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Thread: Kelly (BellyBelly) might be interested in this...

  1. #19

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    I am faced with the "should I refuse?" dilemma atm too. I have been told that because of my previous two hemorrhages after delivering the placenta that I will need to have a cannula put in my hand during labour in order for them to infuse synto after the birth in order to stop/reduce another PPH. I am ok with that. I would rather that than bleed and bleed and need a blood transfusion. My concern is that because the cannula will be in my hand prior to giving birth that it will be all too easy for them to suggest augmentation of labour. I am not ok with that, because I believe that my previous PPHs may have been due to that fact that i was augmented, and also because this is to be my last pregnancy and I would like to experience a normal labour, and not one that has been artificially started with drugs. I am going to discuss this with my midwife at my next appointment which is on Friday, just to reiterate that while I understand why I need the drug at the end, I do not want to be induced or augmented.


  2. #20

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    May 2004
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    Bon - could you ask that they don't put the cannula in until you're ready to start pushing? That should leave plenty of time for what they want it for, yet it won't be in there for your whole labour.
    I don't see why they couldn't do that?

  3. #21

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    Bon, artificial oxytocin (syntocinon) use in labour can increase the risk of PPH. This is from Sarah Buckley's article on the natural approach to third stage of labour, in the birth section:

    "Other western practices that may contribute to PPH include the use of oxytocin for induction and augmentation (speeding up labour)28 29 episiotomy or perineal trauma, forceps delivery, caesarean and previous caesarean (because of placental problems- see Hemminki30).

    Gilbert notes that PPH rates in her UK hospital more than doubled from 5% in 1969-70 to 11% in 1983-5, and concludes, 'The changes in labour ward practice over the last 20 years have resulted in the re-emergence of PPH as a significant problem.'31 In particular, she links an increased risk of bleeding with induction using oxytocin, forceps delivery, long first and second stages (but not prolonged pushing) and the use of epidurals, which increase the chance of forceps and of a long second stage."
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children
    Author of Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know
    Follow me in 2015 as I go Around The World + Kids!
    Forever grateful to my incredible Mod Team and many wonderful members who have been so supportive since 2003.

  4. #22
    lisa-jay Guest

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    ARGHGHGH sorry sorry sorry, the book is by Pat Thomas......... no idea where I got the name Sally Inch from!!!!! Its got lots of research that completely contradicts current practice, and it WILL give you confidence to question and/or refuse routine practice.

  5. #23
    lisa-jay Guest

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    Just wanted to add a couple more points.
    An episiotomy always involves muscle, where as a tear will only tear what needs to be torn, (if you know what I mean..) it can range from a graze, to a 3rd degree.... usually the bad tears are as a result of women pushing the baby out, and not working with contractions and nearly always if they are birthing on their backs. However, what a lot of women often dont realise, is that an episiotomy, can also tear...beyond what would ever have happened in nature. Its a barbaric practice and actually very rarely required. The only time I have seen it done when it needed to be done, was a baby being born with both hands by her ears...and she kept peeking out and going back in....(mum was on her back though ) all the others have been performed to hurry things along.
    Bon, perhaps you might like to consider a completely natural 3rd stage. You have less chance of PPH and the back up of synto if you do.

  6. #24

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    Kelly I found that out about synto and PPH after I had Grace. My mum was actually told that by an OB at her hospital as she mentioned my case to him - she told him I had had two previous PPH and his response was "Did she have synto?".
    If I had known that before I would not have agreed to be augmented with her. I actually didn't think that it would happen again after I had Harry - I put it down to the difficult birth I had with him so I didn't think it to be a concern the 2nd time around. I have been told that the cannula is a precaution so that if need be they can shoot me up quickly after giving birth. Both times I started hemorrhaging straight away pretty much, so I figure if I don't have synto during labour then after I give birth if I don't start to bleed profusely then they won't need to use the cannula. But I will need to clarify all this with the midwife on friday. Maybe a natural 3rd stage could be an option, although I know that the hospital would not be in favour of it.

  7. #25
    lisa-jay Guest

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    The hospital will most likely quote you a British study that showed women were actually more likely to PPH after a natural 3rd stage. The study was very flawed, as "natural 3rd stage" actually meant no drugs but cord traction. Cord traction is a really bad practice the placenta can take over an hour to come away but hospitals like the birthing room cleared up and out asap, so they tend to "hurry things along" hence tugging on the cord, not allowing nature to take its course and interferring with a process that usually a body is perfectly capable of doing. Synto can be a great drug in teh case of PPH, but really shouldnt be used as routine.
    If you do go for a natural 3rd stage, ensure that what you actually mean is...leave me alone, hands off my cord! If they tug, you are certainly more likely to end up with problems. Its really your decision, and if you request not to have synto routinely, they really have to respect it, whether they like it or not.

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