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Thread: Babies cry more in yellow rooms??

  1. #1

    Cool Babies cry more in yellow rooms??

    I was talking to my sister yesterday telling her we'd been out to buy paint for the new baby's room and she asked what colour. I said a very gender neutral yellow

    Then she tells me I shouldn't have picked yellow because studies into colour and mood have shown that babies cry more in yellow rooms

    I googled it and a whole heap of stuff popped up so she isn't making it up. Anyone had a yellow nursery and find their baby didn't cry all day??



    I know it's dumb but i'm seriously considering getting a different colour, even though that means I've just wasted $50 on paint we'll never use.

  2. #2

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    hi willow!
    We used i think it was called harvested corn yellow, so it wasnt a light yellow and we had it as a feature was which bubs faced in her cot, and to be honest she hardly cried at all, and i'd happily use yellow in a nursery again!
    HTH
    skye
    xxx

  3. #3

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    *shrug* If it's a problem, you can always hang some material along the walls, like those sheer organza curtains you can get fairly cheaply from Spotlight. Even if there's something in it, I doubt it'll be the difference between a silent baby and a colicky baby.

  4. #4

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    Thanks Skye. I've used yellow in both of our other nurseries but we had other colours too (each wall a different pastel colour because we never find out the gender of our babies). This time we want one colour because eventually this room will be used again for our spare bedroom and we don't want to have to repaint it.

  5. #5

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    Sorry, I don't have any advise , but am now quite curious as I have also painted the nursery a cheery yellow!

  6. #6

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    Wow Ive never heard of that!!! Our nursery is standard rental cream....I wonder if the landlord will repaint for me lol yea right!!

  7. #7

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    I have heard of this theory. A gp actually told me. At the time we painted DD room green instead. Since then we have a new house I actually painted all the rooms yellow...oopps. Although Loren has been in a yellow room and we had no probs

  8. #8

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    I've heard this... my aunt and uncle had twins and their ante natal educator talked about this, right after they had painted the nursery yellow

    And my cousins were pretty feral

  9. #9

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    Bek, I'm wishing we'd gone for green too now! Easy to add either blue or pink to it after bub is born and it would still look nice. Bah!

    Wonder if I could mix the yellow with a blue to get green hmmm...could always try a small sample and see what happens!

  10. #10

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    Well, there could be something in it, as colours can certainly affect the feel of a room. maybe yellow is quite a stimulating colour?

    I spose you can take comfort in knowing it doesn't make any difference for night sleeps, coz you can't see anything in the dark! LOL.

  11. #11

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    I don't know how they worked this out, most likely they had a control group of say 100 babies and cause yellow is quite a popular colour for babies room...and all babies cry....so probably a majority of the babies had yellow rooms, and surprise...cry! LOL

    And I was under the impression for the first month or so babies can only see black/white/grey so how does that work?

    Were in a rental and babies room is a pale yellow, but we have blockout curtains so the room is only obviously yellow when you put the light on...

    I really wouldn't worry about it!! Worst that can happen, if you think its affecting bubs that much, paint it! GL

  12. #12

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    I hadn't heard this but I'd imagine it relates to a strong canary yellow- which you are unlikely to use anyway!
    In DS's room, we wanted unisex colours, so we have 2 walls painted in a soft yellow (Dulux 'Daisy Mews'). The other 2 walls are painted in a soft mint green (Dulux 'Pixie Mint') in a half tint. I have heard that green is supposed to be a calming colour. Its my favorite room in the house- very warm and friendly. I love it and DS loves his room too.
    And nope- he doesn't cry all day!!! He always wakes up happy and babbles to himself.
    Sounds a bit silly to me......

    X

  13. #13

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    I don't think it sounds silly. If you can say that green is a calming colour, then yellow could well be a stimulating colour. Just like orange is warming and blue is cooling. I'm sure we'd all feel happier in a coloured room than a grey room.

    I'd be interested to see if there is actually any research on this kind of thing.. I reckon interior decorators would know. And people that design offices and things to optimise work performance etc etc.

    I guess a blanket statement that babies will cry more in a yellow room is a bit silly, but there could be something in it.

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    I remember watching something about the effect of colours on our everday lives. Oranges are good for dining rooms as they encourage eating, purple for bedrooms etc. The college I went to for Yrs 11 & 12 was new and painted in greys and pinks, something to do with helping as study. A large workplace I was at had a lot of citrus colours, in lemons and limes. The whole design of the building was meant to be cutting edge with productivity in the workplace.

  15. #15
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    Babies and adults respond differently to colour. The most calming colour for a newborn is red, presumably because up until birth it was the only colour they ever saw (when light came though the belly - think closing your eyes and turning our face to the sun). If i were you i'd get one of those over-the-cot rails to hang an organza curtain from (think princess style bed, you know what i mean?) and buy a bunch of red linen or organza to hang from it so you can enclose the cot in it when it's sleepy/nap time. Or you could make a red linen ring sling like mine If you DID use a rail for a curtain you could also experiment with different colours to see what bubs likes best.

    Bx

  16. #16

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    Interesting!

    Color Meaning, Color Psychology & Color Therapy:

    Warm Colors

    Found on the red side of the color wheel, warm colors have a tendency to communicate warmth, intimacy and relaxation. These colors seem to advance closer to the viewer creating a sense of closeness and comfort. However, intense warm colors such as reds and oranges tend to stimulate and excite the viewer.If your child is warm and affectionate herself and if she loves to read or just relax in her room, you may consider suggesting she base her kid room colors on something from the red side of the color wheel.

    Cool Colors

    Found on the blue side of the color wheel, cool colors have a calming affect although intensely cool colors (very dark) have a tendency to depress the viewer. Cool colors tend to draw away from the viewer, which is likely why some respond to cool colors with a sense of coolness and reserve. Painting kid rooms, light cool colors such as blue green, light blue, blue-violet and even white have a calming effect and make rooms feel more spacious and elegant.

    Earth Tones

    Ground colors like grays, browns, and beige (muted yellows) ground you. They are a good choice for hyperactive children, creating a sense of warmth, comfort and relaxation.

    Muted ground colors are best. Just look outside for examples of the browns and grays found in squirrels, trees, and the earth. (Since I’m from Prince Edward Island, Canada the rusty red color found in the soil has a grounding effect for me but it may not produce the same reaction for those in other areas of the world.)

    Black

    Black is best used sparingly if at all. Traditionally it represents darkness, despair, sorrow and mourning and subconsciously it is strongly associated with death. When it is used in large amounts it absorbs light and it can generate depression and/or zap the energy out of the viewer.

    While discussing painting kid rooms, teens often mention black as a color choice. (I know my teenager and his friends did.) For them it’s creates a sense of mystery and modern style. The style they want to communicate can still be reached using black in restricted amounts, as accents or accessories. That said, black should not be used in large amounts, especially in rooms that are used frequently.

    White

    White predominately represents peace, faith, joy, cleanliness and of course, purity. Since it reflects almost 80% of light, white rooms seem brighter and larger than rooms painted in other colors. However, if you’re painting kid rooms predominately white, have lots of stain remover on hand. White is also a great anchor color that can be enhanced with other fun kid room colors.

    Red

    If you’re looking to create a sense of peace when finished painting kid rooms, you may not get it if you choose to use large amounts of red in the room. While reds can create a sense of warmth, they also stimulate and energize the viewer. The brightest of reds can increase desire, excitability and are associated with danger, passion, anger and tension. Used to counterbalance neutral colors, it can add life and sparkle in a kid room.

    Orange

    Yes, it has some of the same effects as red but to a lesser degree as it combines the energy of red with the happiness of yellow. Brownish oranges create warm, cozy vibes while brighter oranges are fun and lively, and a good choice for play rooms. The brightest of oranges are non-relaxing while softer oranges are warm, welcoming, satisfying and add energy to the room.

    Green

    Said to reinforce self-esteem and suggest hope, restfulness and calmness, green is a refreshing color that makes dim rooms seem more vibrant as long as it’s not too dark.

    Use it on its own or to create a sense of relief as you counterbalance it with hot colors like red and orange.

    Blue

    Blue often signifies harmony, loyalty, peace, depth of feeling, sensitivity, wisdom, confidence and stability. It’s a great bedroom color as it slows the human nervous system and produces a calming effect that prepares the body to nod off to sleep.
    It can soften bright rooms, making one feel comforted and at peace. On the other hand, certain blues can make the viewer feel cold. Blues that are too dark have the same effect as black.

    Purple

    Combining the stability of blue and the energy of red, violet can take on the characteristics of blue or red depending on the shade. Often it’s considered a risky, powerful color as the feelings it evokes depend on the shade. Traditionally it signifies royalty, power, justice, nobility and luxury yet it is also associated with depression and suffering. Dark purple can evoke feelings of sadness and frustration while lighter purples can make the viewer feel peaceful, romantic and nostalgic. Light purple is a good choice for feminine kid rooms.

    Yellow

    Stimulates, energizes and is sunny and cheerful. Pale yellows make rooms seem larger while stronger yellows create warmth and brighten dim rooms. If overused it may be disturbing to the viewer. It tends to grab attention and stimulate muscle activity.
    When a baby is born he sees only black, white and gray. Within a week or so he can see red and begins to reach out to the color as it helps him develop his perception skills. Since children see red before blue it’s best to decorate a baby room using soft tones instead of bright primary colors as they may confuse his sensory skills and overwhelm him. As a result, kid room paint colors and the particular colors to paint a room should be well thought out prior to giving birth.

    For many, the brightest of reds for example, may represent a loud, unsettling color that makes focusing on a task difficult, for others it could provide a sense of comfort and security since they relate it to a favorite stuffed friend or blanket. So no matter what our age, we relate to colors based on personal experiences and interests.

    Kid room paint colors in general and deciding on what colors to paint a room need not be overwhelming. All that's required is a little forethought and some fundamental knowledge from which to base your kid room colors on.

    The youngest of children aren’t yet affected by the cultural influences of color. Even though adults have had more experiences with color, we may not all respond the same. For example, for many in the world white represents purity but in Japan it represents mourning and death.

  17. #17

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    double post!

  18. #18

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    Still thinking about the green! haha. Wish I'd read all this LAST week!

    The yellow we've chosen isn't pale, pale, but not canary either...dunno. Will think about it some more.

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