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Thread: Unusual development in toddler, cause for concern?

  1. #1

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    Default Unusual development in toddler, cause for concern?

    A close friend has a 22 month old child, he does not say any words. He does not interact with other children. She left him with me for a few minutes the other day, he just sat looking blankly pointing in the direction she left. I tried to hold him close but he was not responsive, just stared blankly. I understand they all develop differently etc etc but this last point really struck me as very unusual, I sensed he didn't want his mother to leave but no tears, no facial expression, no clinging, nothing.




    Any thoughts?

  2. #2

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    I would say that is unusual. I am thinking he sounds potentially autistic. Perhaps someone more experienced than I am will comment. Has the mum said anything?

  3. #3

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    My daughter is on the spectrum, at 22 months old she barely spoke a word but she did the opposite to that she screamed, day in day out, banged her head amongst other things

  4. #4

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    A while ago now (maybe six months to a year) she made a throw away comment about him being possibly autistic. She realises he's not the "norm" but now puts it down to just a general delay in reaching milestones. She is somewhat concerned about his language development but her partner is against any form of intervention.

    Everyone I know who has met him has commented on how unusual he is, and quite a few have suggested autism.

    I don't know enough about autism to comment.

  5. #5

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    It is possibly autism, but I was actually thinking he might have a hearing problem? That would account for a lack of words/verbal communication. Either way, I think despite her DH's wishes to not intervene, this sounds like there really does need to be intervention because the longer it goes on, the more intensive any therapy/treatment will need to be which will be harder on the little one in the long run. I think she needs to speak to him about why he doesn't want anything done, is it fear of his son being labelled as something? or does he genuinely think there isn't a problem?

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trillian View Post
    I think she needs to speak to him about why he doesn't want anything done, is it fear of his son being labelled as something? or does he genuinely think there isn't a problem?
    He believes his son will catch up in time. I tried raising the subject of his speech delay gently but it obviously didn't go anywhere. Really hard to know what to say, or should I just butt out....

  7. #7

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    TBH, I would "butt out" for now. If she raises it with you again - jump on the opportunity.

    GL!

  8. #8

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    I'm guessing that she really wants to see if there is an issue, but is being hamstrung by her DH, so maybe just butt out, but let her know that you will be there for her if she wants to talk about it because it may be hard for her to talk about it properly with her DH.

  9. #9

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    I agree possibly autisim, a friend of mine have 2 diagnosed, at differnet dgrees of the spectrum. It's your friend so it's up to you if you think she will talk to you about it. I would be surprised if her mchn or gp havent made coment or organised a referal for an assessment.
    don't forget, she might be in denial because she feels like she's failed her child in some way, be sensitive to her feelings.

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