Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 37 to 54 of 72

Thread: Alcohol and teenagers what would you/do you do?

  1. #37

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    In my own private paradise
    Posts
    15,272

    Default

    personally, i like the taste. there are some drinks that i like that you just can't recreate without alcohol (would happily switch from alcoholic to non-alcoholic if i could get the same taste)



    yes, atm, i have been enjoying a half shot of vodka in blood orange soft drink - it's nothing exciting, but i'm enjoying it. but normally i would have something like a fruit tingle and i just don't know how to recreate that flavour without the blue curacao!

    i know for a lot of people it is like you said, a way to relax. i think for some, it's a way of forcing themselves to take time out and just "be" and enjoy the moment with a glass of red (can't imagine anything worse to be honest lol)

  2. #38

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    A Nestle Free Zone... What about YOU?
    Posts
    5,374

    Default

    I can understand the taste thing. (I don't generally drink spirits - though I did have a "****tail" night around Christmas time).
    It's also a very social thing in Australia (& many other cultures).
    I meditate for my "just be" time... I guess that wouldn't quite taste the same as a ****tail!

  3. #39

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Funky Town, Vic
    Posts
    7,070

    Default

    cos everything is funnier when you drink Deb.

    And I can't see anything wrong with that. Man has always found ways of altering minds and chasing a high, way before the day some dude licked a toad and saw god.

    Everything in moderation - if you find the ONLY way of relaxing is to drink that isn't fabulous, but not everyone drinks for only that reason.

  4. #40

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    A Nestle Free Zone... What about YOU?
    Posts
    5,374

    Default

    That's true (that not everyone only relaxes with a drink) & sometimes things are funnier when you drink.

  5. #41

    Default

    I've heard pretty much every reason under the sun for drinking Inanna. Here are some Ive heard from clients over the years...

    To fit in
    It's cool
    My parents said I can't
    My parents and siblings do, so why can't I?
    To relax when I'm at a party
    To escape from reality
    Because I can't stop
    Because I like it
    Because the pixie told me too (seriously!)
    because it's safer than drugs

    Why do I drink? I like the taste. I don't drink a heck of a lot. When I do, it's usually one or two glasses. I might get blindingly drunk half a dozen times a year at most. With a young child, I need to be in top form so I just don't drink much. Plus they're empty calories and whenever I have a drink, I seem to get sprung by my trainer who just makes me work ten times harder in my next session!

  6. #42

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    A Nestle Free Zone... What about YOU?
    Posts
    5,374

    Default

    I've heard that too (apart from the pixies MG! )

    However back to Lulu - I know that things are funnier sometimes (trust me I'm one of them I like a drink as I've prelisted) but sometimes things are not funny. People have sex, have car accidents yadda yadda. YET we accept it as being okay as a drug... I'm thinking aloud and this is typed as the thoughts come so please don't feel judged as I DRINK too! Just that I've made a conscious decision over the past year to not abuse alcohol to the point of drunkenness... (my personal decision not one I feel should be inflicted on anyone else!)

  7. #43

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Inanna View Post
    People have sex, have car accidents yadda yadda.
    This is where (from a professional and personal point of view) education about harm minimisation comes into play. Educating people about the risks of alcohol consumption (both in moderate and excessive amounts) and encouraging them to be in a safe environment, with people they trust. Ideally, we want there to be someone (at least one person) who is not substance effected and who will know how (and will) deal with any situations that arise.

    For young girls, this is having a friend who NEVER lets you go off with someone alone when you've been drinking. For the general populas, it is having a designated driver. It's about educating people to never leave a drink unattended and to always watch it being poured to reduce the risks of drugging.

    THIS is why if my DD tells me that she wants to drink, I will encourage it to be in my own home until such time that I can be sure she will be responsible (even under the peer pressure of her friends) or she hits 18 when I really can't stop her (but believe me, I'd try!).

  8. #44

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Funky Town, Vic
    Posts
    7,070

    Default

    I love drunk sex, so I don't see it as a problem , I understand what you mean but you are coming at it from a different angle that I am. Drinking doesn't cause car accidents. Drunk people choosing to drive do.

  9. #45

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    A Nestle Free Zone... What about YOU?
    Posts
    5,374

    Default

    That's true... I am not sure what angle I'm coming from as I'm thinking aloud... So good on you if you know where I"m coming from - let me know!!!

  10. #46

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Funky Town, Vic
    Posts
    7,070

    Default

    I dunno, it seems like you are taking the person out of the situation iykwim? All alcohol/drug consumption does not lead to broken hearts is my theme...

  11. #47

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    In my own private paradise
    Posts
    15,272

    Default

    i think i'm with you MG - harm minimisation seems to be where my thoughts are (not that they're clear)

    i've been the responsible one in many situations and i honestly don't mind. i'd PREFER to know that i have a clear head - i don't know if it's a control freak thing, but i just can't put my trust in anyone else to be responsible like that. i've been around a bunch of underaged teens - they were drinking at a friends place (with her son) - she asked DH and I to be there as there were more teens there than she could honestly be responsible for. as soon as ONE kid gatecrashed, she closed the whole thing down. i was impressed. DH and I took each of the teens home early and made sure they went inside. they might have gone off and met up again, but we did all we could to make sure they got home safely...

  12. #48

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    A Nestle Free Zone... What about YOU?
    Posts
    5,374

    Default

    I too agree with harm minimisation & like you BG my thoughts are not too clear....

    As for taking the people out of it - well I guess that could be one way of seeing it. I just am pondering that we have a culture built around alcohol being a pivotal ingredient in many social occassions. Then we wonder why alcohol kills so many. When so many kids see drinking as normal. I drink heaps of water & carry a bottle with me everywhere. So do my kids. I bake not buy - my kids think that's normal. I dom't use plastic - my kids see it as normal. If I drink every Friday night they then think that's normal... Do you see what I mean?

    I am just curious at (society) how we see (society) alcohol as the dangerous drug its proven to be yet we are normalising it's use to our kids... It's just a thought. Not a decision or an opinion - me thinking and pondering.

  13. #49

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Funky Town, Vic
    Posts
    7,070

    Default

    It's completely normalised in my family. I do have a drink nearly every Friday night. My parents had a ****tail after work and told each other about their day. I sometimes brought my dad a beer when he was working in the garden. I can't see the problem here. I think you do because you had an alcoholic parent.

  14. #50

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    A Nestle Free Zone... What about YOU?
    Posts
    5,374

    Default

    Whoa hold off I am not sying I see a problem with it I am just pondering as I said that we have a society that is very very "Normal" & okay with alcohol consumption being a regular & a "norm" at social functions yet it's on the other hand we recognise it as such an issue & lament on how to protect our kids.

    Having an alcoholic parent showed me how addictive it can be (my father is a very high functioning alco) but it doesn't stop me partaking.

    I was just pondering & thinking aloud at the disparity we (society) hold in our thoughts. On one hand we accept it as normal & on the other we then try and keepour kids away from it as long as possible...

  15. #51

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Geelong
    Posts
    3,438

    Default

    Alcoholism is a generational curse on DH's side of the family and I'm hoping and praying that it can be broken with our children. I know that one day our children will experiment with alcohol, it just scares the crap out of me to see whether they can actually control their drinking. This is why for us educating them and being open with them, explaining to them how it can ruin lives and families. My family were the complete opposite, mum never drank and I only ever saw my dad drink a shandy when it was hot.

    Regards,
    Dianne

  16. #52

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Funky Town, Vic
    Posts
    7,070

    Default

    yes Deb, it is normal in my house and I keep my children away from it until they have the maturity to handle it themselves.

  17. #53

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    A Nestle Free Zone... What about YOU?
    Posts
    5,374

    Default

    Dianne you might already know this but at major tertiary hospitals there are often groups for children of alcoholic families to have education. These can be really great for kids as when it's another adult (not mum or dad!) educating it is often heard differently by kids.
    I understand your worries - I think many parents share your concerns & it is impacted when alcohol has become an addiction to some family members. Big hugs

  18. #54

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Geelong
    Posts
    3,438

    Default

    Thank you Inanna, I didn't know about these groups. It's actually a great comfort knowing that there is this sort of help out there and that it is acknowledged in such a way.

    Regards,
    Dianne

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •