctor and do so sparingly. These are generally only recommended for small areas of irritated skin and not for the general itchiness that many pregnant women can experience. You can read more in your skin during pregnancy.
    Try to avoid the use of anti-fungal creams during the first 3 months of pregnancy.



    So I think its a no!

    Hope this helps

    Nicky

  5. #5

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    i use it to massage my dh's back - do you reckon that would be a prob?

  6. #6

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    i wouldnt touch it either darl!

  7. #7

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    I think your DH will need to massage his own back from now on!!
    I would stay well away from it I think! Dont want it in your blood stream!!

  8. #8

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    Yeah I'd steer clear as well.

  9. #9

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    Or wear gloves

  10. #10
    LizzysMum Guest

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    How about trying some yummy massage oil with some lavender drops in it? The smell of lavender always helps me relax (and stops the nausea too).

  11. #11

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    Thanks for your input - thankfully, havent had to use deep heat much - DH fell outta roof the other day, and his back had been playing up something shocking, but, it seems to have settled down now.

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