thread: obesity and dilation

  1. #37

    Jun 2010
    District Twelve
    8,425

    Fat vaginas have trouble getting pregnant too!


  2. #38
    Registered User

    Nov 2009
    Vic
    1,292

    Why are the intervention rates so high in Australia if they are all medically necessary? Is it something we as Australian women lack, for the intervention rates to be so necessarily high?
    Well we are one of the fattest countries in the world it's probably all those fat vaginas.
    Fat vaginas have trouble getting pregnant too!
    Abit off topic girls don't you think? TBH I'm not finding any of this helpful so please.....
    This isn't about fat vaginas, or having trouble TTC....




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  3. #39
    Registered User

    Sep 2009
    Melbourne, VIC
    581

    As one of the health care providers you speak about 'Trillian' I would like to give you a different perspective. As I can speak for every midwife, ob etc. this ofcourse is my opinion and what the protocol is in my department.

    Women 'do' get time in labour and when we have to intervene it is usually at the very last moment. Why do we intervene, because studies and previous situations have shown that not every woman will labour 'just as well' as you put it. As a mother of two, I do understand the emotion and determination to birth your babies but I can also see from the other side and to them, it is to ensure your baby arrives as safely and healthy as it can. The demands and physical response to labour doesnt just affect the mother but baby too. And while, you are right, that many women can birth their perfect babies on their own in another couple of hours without the need for ARM and drugs many dont and we are able to help them take home their babies without even considering the alternative of what could have happened.
    I'd love to know where abouts you work so I can head there if I ever need to have a baby in hospital! The hospitals where I live have a very different approach.

  4. #40
    Registered User

    Sep 2007
    Brisbane
    5,729

    I thought this thread was about a request for information. Aren't we all about being informed? Making informed, well researched decisions? I don't actually see anyone making a "fat vagina" argument in a negative way. We don't need to turn every thread into a rant about how doctors intervene too much and remove birth choices.

  5. #41

    Jun 2010
    District Twelve
    8,425

    Delphmoon, I said it in a tongue in cheek way but I was making the point that obesity has implications for reproduction generally.

  6. #42
    Registered User

    Sep 2007
    Brisbane
    5,729

    That's true N2L, it really does. I has an impact in birth too but I'd rather be informed. I'm a really freaking annoying patient to have because I have printed off one of those papers to bring in my birth folder . If I can remind DH to show the MW/Obs that obese women can dilate slower and yet still perfectly safely, I have more ammo to tell them where to go. Not all information needs to be viewed as a tool for unwanted intervention... it can be useful .

  7. #43
    Registered User

    Nov 2009
    Vic
    1,292

    thanks M

    As an obese woman who has struggled with dilation in my last 2 births, I needed to know if larger women in general do have issues dilating and if so why- so I can do something about it....

    Its rude and unfair to turn this into a thread about anything else.

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  8. #44
    Registered User

    Nov 2009
    Vic
    1,292

    Delphmoon, I said it in a tongue in cheek way but I was making the point that obesity has implications for reproduction generally.
    well sorry but I didn't find it helpful.

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  9. #45
    Registered User

    Nov 2009
    Vic
    1,292

    That's true N2L, it really does. I has an impact in birth too but I'd rather be informed. I'm a really freaking annoying patient to have because I have printed off one of those papers to bring in my birth folder . If I can remind DH to show the MW/Obs that obese women can dilate slower and yet still perfectly safely, I have more ammo to tell them where to go. Not all information needs to be viewed as a tool for unwanted intervention... it can be useful .
    soo spot on to what I am trying to say.
    If i had the info I could stand up for myself more and therefore avoid further interventions

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  10. #46
    Registered User

    Dec 2005
    In Bankworld with Barbara
    14,222

    I thought it was just following the natural progression of the discussion. You can't talk about something like that and not talk about the impact that it will have in reality. If anyone can take those studies to a Doctor and actually have them take on board the findings of the study and let you labour for longer then that is fantastic. I am genuinely hoping that is the case. However the reality is much harsher. Many, many women who even try to do their research and get informed are virtually patted on the head, eye-rolled and told not to google if they present their information to their doctors. If I had a dollar for every woman who was scoffed at when they presented their care provider with a nicely typed and well thought out birth plan I'd be rich.

  11. #47
    Registered User

    Nov 2009
    Vic
    1,292

    Its not easy to ask for help when your admitted your obese and had trouble labouring.
    I think that yes, I should be able to do a thread and not expect it to go down the whole ' too much interventions, doctors don't know everything' track.
    I was thinking I would get more supportive posts, personal stories, suggestions etc rather than rants about validity of studies etc.

    Sigh....

    Anyway....


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  12. #48
    Registered User

    Sep 2009
    Melbourne, VIC
    581

    Its not easy to ask for help when your admitted your obese and had trouble labouring.
    I think that yes, I should be able to do a thread and not expect it to go down the whole ' too much interventions, doctors don't know everything' track.
    I was thinking I would get more supportive posts, personal stories, suggestions etc rather than rants about validity of studies etc.

    Sigh....

    Anyway....


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    I misunderstood your intentions with starting this thread, delphmoon - and I apologise for that. I think it does follow that comments like 'fat women dilate slower' are unhelpful and the greater impact may be restricted birth choices and unnecessary intervention.

    Regardless of whether there's any statistical truth in the statement, I think you should still reasonably expect to be treated with care and respect. If it's helpful for you to take studies like M listed into an appointment as back up to ask that your care provider take a wait and watch approach then I think you should absolutely do that and I hope they respond well to your efforts to be informed. My experience: my labour was 42 hours (only 35mins of that was pushing) and I'm a size 12-14 (have a normal BMI). I was pretty tired but had a midwife who supported my wishes and didn't intervene because it wasn't necessary to.

  13. #49
    Registered User

    Nov 2009
    Vic
    1,292

    thankyou :-)

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  14. #50
    Registered User

    Dec 2005
    In Bankworld with Barbara
    14,222

    You didn't say that in your OP - how was anyone to know you actually wanted help and advice? I took your OP to mean that you'd heard some comment you thought sounded a bit ridiculous and you wanted to know if there was anything to it. had i known that you wanted to hear from women who had BTDT, then I would have responded to the thread differently, so I apologise for that.

    From my perspective (and purely anecdotal) I have had 4 births. For 3 of them I would have been in a higher range BMI. It didn't affect my ability to dilate or labour at all. My labours were all under 12 hours. Although the 3rd one was induced with syncto and it was also incidentally the fastest of my 3 births at 4.5hrs. the 2nd and 4th were 8hrs and 6hrs long. never was it suggested to me that my size would/could have an impact on the way I would progress with my labour. I think that if you really wanted to make a point of it when you have your next baby then emphasise how your first two births were - you have that history of previous labour that is going to count for far more than your size will. Analyse your births - were they active, were you supported by people who encouraged you to stay active or try new positions that may help you, did you labour on your back, was there any emotional issues that could have made things slower, did you have an epidural etc. All of these things can impact on the way your body works during labour and it would be a good idea to look closely at your first two births and see if there is anything there that could have been the trigger.

    Good luck

  15. #51
    Registered User

    Nov 2009
    Vic
    1,292

    TBH- For both labors Im glad I was induced. Both labors I starting contracting on my own. the first birth I had contractions every 4-5 minutes for 2 days. My second I got stuck for a day at contractions at 2.5 minutes...I Didn't dilate with either and with both labours I was 41.6 weeks and 42 +1 weeks. With both I asked for induction in the end and with both I gave birth within the hour after induction so I think I have an issue dilating....lol...
    I was super active with both labours and had my hubby and mum present. I knew my midwife very well so emotionally I was good.
    Im not pregnant at the moment but we are planning on afew more. I believe my birth issues are related to me not dilating...maybe a cervical dilation exercise exists out there...lol...anyway...no one has been able to tell me why i wasn't dilating...any ideas?

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  16. #52
    Registered User

    Sep 2009
    Melbourne, VIC
    581

    I read something recently about scar tissue on the cervix potentially being a factor that might affect dilation (from biopsies, infection s etc)...could that be a possibility? From memory the examples I've read, women stalled at a particular point in their labour each time (each had birthed a few times) - one woman had a MW that suspected scar tissue was the problem and massaged the cervix which broke up the scarring and the woman then fully dilated. Now I wish I'd saved it!!
    Last edited by e_p; July 13th, 2012 at 08:18 PM.

  17. #53
    Registered User

    Sep 2007
    Brisbane
    5,729

    It might not be your weight at all. While obesity does seem to factor into it, the variance components basically says no more than 30% of the blame (it's a crap word to use, but you hopefully know what I mean) about dilation arrest is attributed to obesity and obesity related issues. So even if you were obese at the next birth, there is still a LOT (70%) of variation in outcome still unexplained.

  18. #54
    BellyBelly Member
    Add ~*Niadalla*~ on Facebook

    Jan 2007
    VIC
    2,199

    ACtually that's what the first study said. That we could consider allowing obese women more time to labor in first stage because it appears to be part of normal variation for them. Same with stage 2 - the studies actually came down on the side of the obese women and said they could push as well as everyone else and didn't need any intervention just because of their weight.
    Yes it certainly does and I wasn't saying it didn't say that..... but can you REALLY see obstetricians and other birthing professionals ACTUALLY letting larger women labour longer? I got told by my public ob who hadn't even opened my file and had never set eyes on me in his life, that because of my size I would have a Csect. I had a 95% chance if I was really desperate to attempt labour, but he wouldn't suggest it. I bawled.
    Thankfully all but 3 hours of my 38.5hour labour were spent at home allowing me to do what I wanted. I was too stubborn and I had more faith in myself than most, to allow someone to bully me into full blown intervention. I was able to avoid everything but the gas although I barely used it anyway. I birthed vaginally with no complications.

    While the studies might say it's natural for larger women to labour longer, I can't see anyone allowing that to happen unfortunately. I wish that pregnant mothers weren't judged on a few notes someone might have in front of them.

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