View Poll Results: If your milk didn't come in, would you use a breastmilk bank?

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  • Yes, I would have no hesitation

    37 32.17%
  • No, I would opt for formula

    49 42.61%
  • I am not sure / undecided

    29 25.22%
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Thread: If you had no breastmilk, would you use a breastmilk bank?

  1. #181

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    Ok - It's taken me all afternoon to read through this! Very interesting.

    Yes, I would use the milk bank in an instant. I think it's the most natural thing in the world to use it. If my bubba was sick/premmie I would do whatever I could that was thought to help. I would also trust that that the processing/screening process would be 100% because otherwise they wouldn't have been given the go ahead to start it up.
    I would also donate. I think it's great that there is no payment involved as I think only very special women would take the time to donate and would naturally remove the unhealthy type people from donating.

    I can appreciate most peoples opinions/points of view on here at the same time though and I'm sure if for any of you it was a life/death situation for your child you would do whatever it took including milk from a milk bank.

    Brooke - Just wanted to say that I agree with the rubbish food some people give their kids. Absolutely ridiculous!



    Fiona - I think you are a great asset in regards to bf and I also agree with a lot of what you've said.

    It is a personal choice and each to their own!

  2. #182
    mummyof7 Guest

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    fruitwood,
    My milk came in on day 4 with all 7 of my kids, the first 1-3 days is colestrum. I dont know why they gave up on day 2.

    Re: the question..
    If my baby was premmie and/or sick to need BM from the milkbank, s/he would definately have it. If s/he could survive on formula, I would choose formula first before someone elses milk. JMO.

    I would also donate, to help other sick/premmy babies.
    Last edited by mummyof7; September 4th, 2006 at 05:22 PM.

  3. #183

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    That made perfect sense, Brooke, and is sort of where I'm coming from too. You really want to know what people are putting in your baby's food: EBM you don't know about caffine/alcohol/drugs/additives, at least with formula you know exactly what's in it! OK, some people would argue that EBM is healthier even with the additives, it's just the not-knowing that would get me: what if I'm feeding my baby nicotine/cannabis... at least with formula you know that you aren't. It's easy to lie on the forms. Probably why I would donate but be hesitant about accepting.

  4. #184

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    Makes pefect sense Brooke. And I totally agree with you

  5. #185

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    Just found this info on the Kellymom site regarding maternal diet and breastfeeding, basically diet is more of an issue for the mother, the breast milk still comes out fine:

    Do I need to maintain a perfect diet while breastfeeding?
    The short answer to this question is NO – you do not need to maintain a perfect diet in order to provide quality milk for your baby. In fact, research tells us that the quality of a mother’s diet has little influence on her milk. Nature is very forgiving – mother’s milk is designed to provide for and protect baby even in times of hardship and famine. A poor diet is more likely to affect the mother than her breastfed baby.

    It's common to hear women say that they want to wean (or not breastfeed at all) because they miss drinking coffee, or want to have an occasional glass of wine, or don't like worrying constantly about everything they eat. Guess what? You can drink caffeinated beverages (in moderation), have an occasional drink, eat what you want and still provide your baby with the absolute best nutrition and immunological protection - mother's own milk.

    According to Katherine A. Dettwyler, Ph.D., breastfeeding researcher and anthropologist, women throughout the world make ample amounts of quality milk while eating diets composed almost entirely of rice (or millet or sorghum) with a tiny amount of vegetables and occasional meat.

    Are healthy eating habits recommended for mom? Absolutely! You will be healthier and feel better if you eat well. It is best for anyone to eat a variety of foods, in close to their naturally-occurring state, but this is not necessary for providing quality milk or for maintaining milk supply. Although it is certainly not recommended, a breastfeeding mother could live on a diet of junk food – mom would not thrive on that diet, but her milk would still meet her baby's needs.

  6. #186
    Debbie Lee Guest

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    Hmm yeah... I was wondering about that. Thanks for the info, Astrid
    In the first few weeks of having Gabby home, I came down with gastro and I was really worried that Gabby would catch it through my BM. However, I was told by the MCHN that it was highly unlikely to happen. Gabby was fine and didn't get gastro even though I fed right through it all.

  7. #187

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    It's common to hear women say that they want to wean (or not breastfeed at all) because they miss drinking coffee, or want to have an occasional glass of wine, or don't like worrying constantly about everything they eat. Guess what? You can drink caffeinated beverages (in moderation), have an occasional drink, eat what you want and still provide your baby with the absolute best nutrition and immunological protection - mother's own milk.
    But how do we know the donor has been "in moderation" and hasn't taken any illegal substances? Whilst I said before I wouldn't be averse to the occasional drinkie, but for me that's 1-2 a week, not 4-5 a night (as some people may see an "occasional" drink).

  8. #188
    Debbie Lee Guest

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    Wouldn't the screening process also cover the lifestyle of the women donating?

  9. #189

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    Depends how they filled in the form - would you tick a box that said you used recreational drugs and fed your child with that? Then again, maybe that sort of person isn't the sort of person who would donate? I don't know though, maybe they would.

  10. #190
    Debbie Lee Guest

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    Surely it would be more involved than just filling out a form?? Well... one would assume.
    Ryn - yeah.... I was thinking that. Would someone who abused substances like that have the wherewithall to donate BM?

  11. #191

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    Wouldn't the screening process also cover the lifestyle of the women donating?
    I would l think so. I also would think (could be completly wrong I guess) that a women who was donating BM would be one who has nothing to gain other then the satisfaction of bein gable to provide such a gift. Women who donate, don't get paid. Also they are looking for mothers who have a young baby & who's milk supply is established. So I guess their ideal mother would be one of a baby who is say 6 to 8 weeks old. I would like to think that any new mother who is passionate & caring enough to donate to the cause would be one who would meet the criteria with flying colours. I am taking a chance here & hope this comes out right, But I would think that someone who has a un healthy lifestyle & felt the need to be misleading about their lifestyle when going through the screening process, probably wouldn't actually be there in the first place. God I hope that comes out right!
    Can anyone one explain that better?

    Also Ryn, The 4 -5 drinks a night would surly show up in BM when it goes through its screening process. After all alchole levels show up in BM just like it does in Blood. I am sure the same would be for illegal drugs also. So If the milk came back with any positives for those things it woudl not be used. Does anyone know if caffeine can be tested for in the same way?

  12. #192
    Debbie Lee Guest

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    Fiona - I understand what you mean. It's not exactly something that a person would go through if they had something to hide, hey?

  13. #193

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    Thats it, its not like they would be gaining anything from it as far as money went.

    Oh I forgot, Gabby would have actually been recieving anti-bodies to help protect her against the gastro you had while feeding her. Your body would have been producing the antibodies against the bug & then they would be passed throught the BM to Gabby. By continuing to feed while the mother is sick is a really good thing to do, because of the anti-bodies that are passed on through BM.
    I too had a bout of Gastro while Glenn was little, Evan had it, then I got it, then DH had it. Everyone but Glenn. I even started expressing milk for Evan to have. I didn't think of the anti-body side of things when doing that, i just thought if thats all I can get him to have & keep down, its probabl the best thing I could offer.

  14. #194

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    I had post quickly with my last post, I was posting more in reference to maternal diet, as in food, not alcohol or drugs, I just didn't think it was appropriate to edit the information.

    I would not donate myself if I had been drinking, taking medication, or recreational drugs, so to receive I would not the donating mother to that either. As for diet, if it had such a major effect on the make-up of breastmilk, I doubt we would have survived that well as a species through droughts, famine, floods etc. So it is really in the best interests of the donor to eat well

  15. #195

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    I think there is a difference between the nutritional component of food and the types of foods that affect some little tummies. Just because some babies are affected by cabbage for example, does not make all breast milk nutrionally deficient and not suitable for use by others. Other than caffiene I have not found any particular food I have eaten really affects Maggie, it affects me more LOL!

    ETA Where there a known foods that are the main culprits for upset tummies, maybe the breastmilk bank should advise donors to avoid those foods.

  16. #196

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    But your diet can affect your BM. My SIl is living proof of that. As soon as she cut out the stuff causing the probs, my nephew was a diff. baby.
    If it doesn't then why do some Mums have to cut out certain foods etc because it affects bubs...
    Yep I agree, Evan was effected by things I ate.

    I think there is a difference between the nutritional component of food and the types of foods that affect some little tummies. Just because some babies are affected by cabbage for example, does not make all breast milk nutrionally deficient and not suitable for use by others. Other than caffiene I have not found any particular food I have eaten really affects Maggie, it affects me more LOL!
    Yep I agree yet again. I never had a problem with foods I ate affecting Glenn. So Same milk, same diet, yet to different outcomes on my kids.
    I wonder if there would be a requirement to avoid certin food types for 12 to 24 hours (like spicy, curries etc) before expressing to donate. After all most of the foods that people do find to have issues with are gone from the milk after 24 hours. For example, if your bub had a "windy/colic" day & you suspect it may have been something you ate, look back at what it was you ate 12 hours before the "bad" day started. Avoid it for at least 24 hours & all should be good again.

  17. #197

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    The same could be said of the mother breastfeeding her own premmie bub tho. Coz it takes trial and error to work out what in your diet could be affecting the bub (if it's the diet at all) and this could last the length of time that bub is in that sensitive early state. But ultimately the nutrients and antibodies etc etc are all still there and beneficial to the baby.

    They're all valid points, but I think I'd still be inclined to choose breastmilk over formula for those early days for the premmy, regardless of diet sensitivities, because that can happen with your own milk anyway, and BM is digested so much easier, that it's sure to be better on their little tummies. That's what I reckon anyway

  18. #198

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    I guess the diet sensitivities could be one of the "risks/side effects" that all medications have. Like I said b4 I see EBM for a premmie baby as a medication. Same as the "risk/side effect" that FF would have would be the increased risk of gut infections in a premmie baby.

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