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thread: Breast feeding or Formula!

  1. #1
    Registered User

    Nov 2008
    U.S.A
    1,459

    Talking Breast feeding or Formula!

    So I thought it might be nice to take a little poll on here. Who is planning on breast feeding, and who is using formula. I have nothing against either, i just like to here peoples opinions on this matter.



    P.S. I am breast feeding
    WHY: I am a first time mother, and I have always wanted to try this. Besides the fact that it is great for the baby, i heard it has a great bonding experience.

    Anyone Ever breast fed after a cesarean? Curious how that works too.

  2. #2
    Registered User

    Feb 2009
    2,031

    I am very much hoping to establish bfing with my baby. I have tried every time and it never worked out well because of the HG. Proper nutition and hydration in the mother is vital - and I had nothing left by the time I delivered my babies.

    Why?: Its what I am suposed to do! I carry my baby for 9 months, and then I feed my baby for at least a year as thats my bodies job! We are lucky today to have formula when we can't!

  3. #3
    BellyBelly Life Subscriber

    Jun 2005
    Blue Mountains
    5,086

    Breastfeeding, because of all the benefits for both mum & bub, for the convenience, and coz... well.. that's how we feed our babies. If my body can grow the baby, it can feed the baby.

    Jessica, with wanting to breastfeed, I'd encourage you to find out everything you can about it in advance. Be prepared for all the ridiculous comments you may get, such as you're starving your baby at 2 days old coz your milk isn't in yet, or your milk mustn't be good enough if he's still waking at night.. etc etc etc.. so you can ignore them! Surround yourself with successful breastfeeders who can help you through the rough patches. It isn't always easy to breastfeed, but the hurdles can be got over with the right support. Best piece of advice I got, was only take breastfeeding advice from successful breastfeeders... and this includes midwives & lactation consultants!

    I notice you're in Oregon.. I think it's Nursing Mothers Association or something over there? It'd be worth getting in touch with them while you're still pregnant. They would have the best support & advice for feeding after a c/s too.

    All the best... and enjoy it!

  4. #4
    Registered User

    Oct 2008
    269

    Breastfeeding, for all the reasons said above. I know some of the hurdles and pain that some women go through but I have been told If you are strong and determined to make it work then it will all be ok in the end.

    I will be attending breastfeeding classes at 36 weeks at my Hospital.

  5. #5
    Registered User

    Nov 2008
    U.S.A
    1,459

    Talking

    Inertia- About the hydrating thing. Are you talking about during pregnancy? Is it best to keep yourself very hydrated and nutritioned. Does it help with breast-feeding?

    Liz- I am very interested in this, and I think I might just take your advice on calling them. I love getting all the advice I can. I have read up a little bit so far, and I did read that sometimes it can take up to two days for your milk to come in. Its does sound bad, but is it true that newborns actually are not that hungry the first couple days anyways.

    Anyways I hope I can get all this down!!
    Thanks girls

  6. #6
    Registered User

    Nov 2006
    111

    Intially breastfeeding but I know I will end up formula feeding when i return to work full time (about 7mths) and probably earlier if I have another lactose intolerant baby. So I am hoping for at least a combo of both.

    I was so relieved about the change in dd after we went to formula as the stuff i was giving her during breasfeeding wasn't doing a good enough job. In hindsight I would have liked to breastfeed longer than the 5mths I did.

  7. #7
    Registered User

    Feb 2009
    2,031

    Indeed Jessica. I mean you body can make it no matter what crap you eat - but it needs hydration, and my problem wasnt what I was eating. I simply couldn't keep anything down. Physically I was a wreck, but me and my body did the absolute best they could. It just wasn't to be because of the hyperemesis.

    But when breastfeeding - drinking something like 6 cups of water a day is very important.

  8. #8
    Registered User

    Feb 2008
    Down Under
    1,617

    I have done both with my kids.
    Logan i BF until about 2 months...
    Bella i BF for only 6 weeks and changed to formula but now i am re-lactating so i can BF again as i actually miss it.

  9. #9
    Life Subscriber

    Jul 2006
    Brisbane
    6,683

    I second the suggestion to contact La Leche League. The right information and support makes all the difference with breastfeeding, especially in our society where we don't have lots of breastfeeding mums around us to help us.

    And there are many, many reasons to breastfeed. I can't list them all here (there are too many), but here are a few to give you some food for thought. For the baby it provides them with better immunity - they are far less likely to have ear or upper respiratory tract infections just for starters, fewer illnesses, doctors visits and hospital stays, a significantly lower risk of allergies, ideal brain development, jaw, speech and eyesight development, no constipation of very low risk of gastro. And for the future, it reduces the risk of juvenile diabetes, heart disease and obesity. And for you, breastfeeding gives you a lower risk of breast and ovarian cancers, heart disease, stroke and osteoporosis. Not to mention cost and convenience. So I would say that speaks for itself!

    I wish you all the very best with it hun. Sometimes you can experience problems in the beginning, but nearly every problem can be overcome with the right information and support. GL.

  10. #10
    Registered User

    Apr 2008
    Melbourne
    6,745

    I am breastfeeding and have breastfed both my DD's - I have also had 2 c/sections and have had no trouble establishing breastfeeding.

    I enjoy the bond, the closeness and also the convenience of BF - instant food on tap wherever and whenever bubs needs it

  11. #11
    Registered User

    Dec 2007
    WA
    288

    Hope to be able to BF

  12. #12
    Registered User

    Oct 2007
    1,282

    Jessica - BF here. I had my little man at 35 weeks by caesar and we had no problems breastfeeding at all due to caesar or early delivery. Good luck with everything!! !! !! ABA are great support if you need them.

  13. #13
    Registered User

    Jul 2007
    Melbourne
    3,660

    Before I had my baby I had no idea about the benefits of breastfeeding, and although I ended up BFing I was going to FF. Now I would say there is no choice. Breastfeeding all the way.

  14. #14
    Registered User

    Jan 2008
    in my head
    1,975

    I am bf'ing and I had a c-section with a few complications for me afterwards. If you are planning a c-section (or even if you have an unplanned one like I did), make sure you can get bub to your boob asap after the birth. It will really help. It can take 3-5 days for your milk to come in but just keep putting bub to the breast as often as you can in those early days. Don't listen to the nurses when they try to take bub because "you've got nothing for him/her" just keep letting bub suck!

    I have had a few issues with feeding but hopefully, 6 weeks down the track, we're coming out the other side. It's been the most difficult but incredible journey (for me) but also really rewarding. I think if you're mentally prepared for it to be difficult and you're really determined to make it work, then you'll be successful. (And it might not be that hard for you but at least if you're prepared for the worst you'll cope if it gets tough IYKWIM?). Also, have lots of people around you who are supportive, even if they don't know too much. You need the people you live with and have lots of contact with in the early months to support your decision (which is true no matter how you choose to feed your baby).

    Get all the information you can now from qualified people and then, once bub is here, just keep asking away. You'll be an expert in no time!

  15. #15
    Registered User

    Nov 2008
    Melbourne
    2,008

    I'm also planning on breastfeeding...

    On another note though, I was wondering how many of you ladies have started lactating (sorry personal question I know)... I know it doesn't always happen in pregnancy, but was wondering if others are cos I haven't had a thing...

  16. #16
    Registered User

    Oct 2008
    269

    If I squeeze my nipples I can see some stuff come out but other than that I don't actually lactate on my own.

  17. #17
    BellyBelly Life Subscriber

    Jun 2005
    Blue Mountains
    5,086

    I have read up a little bit so far, and I did read that sometimes it can take up to two days for your milk to come in. Its does sound bad, but is it true that newborns actually are not that hungry the first couple days anyways.
    It can sometimes take up to 5 days for it come in. Newborns are born with fat-stores that they live off whilst drinking colostrum, and colostrum is so rich, they don't need that much of it in any one feed anyway.

    As others have said, just keep putting bub to the boob. The baby sucking, and even the baby crying helps bring your milk in. The last thing you want to do when the nurses hound you about your 'hungry' baby in those first few days is give any top-ups, this takes the baby away from the breast, and your breasts need all the stimulation they can get to kick into gear.

  18. #18
    Life Subscriber

    Jul 2006
    Brisbane
    6,683

    Babies tummies can only hold about 5ml (not sure what that is in ounces, but we are talking a very small amount which can be given with a little syringe) anyway, so they definitely don't need milk in the first days. As Liz says, the colostrum is very high in both nutrients and antibodies - it contains everything your baby needs until your milk comes in.

    C-sects can cause complications - sometimes it can delay your milk coming in. Also the drugs can make baby sleepy, and often you are separated from baby for a while, both of which can impact on the baby attaching well at first. If you have a c/s, if it is possible, try to have baby with you in recovery. Feeding within the first hour is ideal for establishing bfing. If you are planning a c/s or expecting to have to have one, joining La Leche League will be even more beneficial for you, so they can give you the information and support you need to overcome any issues. GL.

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