Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: SPD (Pelvic Instability) and Relaxin and General Question About Hormonal Imbalances

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Recently treechanged to Woodend, VIC
    Posts
    3,473

    Default SPD (Pelvic Instability) and Relaxin and General Question About Hormonal Imbalances

    Brief recap: I had pelvic instability (SPD) in my first pregnancy and suffered quite badly for six months after the birth and less severely between then and now (19 months later) so I am understandably scared about TTC but have to get on with it because of my age.

    Anyhow, I am doing clinical pilates to try to improve my core strength BUT, this is what I'm wondering.

    SPD is caused by the hormone relax loosening up the pelvis to make it easier for the baby to come out. Why aren't there any treatments out there aimed at reducing/moderating the amount of relaxin produced?

    Now I'm the first to admit that I'm a medical neanderthal but how are other hormonal imbalances treated? Presumably pills? Or can acupuncture be helpful?


  2. #2

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    4,081

    Default

    Hey Fiona. Maybe it could be a good idea to get a referral to an endocrinologist?
    I think relaxin has many roles both during pregnancy and otherwise: not only to relax the ligaments of the pelvis. It's also a vasodilator and therefore affects bloodflow, blood pressure and kidney function.
    I am sure there would be medication to regulate this hormone, (I think there is relaxin treatment available which increases the level of it in the body for cardiac problems, but not sure about decreasing the levels) but not sure if that would 'fix' the issue anyway? Haven't done much reading, but I'm sure there'd be stuff for you to investigate online.
    As for natural therapies, I have no doubt there'd be something your naturopath could recommend to try to regulate hormones, but I've no idea how effective it may be.
    Best thing would be to talk to someone who knows hormones.

  3. #3
    Chook83 Guest

    Default

    Hi Fiona, I believe i am suffering with SPD. Am thinking about seeing a physio and am hoping you can give me some information that helped you if any?

  4. #4

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    camden, NSW
    Posts
    52

    Default

    I had SPD with DD2 (now 2 weeks old) i found that for some reason my pain all but disapeared at around 37 weeks. I didnt do anything differently, just one day i woke up feeling great. I ended up have DD2 2 weeks early so i believe that the labour hormones had kicked in and had taken over the Relaxin hormones, I know this doesnt help at all but i also found that i had no SPD pain while i was in labour which i was really worried about becasue at times i could barely walk.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    4,081

    Default

    Hey Chook, go see that physio! Don't hang around waiting for the pain to get worse. They can give you a (very attractive ) brace to wear that should help you feel more 'held-together'. They will also give your supporting muscles a going-over (massage) and will make you feel better. (Unless your physio is like mine and pummels your bum so hard you bruise, LOL! But my problem is with the SIJ, not my pubic symphysis.)

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Paradise
    Posts
    4,473

    Default

    Fiona - it is a matter of working out the correct level of the hormone for you too, because if they don't give you enough it will cause problems with the birth. Unfortunately chances are you will get it the second time and it is likely to hit earlier, so make sure you have support networks set up, someone to come over every day or every 2 days and help with the washing and cleaning. Acupuncture can help, if you have cover for it then get it. I would be having it if we had PHI, my MW said to try and get PHI asap if we can so that I can have induction AP too

    Chook - Definitely go to the physio. If they can't do much they will do what they can. Some hospitals will use ultrasound to help before bubs has engaged, others won't. With DD2 I had the US, but the hospital I am going to now refuses to use US on PG women for anything other than imaging.

  7. #7
    DoubleK Guest

    Default

    i recently saw a chiro for pain in my pelvis (which i believe is SPD) he did an adjustment, the pain went, but i was still uncomfortable and a little unstable on my feet. its been 4 days, and still no pain, but discomfort.
    he basically said to me that while im pregnant, there isnt much chance of my adjustments lasting, so he only recommends one more until after ive had the bub. i dont know anything about acupuncture, but it wouldnt hurt to look into it!

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    On the other side of this screen!!!
    Posts
    11,129

    Default

    Fiona - well I like your train of thought...the most powerful all-round-system-balancing therapies I know of are the Trad Chinese Medicine +/- acupuncture - I think either or both of those in combination could be quite valuable...it might be interesting to speak to a TCM practitioner and find out what they have to say about it. If they've never heard of SPD/pelvic instability then run a mile, but if they experience with it, they could have some valuable therapies, kwim?

    Good luck - you can do it! You will be so much better prepared this time. xxx

  9. #9
    Chook83 Guest

    Default

    Snacks and Ali - thanks i will start looking for a physio now and make that appointment.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Recently treechanged to Woodend, VIC
    Posts
    3,473

    Default

    Chook - DO make an appointment with a physio and have a look at this information from the Pelvic Instability Support Association here Home If you google pelvic instability you'll find more information too.

    As far as the relaxin thing goes, I asked my physio about this today and she says that she doesn't think it's "too much" relaxin that's the problem it's just that different women's bodies react differently to the same amount. She said that SPD was particularly a problem for women who are very flexible (and promptly showed me how bendy her elbow is as she's suffered from it too). I think there's something in that as I am generally quite flexible. She also said that pale skin/Scandinavian background seems to be a common denominator too.

    So ... not sure where that leaves my initial theory but hey, I've been pain-free for a whole week now so woohoo for that!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •