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Thread: Artifical Sweetners?

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Default Artifical Sweetners?

    Does anyone know the go on artifical sweeters and their affect on pg.



    For instance, equal sugar substitute, artifical sweetners used in low joule drinks and cordials and other low joule products that use them as well.

    Thanks in advance
    Odette
    Mum to Ariel and Immogen - 5/12/2002 TWINS
    1 emby on board

  2. #2

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    I was advise not to use any, not that I did beore pg anyway, particularly aspartame/equal/nutrasweet (they're all aspartame).

    The ones that are based on sugar, like Splenda, are OK.

  3. #3

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    There has been a lot of medical research into this and a lot of conflicitng advice - I read Dr Karl Kruzelnitski (sp????) on this and he reckons that all the blather about artificial sweetners causing cancer is rubbish. I tend to think of it like everything else - two kilos of salt in one go will kill you - but that doesn't mean you can't take a shake of salt on your chips - two kilos of artificial sweener in one go may cause cancer in rats, but are you really going to ingest 2kg of artificial sweetner in one go?

    I still drink diet softdrinks - I just keep it to 600ml a day.

  4. #4

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    Don't know if people are still interested in this topic, but I discovered this on the Canadian Health Dept website on food safety in pregnancy http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/nutriti...les-06g_e.html

    Aspartame is a dipeptide containing the amino acids phenylalanine and aspartic acid. The acceptable daily intake of aspartame is 40 mg/kg body weight/day, which is equivalent to a person weighing 60 kg drinking approximately sixteen 355 mL (10 oz.) cans of diet soft drink daily (2). Individuals needing to control phenylalanine intake (i.e., phenylketonuria), should limit their aspartame intake (1).

    Evidence suggests that consumption of aspartame by pregnant women is safe and does not pose a health hazard. However pregnant women should be cautioned against excessive consumption of products containing aspartame and other artificial sweeteners since such foods could be replacing nutrient-dense, energy-yielding foods

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