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Thread: Flat nipples - what can I do next time round

  1. #1

    Default Flat nipples - what can I do next time round

    With my daughter I initially had major issues breastfeeding. I was told my nipples were very flat and she had trouble attaching. This resulted in a very stressful first few weeks of expressing full time/nipple shields until she was finally able to attach.



    So I'm wondering next time if there's anything I can do to be more prepared and avoid these issues. I guess it will be easier next time knowing what I know (that it does get easier) but I've seen these products you can buy that supposedly fix flat nipples (eg niplette) :? Has anyone used these? Do they work or are they a waste of money? I'm kinda worried it would do damage

  2. #2

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    I had the exact same problem- I used the nipple shields until about 8 weeks when he could suck harder and attach better. My LC actually said that next time round I might not have that problem as they may have stretched enough to accomodate newborn suckling.
    I've seen the niplette but not sure how effective it would be...?

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by LoriRae View Post
    My LC actually said that next time round I might not have that problem as they may have stretched enough to accomodate newborn suckling.
    Mine have totally returned to normal after I stopped breastfeeding I hope it doesn't happen to you!

  4. #4

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    Kylie, joining the ABA would be the best advice I can give you. And also find a LC in your area (pick a IBCLC certified one), and have both the ABA helpline and the LC's numbers handy when you go to hossy.

    I was told that I had flat nipples when DS1 was born. It turns out he also had a tongue-tie which was a bigger problem, and after that was snipped we managed to attach without nipple shields. When DS2 was born I was told I had great nipples for bfing - go figure!! So you well might be right this time around. But if not, you will know where to get advice and support, so I am sure you will find it easier than last time.

    Best of luck and well done for being so successful with DD1 after facing such hurdles.

  5. #5

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    HI,
    Congratulaions on your pregnancy. It is normal to be a bit aprehensive about the early days. I have to agree with Manta - the best preparation goes on in your mind.
    The first feed is very important. Babies don't know what nipples "should" be like - they love the ones they are given. If your baby is born normally, without drugs, that will give him or a her a great start. It is important that babies be kept skin to skin with the mum, and be allowed to feed early. They are very alert and aware in this period - primed to feed. And they will tend to "imprint" a way of feeding (that's why it's important we don't give newborns bottles)
    You may find it really useful to do an ABA class, and borrow Sue Cox's dvd "Mom and Baby I can do that".
    It sounds like, despite the early setbacks you did a great job with your first baby. Good on you! I'm sure that with this one you will do fine
    Regards
    Barb

  6. #6

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    My LC actually said that next time round I might not have that problem as they may have stretched enough to accomodate newborn suckling....
    I think this could happen, I know it has with me.

    I had one flat and one inverted nipple. It wasnt easy, and DS refused to suck at all with sheilds so we did it without them, but I was able to feed him til around 6 months.

    Now they are still flatish but 100 times better than they were, and one that seemed inverted isnt anymore.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barb Glare View Post
    The first feed is very important. Babies don't know what nipples "should" be like - they love the ones they are given. If your baby is born normally, without drugs, that will give him or a her a great start. It is important that babies be kept skin to skin with the mum, and be allowed to feed early. They are very alert and aware in this period - primed to feed. And they will tend to "imprint" a way of feeding (that's why it's important we don't give newborns bottles)
    Thanks Barb,

    This is why I am hoping to prepare now for the next time, as my baby could not attach at all for that first feed which was pretty disappointing. She also had to have bottles as it was the only way she could get any milk. This was under the advice of the hospital lactation consultant, but is there another way I could have fed her EBM without a bottle??

  8. #8

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    Kylie, I am hoping that you will have fewer attachment issues this time around, and that certainly is possible. However if you need to give EBM in those early days again you can actually give it in a cup. I know my DS was feed colostrum this way (as well as using a syringe), and then I used a bottle after my milk came in until we got the nipple shields working. But we could have kept going with a cup if I had known that then, babies can drink from a cup if you hold it for them. It's probably a slower way of doing it, but could be worth it if it prevents future bfing problems. I really hope you don't need to do that though!

  9. #9

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    Hi,
    Tell me a bit about your first birth? How did that go? Was she put up onto your tummy, skin to skin? Was she separated from your for any length of time? Did you have pethadine? Or other drugs? Do you have any indications of how your next birth might go?
    As Manta said, you can get colostrum into your baby with a cup, spoon or syringe - but with some good planning you might not need that.
    Remember - get sue cox's "Mom and baby I can do that and WATCH it! and do a breastfeeding class with ABA.
    Warm Regards
    Barb

  10. #10

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    Hi Barb,

    I had an emergency c section, so yes she was separated from me. Obvioulsy I also had an epidural before this too but no other drugs.

    Do you think this could be a factor? I though if anything it could affect the first feed, but she could attach at all for days....

    Kylie

  11. #11

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    Hi Kylie

    I asked the same question a few months ago, so hopefully this thread http://bellybelly.com.au/forums/brea...t-nipples.html may be of help to you.

    Good luck and best wishes!

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