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Thread: Since when is Syntocin recommended by

  1. #19

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    Ummm.... *cough* Its so important to have good birth support for those reasons, someone who can advocate for you, in times of vulnerability or fogginess. *cough*



    Kelly xx

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  2. #20

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    HAHA Thanks Kel

  3. #21

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    Some searching has unearthed a reference in the WHO's "Better Birthing Initiatve" Package, which does indeed recommend the routine use of syntocinon for all women, with the justification that it is a safe way of reducing the risk of PPH. While syntocinon itself is not harmful, it does necessitate the early clamping of the cord which some (myself included) believe is detrimental to the baby.

    Unfortuately, I do not have access to the WHO Reproductive Health Library, and the Better Birthing Initiatve made its recommendation regarding syntocionon based on an article in this library from 2001. However, it is important to remember that much of the work of the WHO targets less developed countries who often have poor access to medical facilities and poorly-trained medical and health practitioners. In these circumstances, I guess that the routine use of syntocinon is a safe way of reducing the risk of a PPH. Of course, we are not in those circumstances (unless you count the poorly trained health professional bit...). We are well-nourished, well-educated, have medical facilities readily available, and if we choose an independently practicing midwife or are attending a birth centre whose model of care allows for some kind of continuity of care, then we have a trusted health professional with us. Additionally, if we are well educated, healthy, and pursue an active labour, our risk of intervention is reduced. All of these things reduce the likelihood of a PPH.

    You have my permission to tell the midwife that at the next appointment, if you are there, Trish...

    And for a vent about the sad state of antenatal education and how midwives who actually try and empower women are treated, head over to the Boohoo forum...

  4. #22

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    Thanks a heap for that Michael. I must remember that. Hopefully Simone won't get that midwife again anyway. Fingers crossed hey.

  5. #23
    kiki Guest

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    oh god don't get me started on that bloody birth centre, it's not a bc, it's 3 pretty rooms in the corner of a labour ward. Trust me, I worked there!!. The midwives don't have any extra training in natural birth and alot of the time it is a case of "who wants to work in the BC?" "don't pick me" Good on you for sticking up for Simone, stick to your guns esspecially with the due date thing. I'd be asking that midwife why she was changing the date keeping in mind that if Simone is sure of her dates then that is more accurate than an ultrasound date. I went 11 days over with my second baby and the hospital here (which I was only booked in "just in case" as I was havig a homebirth) scared the **** out of me telling me that the "chance of mortality after 41 weeks doubles" I came home an did my research and, yes, it does double, but from 0.1% to 0.2%!!! so I can only imagine what it is like for women that arn't midwives.
    Secondly shmickers, darling, you are wrong. Syntocinon is harmful in a way. As the establishment of breastfedding requires the correct and delicately balanced levels of hormones including oxytocin (the natural form of syntocinon) a massive dose of synto as the baby is born stuffs up the hormone levels and can have a detrimental effect on the establishment of a good milk supply.
    Syntocinon only came into use when AIDS really came apparent, as a way of sparing women needing a blood transfusion as they didn't want to risk anyone getting AIDS. Like everything in obstetrics it has been blown out of all proportion. The midwives at that bc wouldn't even know that not having it is an option. As long as you have had a normal labour and birth it is not necessary but keep in mind the placenta can take up to a few hours to birth in a pysiological 3rd stage and there is no way a hopital will ait that long, they'll take you off to OT for a manual removal at the 30 minute mark. And as for 1st babies being long labours- my first baby was 3 hours as they offten are if left alone! My advice would be to keep Simone at home as long as possible and go in fully dilated or better still have a homebirth!!! You know what you're doing Trisha!!!!

  6. #24

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    With my luck ill probably get the same midwife when i go into labour...eeekk!

    Simone

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