View Poll Results: If your milk didn't come in, would you use a breastmilk bank?

Voters
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  • Yes, I would have no hesitation

    37 32.17%
  • No, I would opt for formula

    49 42.61%
  • I am not sure / undecided

    29 25.22%
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Thread: If you had no breastmilk, would you use a breastmilk bank?

  1. #19

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    Didn't Vanita end up donating some milk for Yvette?
    I would say yes if my baby was prem, probably not if I just had issues and the baby was full term.
    I would have no problems donating. I am a regular old milking machine, so no issues there.


  2. #20

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    I would use it both of mine where pre term babies and i choose to formula feed in the end.
    With Kimberley i was so sick and i couldn't get myself to b/f and with Alex i tried to express but i didn't have the right support to carry on and i had to hand express which really hurt me.
    So if this time round i have another premmie baby i will use it if i don't get the right help and support to get get my own milk going.

  3. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by *Michelle*
    With Kimberley i was so sick and i couldn't get myself to b/f and with Alex i tried to express but i didn't have the right support to carry on and i had to hand express which really hurt me.
    So if this time round i have another premmie baby i will use it if i don't get the right help and support to get get my own milk going.

    Michelle, I am so glad you can see it wasn't you who failed with BFing & it was the lack of support. Good on you!

  4. #22

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    I'm with you FJ, in all other aspects animals are seen to be the unhygenic ones, yet in this instance we prefer to feed our babies with milk that comes from an animal that wanders (in most cases) a paddock and eats grass? (BTW I love my dairy LOL)

    But yet we are quite happy for humans to prepare and serve us food, donate organs (I've seen plenty of discussions about organs and people are revolted at the idea of animal organ donations), sperm and egg donors, but not milk? That baffles me. Its almost like its thought of as a bodily fluid rather than a life source, if thats the case does it sound so good to know you drink another animals bodily fluid on a daily basis or that the cheese you eat in most cases (unless its vegetarian cheese) has curdled milk in it found from stomach of a calf? There's some really *gross* things about food out there, and alot of it is to do with food that doesn't ensure our babies have a better immunity but we eat it anyway. I think its sad that its a case of "what we don't know won't kill us" when in theory as we have seen in the past 20 yrs thanks to preservatives and trans fats etc that its simply the opposite!

    Just my thoughts

    *hugs*
    Cailin

  5. #23

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    The other thing that has me a little mmmmm not sure how to put it.. But many who have said they wouldn't use anothers BM but would happily donate their own.
    So why is that? Is your better then someone elses? (of course I mean someone else who would pass all the criteria to donate that is)

    I think one of the questions to be asked of a mother wanting to donate is, "would you use this service if you needed it?"

    In a way I think its a bit racist to not use it yet expect others to use yours KWIM? Maybe racist isn't the right word.....

  6. #24

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    I would definately use breastmilk that went through a screening process or from a family member or close friend even. I was debating it when I was trying to express milk to add the thickening agent to give to Matilda. I was trying to find someone around who was breastfeeding but the only one I did around me wasn't someone I "trusted" ykwim? I would have gladly taken a few frozen batches of EBM to keep her going while I was trying to build up my supply.

    I guess I just think of societies where it can be the normal for families to share in this responsibility.

    ETA Snap Fiona, maybe not racist but wary...

  7. #25

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    If I had the option, I would have used it for Zander as my milk just didn't come in I would have an issue with using a wet nurse though, because of the bonding that people talk about with breastfeeding, but with EBM, what's the difference to using cow's milk???

  8. #26

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    Or even Elitist?

    I think that some of the wariness in regards to another woman acutally BF your baby would have a lot to do with guilt issues from not being able to feed your baby yourself maybe? Like if I can't BF baby, then no-one else is? I just would like to know the 'why' is all, not to upset anyone.

    ETA - I myself think that would be the biggest issue for me, would be to see someone else with my baby at their breast.

  9. #27

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    LOL FJ I was just thinking that, I was thinking more egotistical rather than racist... because its as though my milk is perfectly fine for your baby but don't even think of giving your milk to mine its just not good enough LOL!

    And NO that is not what I am saying anyone is saying... JUST FOR THE RECORD... thats the way it sounds though... As I said I think its a mindset and I think as with any perception it can be changed we just need time! I know in some westernised countries its considered barbaric to BF your *own* baby still. We have come a long way we just need to come a bit more!

    And as I said I once thought the same way, I too thought it was gross (so if it sounds as though I am having a go I'd be having a go at myself too!) but then the points I mentioned were pointed out to me and I realised it was more the bonding act of bf'ing I was more adverse to than the milk itself. As I said when you stop thinking of it as anothers bodily fluid... it becomes easier to swallow (pun intended )

    I think this is a great step and hopefully by the time our grandkids are here the grossness associated will no longer be existant!

    ETA: Thanks Sherie ELITIST thats it! I was close LOL!

    *hugs*
    Cailin

  10. #28

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    Oh and here's some really TMI because I have to have a giggle - the prostaglandins they used to use for inductions come from.... take a guess... it's not human But it is semen. Think of what animal is said to be a close match to humans

    Other women don't feed at the breast it's donated milk
    Last edited by Rouge; August 31st, 2006 at 08:57 AM.
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children
    Author of Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know
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    Forever grateful to my incredible Mod Team and many wonderful members who have been so supportive since 2003.

  11. #29

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    LOL Kel I know that I was just saying I realised that was what bothered me

    *hugs*
    Cailin

  12. #30

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    Wow!! You learn something new every day!

  13. #31

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    My sister is pg, due in about 3 weeks. I would feed her baby at the breast or with EBM, which ever she was comfortable with. But I wouldn't let her do the same for me. Not because I am better then her but because she smokes/drinks etc. Now if Fire Fly (Kerrie) offered EMB for my baby if I was in need I would happily use it. Because she doesn't smoke/drink etc.

    ETA: I knew racist was not the right word but couldn't think of wat was.

  14. #32

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    LOL Kelly, I think if you nit-picked at the ingredients for a lot of common items, we would be totally grossed out.

    ETA

    Originally posted by FionaJill
    But I wouldn't let her do the same for me. Not because I am better then her but because she smokes/drinks etc.
    That is another consideration. There a many people who are excluded form donating blood for many different reasons, so would your lifestyle prevent you form donating BM at all, or would the screening and pasturisation process eliminate those issues?

  15. #33
    Debbie Lee Guest

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    I think maybe some people feel a bit funny about the idea of someone elses milk because for years now we've had the whole "sharing bodily fluids spreads HIV/AIDS and other diseases" rammed down our throats for years.
    EVEN though there's a thorough screening process etc. I imagine it's hard for some people to get around the idea of feeding their baby something that has come from another human being. The whole "other species" debate probably doesn't worry people because a) we drink cow's milk anyway so it's seen as "normal" and b) formula comes in powder form and it's easy not to think about where it has come from.
    I'm not arguing against BM banks at all... just trying to explain why people might have issues and feel "disgusted" by the idea. As it is, there are plenty of women who don't even give breastfeeding a go at all because they see the concept as being really "gross". It's all got to to with how our society has kind of turned really artificial. I don't think the women themselves can be blamed when we have the "artificial options" thrown in our face all the time!
    Also, how many times have you seen/heard people baulk at the idea of someone breastfeeding past 12 months?? People just don't GET the benefits of breastmilk. They honestly believe that there's something wrong with women that want to BF until the baby decides to wean.
    It may not be right, but it'll take a lot of time and education to change people's minds on the issue!
    I voted "not sure" because I still feel a bit "ick" about the idea of taking milk donated by a stranger but I still think it would be a better idea than formula.

  16. #34

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    I was just checking I wasn't sure ROFL

    ps. It's pig!
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children
    Author of Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know
    Follow me in 2015 as I go Around The World + Kids!
    Forever grateful to my incredible Mod Team and many wonderful members who have been so supportive since 2003.

  17. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sherie
    That is another consideration. There a many people who are excluded form donating blood for many different reasons, so would your lifestyle prevent you form donating BM at all, or would the screening and pasturisation process eliminate those issues?
    From the website

    Our ideal donor is a mother in the early stages of lactation who has fully established her own milk supply and is producing more milk than her baby requires. However, all milk is valuable and we will accept donations from mothers’ breastfeeding infants up to 12 months old. Changes to milk composition after this time mean it may be unsuitable for the adequate nutrition of very ill or premature babies.

    Although your milk is ideal for your own baby we need to take extra care when feeding tiny or sick babies. We cannot accept milk from mothers who smoke, use illegal drugs, or have illnesses that may be passed on through the milk.


    You MAY not be able to donate milk if you:

    • Have been told you cannot give blood for a medical reason
    • Smoke or use tobacco products (including patches and gum)
    • Have lived in or travelled to Europe between 1980 and 1996 and stayed for more than 6 months
    • Have a chronic health condition such as HIV, Hepatitis or a history of cancer
    • Have injected yourself with drugs not prescribes by a doctor
    • Regularly consume more than 2 standard alcoholic drinks per day
    • Regularly consume more than 750ml of caffeinated drinks per day


    You MAY not be able to donate if in the last 12 months you:

    • Had intimate contact with someone at risk for AIDS or HIV, including haemophiliacs and IV drug users
    • Had a blood transfusion, blood products, organ or tissue transplant
    • Had ear or body piercing, a tattoo or permanent make-up
    • Had an accidental needle stick injury
    • Received a vaccine for Hepatitis A or B
    I think the MAY not be able to donatething is just covering there backs. There are so many htings you can't say these days without offending someone. So I think if you still enquired about donating & could answer YES to any of the questions then you would not be accepted.
    Last edited by *Efjay*; August 31st, 2006 at 09:22 AM.

  18. #36

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    Milk Processing

    In addition to thoroughly screening our donors we pasteurise all donor milk before it is fed to babies.

    This heat treatment has been shown to kill any bacteria that may be present in the milk and ensures that no diseases are passed through the milk.

    As a further safety measure all milk is tested both before and after treatment to ensure all bacteria have been killed.

    An unavoidable side effect of heat treating human milk is damage to some of the bioactive components in the milk that are beneficial to preterm infants who have very immature immune systems and are therefore susceptible to infection and illness.

    The pasteurisation system that we have developed meets international standards, however we are able to rapidly heat and cool milk during heat treatment. This results in minimal damage to the beneficial components in breastmilk while maintaining safety.

    We are also researching (in collaboration with The University of Western Australia) other methods with hope of further reducing damage to milk protein.

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