Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 37 to 54 of 86

Thread: DIY Deliveries: More Women Go It Alone (US)

  1. #37

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    In Bankworld with Barbara
    Posts
    14,235

    Default

    You have completely misunderstood what I was getting at. I am not advocating hospital births because I mentioned that things can go wrong - things can and do go wrong in many different birthing settings - I was asking what are *you*, as the mother who has chosen to do it this way going to do to make sure you can get yourself and your baby out if it if it happens. have you organised oxygen in case your baby needs it? Do you have clamps for the cord? Why didn't you save up to be able to afford a homebirth midwife if you knew that's what you wanted to do? There is no point just going and doing it without learning basic processes to help you birth your baby - would you, your husband and your Doula even have the first clue what to do to safely birth a breech baby, a baby with the cord around it's neck or even if you had a retained placenta - these things commonly happen - please dont be so naive to think that they can't. You can have a great birth in spite of your previous experiences without being spiteful. I am all for women choosing the way they want to give birth, just make sure that you are prepared for it. Its like saying that tomorrow you are going to go and perform brain surgery - now that's all well and good, but do you know how to perform brain surgery?

    Don't be sorry for my experience - I'm not, he was a posterior birth and while yes it was hard and I didn't get to delay the cord clamping because it was around his neck I don't reget it for a minute or think that it was a 'bad' birth - I worked damn hard to bring him into this world and I am thankfull that I had staff who knew how to try to get him to turn and to remove the cord from his neck and to dislodge his stuck shoulders. I have had one birth that did go a bit pear shaped - my 3rd was an induced birth and I had a retained placenta and a PPH but I don't regret that either because if I wasn't where I was I would have died, simple as that. And it was her birth that made me find the answers I needed to make my final birth what it was.


  2. #38
    s361768 Guest

    Default

    Not that I want to justify this but my pregnancy did not occur at the best time financially for my partner and I. In answer to why I didn't save for a midwife if that was the birth I wanted.

    It is pretty bad that women have to pay so much for this option anyway.
    Look my previous labours and births were heading in the right direction until medically intervened with, these are my experiences.

    My doula is very experienced and I am well read on birth, as well as having had 3 previous pregnancy's, labours, births. I attend all my antenatal visits and have my blood pressure checked, urine, have had ultrasounds, bloods for GD, a liver condition I knew I didnt have etc etc.

    Have syntocinon on hand etc. I Know how to transfer to a hospital as well

    I know things can go wrong and I am not being naieve. I am sick of being made to feel like I have to walk around in fear and anguish of my life and baby's life. I thought birth was a natural process.

    Should I forgo birthing my baby at home and go to a public hospital because I don't have the finances for a midwife? Because that is getting a little political and discrimatory.

  3. #39

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    In Bankworld with Barbara
    Posts
    14,235

    Default

    It is a natural process and it really does suck that women who want to give birth outside the hospital system have to fight every inch of the way to get one. It sucks that experienced homebirth midwives are few and far between and in some cases unaffordable for those who want one - due to litigation and rising insurance costs. There shouldn't even be political debate about it - we should have the right to be able to chose our method of birth, but sadly the reality is that we have politicians that pander to the medical fraternity and don't *listen* to what women want in regards to this area. Of course the majority of women will continue to birth in a hospital/medicated setting but the choices should be there for those that want them.

    I apologise if I appeared to criticise you, that wasn't my intention at all. You have obviously thought it out and have things well in hand, but you can see the point I was trying to make. And there shouldn't be situations where women are so downright petrified of birthing in a hospital again that they are prepared to go to great lengths to do it alone, or with minimal assistance and without the essential tools they need to do it successfully.

  4. #40
    s361768 Guest

    Default

    NB. Have edited my post to make sense and added a couple of points...apologies

    You don't need to apologise, I can see the logic in what you are trying to say.

    I can see that medicine is needed in the birth process in some instances, and women that do become ill during pregnancy or birth are very lucky to have access to this.

    However I don't agree with doctor/hospital philosophy re. pregnancy and birth. They want to intervene too quickly to prevent litigation etc, [before giving the mother a chance to let her body do what it is designed to do] SO it is more about them than the [safety of] mother or baby.

    Also remember doctors make mistakes (they are human) and that is what they pay insurance for.

    It is political. And women are really not getting the options/quality of care they SHOULD have a right to during their reproductive lives, that is what sucks. Polititions should be investing more in the health and wellbeing of mothers as we are the ones birthing the future human capital of this country (I like to think of it that way)
    Last edited by s361768; January 13th, 2008 at 08:11 PM.

  5. #41

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    4,103

    Default

    Got to spread the rep around, Sushee, but I agree with your post. I too had a great hospital birth and I too think that choice is power. Hospitals aren't necessarily to blame, it is just unfortunate that there are so many health professionals out there who are unwilling to let a woman make a choice (without trying to guilt them either way, ie, "Your baby will die unless I...")
    I think all the posts I've read here have been positive toward homebirthing, and although I don't think I'll ever have one (on purpose ) I don't have a problem with them. I think we would all like to see the government cough up for our midwives in a manner that is totally reasonable and common sensical.
    So sorry for your bad experiences, s361768, I really hope this birth is wonderful and all you could hope for.

  6. #42

    Default

    I am sorry that I came across anti-hospital: if that is what the woman wants and she is respected then I am sure they can be great. Quite frankly, I know the hospital I birthed at quite well and they like to mess around with a woman in labour if at all possible. I do know of one person who managed to get out her baby drug-free and she had a 2-hour labour from start to finish!

    If there is anything "wrong" next time (breech bub, placenta prevaria, very long labour, waters break more than 24 hours before...) then I will go to hospital. But I won't be happy about it and will be taking handcuffs for obstetricians and as many proper support people as I can grab! But because I know my hospital and I know my DH I was wanting a freebirth before I gave birth (read some of my pregnancy posts if you don't believe me!) and I do think that everything would have been fine if that had happened. But hindsight is 20/20; I won't pretend I was happy with the hospital but... I dunno, I didn't really have support. I wouldn't have wanted to freebirth, I would have wanted support but it would have to be support for me, not support for interventions!

  7. #43

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    4,103

    Default

    I totally understand why you would feel the way you do, Ryn - your experience was truly awful. I wasn't having a go. I'm sure there are loads of people who have sadly shared a similar experience.

  8. #44

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    567

    Default

    My hospital experiences have improved with each birth!!! My first labour was long, epidural, 15hrs+ labour, 3rd degree tears. 2nd birth, 5 hrs, no drugs episiotomy for severe fetal distress, and I just couldn't push her out. 3rd birth, 2hrs, no drugs, beautiful labour, everything went well until I had a severe PPH, lost over a litre of blood, Drs wanted to transfuse me, but I was happy to wait and see how I went! Started on iron tabs and Hb slowly came up by itself. This truly scared me to bits as I was border line going to theatre anyway after birth as the bleeding was uncontrollable. So I spose anything can happen hey! But I have 3 beautiful kids, and I myself can live to tell the tales!!

  9. #45

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Margaret River
    Posts
    492

    Default

    wow!

    what a fantastic post...

    at the end of the day as a midwife I have to say that birthing with the support of a doula and a support person is fantastic, but to do so without the 'presence' of someone trained in birth, is not something I agree with

    I have seen the result of women choosing not to have any care, and even though it is extreme, it is not in the best of mother or child

    The increasing numbers of woman unhappy with the current medical model of maternity care, is resulting in the ever widening bridge between medical and what we believe is a natural process that should not be intruded apon. This leads to an increase in women seeking homebirth alternatives, but unfortunatley there are simply not enough HB midwives to go around.

    Politically speaking freebirth does not free women and their right to birth, in fact it hardens the resolve of the medical model to make birth safe (in there eyes) form many more women entering the hospital based system

    everyone has made some wonderful posts, and this is where the true passion for safe natural birth will help raise the voices of women in childbirth

    xx blue daisy

  10. #46

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,694

    Default

    Hmmm very interesting... here's my 2 cents worth...

    I think birth (like lots of things in life) is all about risk assessment and what level of risk you are prepared to accept. This "acceptable level of risk" will be different for everyone. There are well identified risks associated with giving birth, for the mother and the baby, that you can't do anything about. No amount of education or exercise or positioning or anything will prevent some of the things that sometimes happen during birth. Sometime it's just luck. And I'm not saying that things can't be done to help make all sorts of situations better, I'm just saying that sometimes all "other options" become exhausted.

    I think unnecessary medical intervention is a separate issue. To reduce this I think education is the key, of medical professionals, mothers, fathers, and society in general. You also need to have good communication between you and everyone around you. You need to feel that you are able to speak and will be listed to. You need to feel that you will be told what you need to know, when you need to know it without any "baggage" (e.g. like the anesthetist needs to have his lunch break in 30 mins). And if necessary, you need to change your situation so that you are more comfortable with the people around you (yes, I know, easier said than done).

    I had a wonderful hospital birth. It was truly the most amazing experience of my life. I had gas. I had an episiotomy. I was absolutely dreading having an epi, I told my ob this, we did everything we could to avoid it, but when the time came, DS was a compound presentation with his arm next to his head, a fast labour (my first and less than 4 hours from the very first contraction) and an epi was the best option for all of us at the time under the circumstances. So in the end I felt it really wasn't a big deal (for me) in the scheme of things.

    We have private heath insurance so I can choose my ob. Yes we can afford it but we choose to afford it, going without many, many, many other things because it is a priority for us as a family.
    Last edited by Epacris; January 14th, 2008 at 10:55 AM.

  11. #47
    s361768 Guest

    Default

    I think at the end of the day it is their back pockets, that medical professionals are worried about.
    I don't think that giving a woman the best possible environment and atmosphere to birth really enters their minds. Obs and hospital midwifes control every aspect of a woman's pregnancy, labour and birth for the health of mother and child (true) SO in the end they avoid the potential for litigation.

    This means time limits on pregnancy, induction, time limits on birth, a 1 in 3 chance of a CS and through all this women are to remain passive and accepting when all this is happening to their body and newborn.

    If they (Polititions and the medical fraternity) cared so much about lowering the rates of maternal and infant mortality amonst Australian women, why are so many indigenous women and babies dying? The quality of health care provided to them in their communities is practically 3rd world.

    Anyway back on track, and in response to Epacris's post, I know that I am not the only woman who had gone been through traumatic birth, and I know I am not the only woman looking to avoid it at all costs.

    If I could afford full hospital coverage, barely affording the extras (and knowing what I know now) I would still avoid the hospital and opt for a midwife (if I could get one, considering I am a VBAC even after my natural birth and a natural prior to that).

    Epacris it is great that you can choose to afford private health for your family thus have a private OB for your pregnancy/ies. But this doesn't guarantee you of a better treatment and outcome, although I do here that the food is better and that the nurses smile more in the private system.

    In addition, Just because our family dont have full comp hosp cover and "don't choose to afford it" doesn't mean health is not a top priority of our family, everyones circumstances are different.
    Last edited by s361768; January 14th, 2008 at 08:43 PM.

  12. #48

    Default

    I think one of the great things about the baby bonus in Australia is that it means that most people can afford a midwife.
    Many private midwives are prepared to accept installments and payment after the bonus comes through

  13. #49
    s361768 Guest

    Default

    That is a really bold statement,

    I dont drink my baby bonus away, like I said in my last post everyone's family circumstances are different this includes financial circumstances.

    I pay $1000,00 out of BB for my doula. Last BB we had our car repaired things pop up, This time I owe my university $3500 after graduation. However I guess if I don't use it for a midwife????

    Why are midwifes so expensive for women wanting a different approach to care during preg etc

  14. #50
    s361768 Guest

    Default

    To add, I thought the polititions said that the baby bonus was specifically to assist for the costs of a new baby coming into the family.

    This may include morgage repayments because of family going down to 1 income, this money may also enable a woman to rest and take time off work rather than putting child in daycare faciltiy at 6 weeks and racing straight back out into the workforce.

    Why should a woman have to hand this BB over to a midwife??? Why can't the government provide more assistance for women wanting to employ midwifes for their pregs and also make it possible for midwifes to provide support for women during childbirth?

  15. #51

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Ubiquity
    Posts
    9,937

    Default

    What I think Chloe is trying to say is that it could make things easier. I don't think it was meant as an attack. In most cases there are options for people that want them or need them. But I do agree as I said earlier in my previous post that midwifery care shouldn't be something we have to pay off in instalments it should be free, as free as birthing in a public hospital.

  16. #52

    Default

    TBH I don't think that midwives are expensive. Try and find another professional who has had the years of training and education that most independant midwives have who will only charge you around 4k for ongoing support (including unlimited phone calls), home visits before (usually an hour each visit), education (including the loan of texts and DVDs) and after labour (up to 6 weeks) and be on call for a midnight call-out if nessescary then stay for a shift that could be in excess of 12 hours.

    If you pay for an ob and a private hospital stay you're looking at at least twice that and often more.

    ETA - Yes they should be free but I don't think it's fair to complain about how expensive they are when most of them charge the bare minimum and less than they deserve. Feel free to complain about the government not supporting midwifry - I'll support you but it really bugs me when people assume that midwives shouldn't have the right to charge adequately for thier services. We expect every other proffession to recieve recompense for thier skills so why is it that midwives are supposed to do it for love.

  17. #53
    paradise lost Guest

    Default

    But that's still 4k more than a public hospital Ob birth Dach. I think midwives should be well-paid but i don't see why a woman should have to pay out of pocket for a birth which would actually be cheaper to the state than the one they will provide. Good maternity care would have provision for homebirths and midwives but i suspect that as is the case here in the UK it is easier to regulate hospital births, thus they paper over the cracks of staffing problems, insurance issues and costs by only offering the most regulatable option for free.

    Bx

  18. #54

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,694

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by s361768 View Post
    Epacris it is great that you can choose to afford private health for your family thus have a private OB for your pregnancy/ies. But this doesn't guarantee you of a better treatment and outcome, although I do here that the food is better and that the nurses smile more in the private system.
    Yes, but I believe my education and my attitude do guarantee me the birth that I want.
    Last edited by Epacris; January 14th, 2008 at 09:24 PM.

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Gestational Diabetes - The Emperor Has No Clothes by Henci Goer
    By BellyBelly in forum Gestational Diabetes
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: March 28th, 2011, 05:44 PM
  2. Ricki Lake Birth Documentary: The Business of Being Born
    By BellyBelly in forum Birth Activism
    Replies: 87
    Last Post: June 18th, 2010, 12:14 PM
  3. Update on Doula problems in Ireland
    By BellyBelly in forum Birth Information & Education - Articles and Clips
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: August 25th, 2007, 10:23 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •