Page 2 of 17 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast
Results 19 to 36 of 298

Thread: Nursing/Midwifery students (or wannabes LOL)....

  1. #19

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, Australia
    Posts
    8,980

    Default

    Tegan,

    Good on you for doing a Doula course first! I think it's the best way to do it, to go in with a view of normal birth - lots of people who I know who did Rhea's course in previous years have gone on to do midwifery have been disappointed that it goes into medical birth right away and that is the focus - I think all midwifery and medical (obstetric / doctor) degrees should begin with the same normal birth course - they should do the course we do!

    I did lots of research before choosing to do Rhea's course, she is very well regarded in the industry and is lucky enough to rub shoulders with the like of Sheila Kitzinger and Janet Balaskas, so we were all very jealous. I hope one day I will get to meet them too!

    I looked at online options which are great for those in more remote places or if you are unable to get to classes, some of the Doulas I asked about the whole thing found the online aspect great for them, others found it harder to be more disciplined and not get distracted. Personally I loved having a class to go to, as I made a whole heap of friends with the same passion and interest I had, I had instant back-ups to work with, I had access to lots of pregnant women when attending Rhea's pain workshop classes which is a course requirement (I had two couples ask me to attend their birth in one class!) and you have access to all Rhea's books and resources which saved me stacks of money having to buy books. Plus I loved my child-free days and no distraction during the learning



    There aren't a huge amount of courses and options at the moment, I am sure more will immerge as it gets busier / bigger and there will be more options available. At the end of the day, we all have what it takes to become a Doula or Birth Attendant, it's just tapping into that and getting out there and exposed to birth. My first birth was so much different to what I do now, although the first mum I supported did a brilliant job of letting herself take over and do her thing, so I didn't feel that there was a huge amount I could do - just reassure, be there and get her drinks and all the practical things. *aaah the memories*. It also is a good stepping stone to mid, this year three out of three of Rhea's students got accepted into mid, but I am not sure this is what I want to do. At first I wanted to, but now, being there and seeing it all, I would much rather be with a mother from start to finish one on one, not get involved with the medical aspects, not have to deal with policies and paperwork etc. I love what I do because I love talking to a mother after her birth and hearing that she had a fantastic experience - might not have gone the way she hoped - but she felt held, supported and that she had the best outcome possible.
    Last edited by BellyBelly; June 27th, 2006 at 11:21 AM.
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children
    Author of Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know
    Follow me in 2015 as I go Around The World + Kids!
    Forever grateful to my incredible Mod Team and many wonderful members who have been so supportive since 2003.

  2. #20

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Sydney's Norwest
    Posts
    4,954

    Default

    Kelly, Rhea's course is great if you live in Victoria, but I don't. I emailed the one in Sydney (can't think of the name now) and they never responded to me. Is there any that you recommend up here.
    Last edited by Trish; June 27th, 2006 at 11:53 AM.

  3. #21

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, Australia
    Posts
    8,980

    Default

    Sorry I was just replying generally!

    I have some resources here. NSW there are a couple of places, one Life Options run by Denise Love (I think she is now a doctor - Dr Love hehe!) but she is one of the long term Doula women in Australia who used to do something like 3 births a week!). She doesn't do birth support now but trains Doulas and other things. She also started up the other Doula training place in NSW, Birth Central. The links are all in the article.

    Do you mean is Jan Robinson still practicing?
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children
    Author of Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know
    Follow me in 2015 as I go Around The World + Kids!
    Forever grateful to my incredible Mod Team and many wonderful members who have been so supportive since 2003.

  4. #22

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Sydney's Norwest
    Posts
    4,954

    Default

    Sorry Kel, didn't mean for it to sound rude. Umm Jan Robinson is a midwife not a doula, I realised this after I posted which is why I removed it

    Birth Central was the place I emailed but got no response from

    LOL @ Dr Love. I will have a look at the links, Thank you for them.

  5. #23

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, Australia
    Posts
    8,980

    Default

    Yep I know Jan, lots of women I know have her there As far as I know she is still active but who knows - the birth world changes so quick! Denise Love used to run Birth Central and I don't know when you emailed but there was a while where the online side of it was very disorganised - perhaps call? I can't recommend Denise enough - women love her and she's very mother figure like...
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children
    Author of Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know
    Follow me in 2015 as I go Around The World + Kids!
    Forever grateful to my incredible Mod Team and many wonderful members who have been so supportive since 2003.

  6. #24

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    towards Mornington/Frankston
    Posts
    87

    Default

    When I was living in Sydney, I tried to get in touch with Denise Love, but her business is now run by another woman (who's name I forget, and who was going to be my doula w/ my daughter but then said she'd be out of town)....I think many are missing Denise Love being on the scene...I believe she is still working as a doula...but perhaps is just not into the business side of things any more....anyway, I couldn't find her anywhere.

    Trish...I'm just about completed...the first half of the course is all about pregnancy/birth, etc, and then I'm onto the 'starting up your business/legalieties', etc stuff. It's wonderful...as bellybelly said, it depends on the person, as some people don't like distance due to having limited motivation, but I'm so passionate about the course that it's just FUN! I truly love it, and it's structured in a very concise, intelligent way. With each module, you recieve books, lectures, an exam, and a C.D rom or two with various lectures, demonstrations, and presentations - all by Dr. Vose. So, if you think you'd thrive by distance, I can't recommend it enough. Also, it comes at a fairly good price for what you get - $220 per module, which you can pay as you go. (and the course includes about six-eight books to add to your "doula library". I have added to my doula library over time, mainly buying fantastic books from Capers Bookstore, online. Capers is full of great things for doulas, childbirth educators and midwives (as well as parents and parents-to-be), and I'm going to be getting a model pelvis and baby and such in time (these things all cost a great deal). As well as that, I just keep my eye open for good quality books and pregnancy yoga DVD's, etc when they're on sale, to add to by lending doula library. But yes, it does cost a bit, and I'm having to do it gradually. I've also gone through just about every book on any pregnancy/birth related subject in a couple of libraries and photo-copied relevant articles as a resource for parents....so there are a whole heap of options. Online articles are good too....just make sure you reference everything!

    I haven't done my births yet for a few reasons....recently moved and been busy with the house; only started my course when my daughter was a new-born (and now 8 months) so I've been busy with her....but I'm now getting a bit of a nudge by Dr. Vose, telling me to "go go go" as I'm well and truly ready....I can't wait! So, I've just started to advertise my services on this site...and will be leaving a calling card all around town within a couple of weeks. I've attended a birth (other than my own two) in the past, as I've always wanted to be a midwife, so I'm just looking forward to it all.

    Feel free to ask any questions, Trish...I'm happy to answer them!

  7. #25

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, Australia
    Posts
    8,980

    Default

    I chat with Denise all the time via email, she runs Life Options, Doula course is in Waterloo, they also do HypnoDoulas. Capers is VERY expensive, get it stacks cheaper from Seek Books and eBay. One book was $20 cheaper on Seek.
    Last edited by BellyBelly; June 27th, 2006 at 02:57 PM.
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children
    Author of Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know
    Follow me in 2015 as I go Around The World + Kids!
    Forever grateful to my incredible Mod Team and many wonderful members who have been so supportive since 2003.

  8. #26

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Sydney's Norwest
    Posts
    4,954

    Default

    Thanks for the info girls. Kelly I had Jan there when Tehya was born. She was only as a support/backup midwife and I found her to be a very calming person. There were a few times I didn't agree with her but that was soon sorted out

    I will have a look a both Life Options and Birth Central again. I do like the idea of Optimum Birth too as I like the idea of being able to pay as I go.

  9. #27

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, Australia
    Posts
    8,980

    Default

    Most of them do have a payment plan - so it's best to call around and chat. You usually pay a deposit and then pay in installments, I think they all do that? All up my course was $2000 which I paid throughout the year. It's so worth it though, for me it wasn't just learning about birth but myself too, it was an amazing journey. I've found more nurturing in myself that I never thought I had and it makes a difference with how I interact with family too - especially when there is pain involved ROFL! e.g. my daughter got badly scratched by the cat the other night and was howling in pain, and all the birth stuff came flooding in on coping with pain - I am long gone!!!
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children
    Author of Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know
    Follow me in 2015 as I go Around The World + Kids!
    Forever grateful to my incredible Mod Team and many wonderful members who have been so supportive since 2003.

  10. #28

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    towards Mornington/Frankston
    Posts
    87

    Default

    Kelly, I just checked out the info on Denise Love...yes, she's obviously around now! lol. I believe during the time I was finding a doula for my daughters birth, she was selling a large portion of her business to Renee Adair (the one who was going to be my doula), but Denise seems to be running more of the show now. Good!

    Yeah, Capers is very expensive, but I do like it...I love recieving my catelogue...and I've got that 10% discount thing going, so it has its perks. I hadn't heard of Seek books, shall check it out, thanks. Have given up on ebay, as every time I've looked in their book section, they've only had very general pregnancy/birth books (the good ones probably go very quickly and I don't get in fast enough).

    Trish...no prob. Yes, it's great to pay as you go..and there is no deposit, I just payed on-line and recieved all my stuff for the first module within days So, all up, the course is $880, or a one-off of $800 if you choose to pay that way. It's great, as I've worked at my own pace, which has allowed me to study even w/ a new baby...and during our move, I had a two-month break to concentrate on everything else, which was great. Also, there are tutors available by phone and on-line (in fact, the founder of the Melbourne Doula Network (which is very new) is a tutor for Optimum Birth, so it's a well-known and respected course (I don't trust courses until I look into them, of course...and after asking a million questions, and talking w/ Dr. Vose, it all sounded great). Dr. Vose is a brilliant woman, who is more than happy to have in-depth discussions about anything you bring up...and I love to write, so email is ideal for me. So, yeah....give her an email (and tell her I sent you.lol), and if you choose to go w/ Optimum Birth, as I said, you'd be starting immediatly, which is very exciting!!

  11. #29

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    5,756

    Default

    Trish - I emailed Birth Central and got a reply, so maybe the email never made it? I have the info pack, if you want me to email it to you?

    I wish there was a course in Newcastle, because i'd love to go to a class to do it.

    when it comes time to go to the births that you need to before completing the course, where do you find the pregnant women? The only place i know is bellybelly, lol. But is there any other place i can find them?

  12. #30
    Lisa76 Guest

    Default

    WOW.... all this stuff is great.

    Tegan...I would love a copy of the brochure as well if you wouldn't mind. You could email me at nixon_6@bigpond.net.au

    Liana....What does starting your own doula business involve. I had honestly never heard of a doula until i joined bellybelly so I am wondering if there are any in SA. If there are they must all be hiding as I have had 4 babies I would have thought if there were any around that I would have heard of them. What does a doula actually do and area there any insurance nightmares, If a person hires a doula do they still have a midwife and have baby in hospital, does a doula work with the hospital, are they employed by the hospital???? Ohhh now im all confused :eek:

  13. #31

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Sydney's Norwest
    Posts
    4,954

    Default

    Tegan, Iwould a copy of that if you don't mind. Thanks heaps for that hun

    Liana, that sounds fantastic. I like the idea of being able to study at home and fingers crossed I would be able to find ample time for it. My only worry is that after doing it, is there enough work out there. I mean are Doula's really used that much in the general community. I don't want to spend the time and of course the money if there is no work available to me. Maybe thats just my partner talking. I have spoken to him abbout it and he doesn't think there is a real need for Doula's out there. But then again he didn't see the need for a private midwife or a homebirth when we could have one in hospital for nothing.. Men!! LOL.

  14. #32
    Lisa76 Guest

    Default

    Trish....I have the same worry, would there be any work out there for doulas. I just looked up the doulas in SA and there is only ONE!!! i have just emailed her to ask about her experience of being a doula. Being a doula sounds fantastic but one income and 4 children just isn't working for us so I need to be in a paying job.

    Kelly....I hear what your saying about kid free days. I have 3 days a week at Uni and I love the contact with other people in the same position as me and being kid free for a while. I love my kids but every parent needs a bit of time out.
    Are there any particular doula courses that you recommend? I have looked up birthcentral but its not good as I live in SA and I looked up otimumbirth and their course sounds perfect for me. Are any of the courses better than others or any to avoid?

    Lea....If you are going to apply to sit the STAT test I have a couple of the sample question books. You could borrow them and have a look through if you like. It will help you to prepare.

    Mother Goose....did you have to do a journal entry on Religion for Society and Culture? I am well and truly stuck. The question i have to answer is " What are the major sociological perspectives concerning religion as a social insitution?" WTF??? I can't find anything on sociological perspectives let alone the major ones, not even on wikipedia and EVERYTHING is in wikipedia????
    Last edited by Lisa76; June 28th, 2006 at 03:12 PM.

  15. #33

    Default

    Hi Lisa, nope didn't have to do it. But break the Q down.

    Sociological perspectives
    Religion as a Social institution

    How does society perceive relgion? - sociological persperctives
    What ARE sociological perspectives?
    How is religion considered a social institution? - Religion as a Social institution
    How does religion impact on society?
    How do people intergrate religious society and "general" society?
    Focus on things like homosexuality, contraception, marriage, sexual relations, abortion (all things relgion usually has a different opinion about than wider society)
    Talk about the reaction of society to things like homosexuality (for example) compared to the reaction of the church.

    I found the text books useless in this subject. Use the Uni database instead. Did a quick search using "social Perspectives" and "Religion" on academic search elite and these were some of the results. Included are some books you might be able to borrow at the library if you are able to get there. Also try your local library for stuff, I found they normally have a bit.

    Page 35 of "Society and Culture: A sociological introduction to contemporary Australia 2nd Ed" has stuff on the theoretical perspectives which will help - I assume this is still the standard text? Can't believe I still have it!Chapter 20 of Sociology Australian Connections 2nd Ed (Jureidini and Poole) also covers religion in society.

    Race, Religion, and Caste: Anthropological and Sociological Perspectives.
    Source: Comparative Sociology (1569-1322); Volume: 1; Issue: 2; Date: 2002

    CATHOLICS IN ENGLAND 1950-2000: HISTORICAL AND SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES (Book). By: O'Leary, Richard. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Mar2001, Vol. 40 Issue 1, p138-139, 2p; (AN 14266507)

    Religion in Australia: Sociological Perspectives (Book). By: Bouma, Gary D.; Bouma, Donald H.. Review of Religious Research, Sep93, Vol. 35 Issue 1, p86-87, 2p; (AN 11062113)

    Religious Change and Continuity: Sociological Perspectives (Book). By: Roof, Wade Clark. Social Forces, Dec80, Vol. 59 Issue 2, p552-553, 2p; (AN 5281398)
    PDF Full Text (124K)

    Good luck! When's it due?

  16. #34

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, Australia
    Posts
    8,980

    Default

    Not only are Seek Books cheaper, it is also an affiliate of BellyBelly, so if you make purchases via the link in the directory, we get a small percent of sales, but the main thing is they are cheap and have a massive range.

    Renee did buy it from Denise I think.

    If anyone is looking for a Doula, you can check out our Doula Locator - check the link at the top of these forums, or you can email me if you can't find anyone and I will get names through word of mouth.

    There's never been a better time to become a Doula when the system is not great, plus lots of publicity is starting to prop up. Coles Baby interviewed me for their spring edition which is a 500 word story. Coles Baby is the most widely distributed parenting mag I think they said. Also I am doing an article of similar length for the Nappy Bag Book - so lots of publicity to come. I am working really hard to promote Birth Support in the industry... it WILL grow.

    As one midwife confided in me, she felt that, 'the way things are going, if you want support during labour in hospitals, you'll have to pay for your own...' I also spoke to an influential person in the birth & MCH industry this week who also said even birth centres are turning into simply low-risk maternity units - she is seeing lots of changes with birth centres too.

    We need to infiltrate the system full of people passionate to make change. Power in numbers.
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children
    Author of Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know
    Follow me in 2015 as I go Around The World + Kids!
    Forever grateful to my incredible Mod Team and many wonderful members who have been so supportive since 2003.

  17. #35

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    towards Mornington/Frankston
    Posts
    87

    Default

    Lisa76 - starting your own doula business means registering a business name (in most cases, probably.lol), and getting the word out there, by advertising in magazines, on the net, in bith centres/hospitals/family health clinics/libraries/wherever, really! You have to have all business stuff set up for tax purposes, etc, of course, and you must abide by the regulations of being a doula (I'm a bit scattered...just found out my sister is expecting her first child, and I'm all excited!! You find your own clients, and arrange for them to interview you, and then arrange pre-natal catch-ups, where you help them organise a birth plan and get to know them, as well as offer any informational support they may want (such as if they want a water birth, you could loan them books/D.V.D's on that). (ah, all jittery with excitement!!) where was I?..... A doula does not perform anything medical (it is completely against the law, as a doula has no medical training....also, even if she is otherwise trained asa midwife or other health-care-professional, she is only allowed to act as a doula if hired as such). So, yes, a doula is an extra support person, there to help the mother in any physical/emotional and informational way, without doing anything medical, and without offering personal opinion. It doesn't matter what the doulas beliefs are, she is there to help you achieve the birth YOU want, and to offe nothing but kind-hearted support. A doula is also there to help any other support people through the birth. Husbands/sisters/mothers/friend may fear the fact that their loved-one is in pain, and sway them into intervention they may not really want or need. A doula, understanding the reasons behind the pain of childbirth, and having whitnessed/and understanding the normal physiology of labour can help keep the room a calm, peaceful and happy place...and therefore aid the natural progression of labour, as the mother has that space to just "go within" and "go with the flow", and endorphins can do their thing, etc. Doulas are not employed by the hospitals, they are currently hired privetly by the individual. Any other questions, don't hesitate to ask! Oh, and insurance is not a worry, as doulas do not perform any medical task - they are purely there to assist the mother in natural ways, and as long as they don't cross the boundaries of their roll, all is good. To date, no doula has been taken to court.


    Trish - lol! Is there a need - Yes! Just as much need as there is for independent midwives and home births....if we want to cut the terrible intervention rate (the casarean rate is 50% in some hospitals!!), women need access to people like doulas, who drop intervention rates dramatically....I could get the numbers for you, if you like...don't have them at hand. Having recently birthed in Sydney, I found doulas to be VERY popular there, but far less known of here in Melbourne (where the word is really beginning to get out there, though). As far as work goes, one must be extremely passionate about the work of the doula to become one, as one can't make a bucket-load from it, and most women just have 1-2 clients a month at most (or less if they are busy with a young family themselves). Due to the nature of the job, there is always the risk of women going into labour at the same time, or women needing you at their three-day birth journey (which, no doubt would leave anyone feeling drained). If you have the passion though, becoming a doula and having the honor to assist a woman during this time, must be one of the most rewarding roles there is!
    Last edited by Lil_Pearl; June 28th, 2006 at 03:48 PM.

  18. #36

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, Australia
    Posts
    8,980

    Default

    Here's some more info and Doula stories: Answering an Ancient Call: Supporting Women in Labour.
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children
    Author of Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know
    Follow me in 2015 as I go Around The World + Kids!
    Forever grateful to my incredible Mod Team and many wonderful members who have been so supportive since 2003.

Page 2 of 17 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •