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Thread: Gentle parenting and Vaccination

  1. #37

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    My gf didn't have her twin daughters vaccinated until they were 2 and they had each vaccination separately. I think her concern was for a reaction, rather than a gentle parenting issue. Although for her new baby she's having him done as per the program, so I'm not sure where her thoughts are now!

    I had Lucy done and will keep having her vaccinated by the book. Like Chloe, I think there's a social issue here, as well as a personal one. I would hate for my daughter when she is older to contract one of the diseases she hadn't been vaccinated for and pass it on to someone who was vulnerable, like a small baby or a pregnant woman.



    As for the needles, having had bad chicken pox and the mumps as a teenager I can personally guarantee a needle is a lot less painful and easier to get over!

  2. #38

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    Re the mercury; there is still mercury in australian vaccines, called 'thimerosal', but it has been reduced to what are considered 'safe' levels; ie 1 part per million, or similar. However I did read somewhere that it is a concern if the baby is getting multiple injections at the same time, and thereby increasing their mercury input. I think the MMR vacc has the highest level.

  3. #39

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    I really don't want to get into a debate about this subject so I'll say no more after this.

    Very few Australian vaccines contain thimerosal, and all which do have very small levels. The MMR vaccine has never contained thimerosal as it is a live vaccine and the presence of a preservative like thimerosal would render it inactive. If you are worried about thimerosal it is possible to request from your doctor a list of all vaccines which contain it and about preservative-free alternatives.

  4. #40

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    I also don't want to turn this into an argument. But Eugenia is right about the mercury. I think the last one to have mercury in Aus was the birth hep B (bcos the subsequent hep b ones are combined they didn't have it) but now there is a mercury free one which is the one most commonly used. You can check with the hospital to make sure this is the one they use. The common issue with MMR is that it is combined but not because of mercury. There is a theory that the combined vaccination can cause autism but again it is very hard to know from the research whether this is founded or not. Overseas you can get them separately if you are worried (it costs more) but I think it is difficult to do that here.

    It has to be a personal decision but you should take care that your info is from a reputable source. There is a lot of propoganda out there both ways. Don't ask me how to get the truth from it, I'm still trying to figure that out myself!! The only bit of info I am totally confident of is about mercury in Aus vaccines as above.

    Good luck!!!

    Melanie

  5. #41

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    Laura, the booster tetanus is just that, a booster. When my Mum was bitten by a dog a few years ago she had to have a few tetanus shots over the next couple of months 'cause she hadn't been immunised for so long. If she was up to date she wouldn't have had to have any, and if she'd had one within the last ten years she'd only have had to have a booster. I think!

  6. #42

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    Hi, we opted to vaccinate our daughter, there was never a question whether or not to vaccinate. However for some of the vaccinations we did decide to wait until she was older and had a more mature antibody system. Therefor instead of having needles every 2 to 4 mths she only had to have 1 dose. She ended up contracting chicken pox the day before she was booked in to have her vaccination for it. I had no contact with anyone who had it, so she must of just passed a sneezing child somewhere, just goes to show how contagious some things are.

    Goodluck making a decision, when it comes down to it, if you are doing it with all intentions for the best interest of your child either way, then it is the right decision.

    Love

  7. #43

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    I just wanted to add something else - yesterday afternoon I got a call telling me that a baby at Jack's day care has Menningicoccal. Apparently it isn't that easy to catch and Jack wasn't closely exposed to the child, but nevertheless I feel very relieved that I had him vaccinated against Menningicoccal C. The call scared the sh** out of me I have to say!

    I still respect everyone's individual decision and still think it's impossible to know what the right thing to do is, but maybe for those who are undecided another option is to get some but not all the vaccinations?? just a thought. I just wonder how I would have felt when I got the call if he hadn't been vaccinated.

    BTW for those who are interested, the health dept guy who I asked numerous questions of said that the menn C vaccination is effective in preventing menningicoccal c in 19/20 kids (so isn't 100%). And the only two strains of menningicoccal that are usually seen in Aus are B and C and there is no vaccine for B. However B is usually (but not always) less severe than C. They don't yet know what strain this baby has.

    My thoughts are with that poor mum....

  8. #44

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    Poor mum, hope her little one gets better sooner rather than later.

    Love

  9. #45

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    We didnt get DS vaccinated against hep b at birth, as my thoughts were the same as Kellys. We have just had DS 12 Month vaccination done. 4 months late, due to me feeling uncomfortable and unsure about having them done. We have decided to hold off on the MMR at this point but he has had all others. I will probably get the MMR done Separately when he is around 4 y.o. I think I may look into the naturopath vaccines for them after reading this thread.

    Just want to add, that i have heard that Meningacoccal C is not that common, it is the other strains of Meningacoccal that are more common, but there is no vaccine for them????

  10. #46

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    Ally, the health dept guy told me that the two most common strains in Aus are B and C (in fact the others are very rare here). There is no vaccine for B but it is usually (not always) less severe than strain C.

  11. #47

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    Since having DS recently vaccinated against everything but MMR, a few days ago, I am still totally confused as to wether we should have had it done or not. I am tearing my hair out in frustration not knowing what is best for my son. (The Autism risk scares me the most)
    if I decided to get DS vaccinated against MMR, he can still get Measles, Mumps and Rubella , just on a lesser scale than if he wasnt vaccinated, right? Or could he still get it terribly bad even vaccinated?
    I had rubella vaccination at 15 at school, and it was only given to the girls, (by 25 my immunity was zero, so had to have another one b4 ttc.) If it was given to girls only back then, why is it neccessary to have boys done now? Is it just because they have put it all in the one shot which is more convenient?
    If and when i decide to get DS vaccinated for MMR, I want him to have them separately. Is this possible in Australia? Will all Docs do it.
    BTW, when DH discussed the MMR vaccine with his Doc and told him we have decided to hold off on that one, his doc replied with "I dont want to comment, but good decision"
    How common is Measles, Mumps and Rubella these days anyway?
    I dont know, I am just so confused, where do you get unbiased truths to this matter....

  12. #48

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    ally if you want MMR seperatly you have to get from england as australia does not have it here. my dr does not recommend it either.
    good luck with your decision but know you are not alone with your concerns, oscar is not immunised and will not be getting mmr ever. ps i had measles mumps and rubella as a child ans survived as did the majority of kids!
    beckles

  13. #49

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    Thanks Beckles and Fruitwood, and Laura too, for your good advice. I am definitely leaning towards NOT getting it done. This is what i feel is best for my child, esp since hearing it from a Dr. And Beckles, I am sure with your knowlege and experience, you would have a better idea than most.

    Thank you for your replies.

  14. #50

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    No damage here from having measles mumps and rubella as a child!!!

    Jo

  15. #51

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    I don't think anyone I know had damage from measles and mumps, but then some people did and there are obviously reasons there are vaccines. Personally for me my number one reason for vaccinating is fear for if I don't and my babies get sick. i don't think I could live with it. Maybe they'd be ok, but I couldn'[t risk it. My friends baby had pneumoccocal when she was 6 months and the ONLY reason she lived is becuase she'd had the first part of the immunisation. It was the most horrific time for them and they are just so lucky. I was happy with all my vaccine decisions after that.
    Also DD1 who is 8 actually came to me last month and said even though she hates needles, she really really wanted the chicken pox vaccine. So.. we got it. I was going to not bother, but she heard about it and made the decision herself. Again I felt glad I had done the other vaccines as she's obviously concerned about being sick. Im glad I've done my best to protect them.
    The second reason is that I feel it's my responsibility to do it for the wider community. Its meant to be there so everyone does it and we illiminate disease and basically I think what makes me so special that I should be the one who won't conform. Just my opinion xo

  16. #52

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    Meg well done on your decision, re elimination of the disease are you aware that even though cow pox immunisation was given to 'eliminate' the disease that in all countrys even ones that had no immunisation the disease died out. hence there is a school of thought that suggests that these diseases go along their own path and eliminate regardless of immunisation and that immunisation actually keeps the disease 'alive' and active longer. just thought you might like another's point of view.
    with respect though, totally to your decision.
    beckles

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