Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 37 to 49 of 49

Thread: If money wasnt an issue

  1. #37

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Rural NSW
    Posts
    7,100

    Default

    I have to "second" that. My DD has attended Anglican schools since pre-school and her schools have taught her about most of the world's religions.... She understands a lot about the Jewish religion for example. I think it's a worry that public schools often avoid teaching anything about religion. It has influenced, for good or bad, world history more than nothing else! You don't have to practise a religion to need to understand it. Some public schools even disallow Santa, for example... why not take the time to recognise ALL the major religious celebrations rather than trying to pretend spirituality/religion doesn't exist in the world. This is the main reason public schools are not going to be our choice.


  2. #38

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bathsheba View Post
    So I would like to dispel that myth when applying it to my DD's school. I would be very concerned if the school population was predominantly Anglo here in Melbourne where the norm is multiculturalism. I agree wholeheartedly that diversity is a wonderful aspect of any school
    No, to get a predominantly anglo school you'd have to live in a regional area! No offence to anyone who chooses to do so, and I'm sure that there are exceptions, but my experience in growing up in regional Australia was a complete lack of multiculturalism. There it wouldn't matter which school you went to - I can remember less than a handful of students from different backgrounds to my own (one Chinese, one Sri Lankan and a couple of exchange students from Canada and Germany - so that hardly counts!), and I went to a state school.

    In Sydney where I live now, it wouldn't matter which school you went to there'd be more diversity than that.

    We are probably planning on sending our DD to a private school from Yr 5 onwards, but a state school until then. But we are a bit spoilt for choice in our area since there are great schools from both private and public.

    Ironically, it isn't money that is my biggest object (in that it would change my mind if it was unlimited, not that we have enough!) but the fact that most of the private schools are single sex and I'm really keen to have her go to a co-ed school for as long as possible. The private co-ed schools are too far away for us. So I guess if money was no object we could afford to go and buy a house near one of the private co-ed schools and send her from the beginning!

  3. #39

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Rural NSW
    Posts
    7,100

    Default

    I have to agree with that too Jennifer. I went to country schools and about as "multicultural" you would get would be a handful of indigenous students.... on the whole. It was 95% Anglo all the way. So I just don't 'get' that argument that my DD's private school isn't multicultural... compared to a regional school it's miles ahead. But I guess you have to compare apples with apples. Should all country kids come to the city to experience multiculturalism? Is that really the be-all-and-end-all?

  4. #40

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Ever so slowly going crazy...
    Posts
    2,275

    Default

    That was so true Bath, when we were at school, there were just a few indigenous kids. I actually find that the kids catholic school is more multi cultural up here now than the public schools!! My children have a few nationalities there now, and a lot of Sudanese (sp?) that have been moved here are at the school. There lovely kids, and my 7 year old took some under his wing. It was just lovely. The school has taught the kids all about Sudan, and in such a small school, my kids have gotten to know them well.

    I just find their school so caring, and each child truly is treated as an individual. Even their homework is personalised to their capabilities, not just handed out to whole class. My daughter gets very personal teaching for her troubles with reading, and this year, so she is prepared for years 5 & 6 before high school, her teacher is staying with her ( and two others) twice a week, for free tutoring after school hours. I never had anything even close to what my children are getting now when I was at a public school here.

  5. #41

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Boyne Island
    Posts
    6,330

    Default

    I would stay public for Primary and depending on how they were going maybe go private for high school. I like the high school here though but haven't had a child there yet so who knows

  6. #42

    Default

    Our kids currently attend a fantastic public primary school in Queensland - 15kms outside of Brisbane city - in a semi rural setting - surrounded by ex dairy land and acreage, etc. As far as public schools go, it is excellent in terms of its class sizes, school results, etc. It has a real community feel to it.

    However - I would point out that it is certainly not as "diverse" as some folk claim public schools to be, in terms of its population, etc. Out of 360 kids, I think there might be one Asian family and one Indian family - and one family from the UK. A lot of the families are also from higher socioeconomic backgrounds.

    We WILL be sending our kids off to a private school (daughter will be going next year in grade 6 - and for convenience son will be attending the junior grammar attached to that school next yr in grade 2). My husband and I both come from very "average to below average" public high schools and we were absolutely fine.

    However - here in QLD - there is an emerging trend of creating these humungous high schools of 1700 kids plus, which in my opinion, is way too large. I think my kids (esp. daughter) would get lost in our local Kenmore High School (1700 kids).

    So we are looking at the private school simply because it is small and has very small class sizes (17 in grade 2 classes and 19 in grade 6 classes). We are also looking at making the move next year simply to help them make a smooth transition (daughter particularly) prior to high school.

    So we do not have a bent towards private vs. public in any sense whatsoever - but for us, the size of the school and the size of the classes are what counts. BTW - from going to all of the open nights and days at this Ipswich Grammar School, I can definitely say that it is more diverse than our public school in terms of multiculturalism and socioeconomic groups, etc. (Not that one can ever really be sure re the socioeconomic thing, can they?) So I concur with Bathsheba on that point.

    Tracy

  7. #43

    Default PS.......

    ..............oh yeah - I forgot to mention in terms of diversity - we DID have ONE indigenous family up until a year ago at our Brisbane semi-rural public school. But HEY - that was ERNIE DINGO's kids. So there is absolutely no diversity at our school in reality.

    Tracy

  8. #44

    Default

    I've been thinking about diversity in schools lately because we're hoping to move to the Blue Mountains soon. The two towns we're looking at buying in both have great schools but I'm a little bit worried that my children will be a target for bullies and discrimination. Their cousin will be at one of the schools but his Mum's not a raghead like me so he will be able to slip under the radar.
    TBH at this point I'm thinking that although I prefer public schooling if my boys come home and say that they're having assues with racism I might just suck it up and enroll them in a private school.
    It's so sad that in this day and age we still have to worry about such stuff.

  9. #45

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Forestville NSW
    Posts
    9,031

    Default

    We were actually contemplating moving to the other side of town in Brissy to go to the Montessori school at Fig Tree Pocket. I like the philosophy there & if money wasn't an option...

    But we are moving to Sydney and luckily where we are moving has options. The Montessori is in our suburb but is $2300 a term, so if $$ wasn't an option thats where our girls would be going, but because it is we have found an independant school which fits our families philosophy.

  10. #46

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Sydney NSW
    Posts
    4,843

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dachlostar View Post
    I've been thinking about diversity in schools lately because we're hoping to move to the Blue Mountains soon. The two towns we're looking at buying in both have great schools but I'm a little bit worried that my children will be a target for bullies and discrimination. Their cousin will be at one of the schools but his Mum's not a raghead like me so he will be able to slip under the radar.
    TBH at this point I'm thinking that although I prefer public schooling if my boys come home and say that they're having assues with racism I might just suck it up and enroll them in a private school.
    It's so sad that in this day and age we still have to worry about such stuff.
    Dach, often the private schools can be more racist because they tend to have less racial diversity than the public.

  11. #47

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Rural NSW
    Posts
    7,100

    Default

    ... however from my experience private schools (the ones in my areas) tend to have a better "zero tolerance" for bullying than the public ones. When i was a staff member at a girls' school this was drummed into us all the time: not to allow any bullying... and to notice the more discreet forms of bullying eg exclusion from playground games etc. Whereas from what I hear kids who attend the local public schools have had their bullying experiences over looked by the staff.

  12. #48

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mrsmac View Post
    Dach, often the private schools can be more racist because they tend to have less racial diversity than the public.
    I know but I guess that I suspect that they might be more concerned about a parent voting with their feet than a public school.
    I guess I'm just a bit nervous all round about moving to an area that is so much less multicultural than our current 'hood. At the moment we're in walking distance of 3 public schools so if one doesn't fit we can just move on but if the local school up there doesn't fit it's a matter of driving to the next town.

    AFAIK all the private schools up there are church affiliated which is a bit of a problem for me - we wouldn't send our schools to a church affiliated private school.

  13. #49

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Rural NSW
    Posts
    7,100

    Default

    Sounds tricky Dach. However my DD attends an Anglican school and has at least had the opportunity to study a bit about all the world's main religions. She does a subject called "Beliefs, Behaviours and Questions" in which she has studied monothestic religions: Christianity, Judaism, Islam. Eastern religions: Hinduism and Buddhism. And covers general "Existence of God", "Suffereing and Evil" and "Origins of the Universe"... from memory. She has been taught a bit about all the world's religions since grade prep. I'm very focussed on this aspect of her education (it's one of the main reasons we send her to a private school.... so at least she gets some spiritual guidance... most public schools seem to prefer to pretend that spirituality doesn't exist Don't want to spark debate... this has just been my own experience.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Similar Threads

  1. money money money
    By kittykat in forum Larger Families & Blended Families
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: September 3rd, 2007, 05:54 PM
  2. Double Prams And Money Saving Tips!
    By bigbird2girls in forum Baby & Toddler General Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: October 19th, 2006, 04:33 PM
  3. Welcome to House, Home & Money
    By Rouge in forum Home & Money
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: May 30th, 2005, 12:33 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •