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Thread: Bee Sting Allergies

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Default Bee Sting Allergies

    Hi!



    Just wondering if any of you know about bee sting allergies? My 7yo niece was bitten a week ago and immediately it swelled up and she had a rash over her and then had trouble breathing.
    My sister gave her an antihistamine tablet and she seemed to feel better.

    I've told her to take her to the dr because I thought that bee sting allergies could get worse with each bite.

    Would love to hear you opinions...Thanks!

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Default

    I dont know much about it but I think she should take her to a doctor and ask for an epi pen just in case it happens again and the reaction is worse.

  3. #3

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    Sep 2006
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    Default

    Hi there. Not sure but id take her to the doc's just to make sure. Better to be safe then sorry.

    Good luck

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    cowtown
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    I'd go to the GP if it was me. I had a lot of bee stings as a kid (not all at once) and never had any sort of reaction other than localised pain, so if it were Milo who'd reacted like that I'd have been at the GP or hospital that day.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Geelong, VIC
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    Default

    This is something I found that might help.

    Allergies to insect stings
    There are many stinging insects found in Australia, and a surprising number of Australians are allergic to their stings. The most common allergic reactions occur with stings from bees, wasps and ants. The degree of allergy varies widely, however, most people are not considered ‘allergic’ to insect bites, experiencing only mild symptoms such as local itching and minor swelling.

    Other people, though, may have severe allergic reactions when stung, and a number of deaths are recorded every year. Most stings tend to occur in summer.

    The majority of insect stings only cause discomfort and result in local pain, itching, some swelling and redness at the site of the sting, and this is not considered an allergic reaction. Local treatment is generally all that is needed to treat this type of sting. In these cases, the area should be washed and disinfected and ice applied to relieve the swelling and general discomfort.

    In cases where the swelling continues to expand, antihistamine or possibly steroid treatment may be needed. On rare occasions, the sting site may become infected and antibiotics may be required to treat the infection.

    What is an allergic reaction?
    The most serious reaction to stings is classed as an allergic reaction and the severity varies from person to person. The most serious of the allergic reactions is called anaphylaxis and can be fatal in many instances.

    Signs of allergic reaction include:

    rash and intense itching in areas other than the sting site;
    puffy eyelids;
    wheezing and difficulty in breathing;
    difficulty in swallowing due to swelling of the tongue, and hoarseness; and
    dizziness and fainting — this is a very serious reaction.

    Severe allergic reactions generally occur within minutes of the sting, but may occur up to 24 hours after the sting. In cases of severe allergic reaction, prompt medical treatment is necessary.

    Treatment of insect allergies
    If stung by a bee or a wasp, do not pull or squeeze the sting that is left in the skin as this can cause more venom to be released. The sting should be removed by scraping it sideways with a fingernail, blunt knife or similar object.

    Allergic reactions need to be treated with adrenaline. There are now self-injectable devices available for people with known reactions. These devices are already filled with adrenaline and should be injected into the muscle at the front of the thigh. These types of device hold only one dose, and people should be taken to hospital after the adrenaline shot — in case they need further doses and for specialist observation
    Raven

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