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Thread: Vitamin K

  1. #1

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    Default Vitamin K

    My question is regarding vitamin K. I have read that dietary sources are avacadoes, beans, cabbage, brocolli, cauliflower, spinach. So if your dietary intake of vitamin K is adequate does this help to prevent bleeding for both mother and baby after the birth and if it does then is it necessary to give baby the vitamin K injection after the birth? I have also read that vitamin K is manufactured in the gut.


  2. #2

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    ohhh i want to know about this too... i am sure it would help for the mother but i heard babies can't produce vitk is that right??? i also heard many ppl say that u only need the vitk injection if the baby has a difficult birth like ventouse or forceps coz that can cause bruising??? i also know that there is an oral dose if u don't like the injection idea.. dunno if this helps u at all hope someone will have some better advice for both of us

  3. #3

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    i was advised that babies arent able to produce enough vitamin k regardless of mums diet, which is why they need to get the injection/oral dose of it.

  4. #4

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    Yes babies cant produce enuf once they are out, so injection or oral dose boosts their levels.....regardless id have it for my kids.... makes me feel safer...and i hate inflicting pain bit if its for their own good id do it

  5. #5

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    Vitamin K is used by the body to help blood clot. Some baby’s have a low level of vitamin K at birth. So vitamin K is given by injection or orally after birth to prevent bleeding. There is a lot of debate at the moment as to the need to give all baby’s the vitamin K. Some people suggest its like you taking panadol just in case you get a headache

  6. #6

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    Thanks Alan, Is there anyway of predicting which babies will have low levels of vitamin K. Im not against injections if they are necessary .have decided if baby is premie or low birth weight or has traumatic birth then they are at a higher risk and so will elect to give vitamin K. But still undecided if all goes well and baby is good birth weight. Alan when did routine vitamin K begin in Australia. Is anyone doing research on this topic ?
    Decisions decisions !!!!!

  7. #7

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    hehe, I had this discussion with my OB and there are only 2 points that he is adament on - Vit K is one of them (breech vag birth being the other). His theory is that all births are traumatic for the bub!

  8. #8

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    I wasn't sure about if I was going to have this done right up until even in the birthing suite...until he needed vacuum assist then I decided due to circumstances to get it in case he bled from his bruising and couldn't clot. So, basically I made the decision when I needed to.

  9. #9

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    Found some answers that helped me make decision.
    1 Dietary sources of vitamin K play a very minor role in how we obtain it, passing from mother to baby at 3 % of what is eaten , and do not protect against Vitamin K deficiency bleeding. Vit K produced by a women's gut and cannot be transmitted to her baby.
    2. Vitamin K suppliments (usually 10 mg per day for the last 3-4 weeks of pregnancy )
    can help prevent early VKDB (within 24hrs of birth) but does not protect against classical and late VKDB.
    3. Breast milk contains 1-2 micrograms per litre of vit K ( formula contains 30 mcg / L )There is no research to demonstrate how effective this is for preventing VKDB.
    4. The way your baby is born and their general appearance does not predict whether they will get VKDB Page 412-413
    Source- Birth- Conceiving, nurturing and giving birth to your baby
    Published 2004
    Publishers Mac millilan
    Authors- Catherine Price & Sandra Robinson
    Available from K Mart
    Last edited by smiley10P; April 30th, 2007 at 01:04 PM.

  10. #10

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    Smiley10P
    There is no way that I know of to predict the level of vit K in the baby.
    Not sure how long it has been use in Aust for (I’m from UK) But it has been used for a few years.
    I have not seen any research on the subject but I have not really looked for any.

  11. #11

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    i was asked on Thursday about Vit K for my bub when i had my pre admission interview at the hospital.
    Midwife said the bit about some babies blood is very thin, therefore not clotting. But, doesnt happen to all babies, so, sorta like what Alan said, like having a panadol in case you get a headache.
    I signed the consent anyway, i figured, it cant hurt to be prepared.

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