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Thread: IVM - In Vitro Maturation

  1. #1

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    Default IVM - In Vitro Maturation

    Just wondering if anyone has had IVM or In Vitro Maturation done before? I'm starting IVM treatment in January at FertWA, I know it's still considered an 'innovative treatment' and not widespread but was hoping to hear others experiences?

    Last edited by sushee; November 8th, 2007 at 09:04 AM. Reason: removing link

  2. #2

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    Hi Bec,

    Only heard about it for the first time yesterday. My Naturopath/Acupuncturist told me about it! She mentioned it because with my first cycle I had 25 eggs collected but they were practically all (but one) immature. She said it is good for ppl that have PCOS. In my case I have Polycistic ovaries, but not the syndrome, but nonetheless more likely to produce more follicles. She told me that this treatment is used o/s but not here in Aust yet. Well looks like that isnt the case as you seem to be doing it! She told me that IVM gives women the chance to do a cycle and collect earlier therefore not being exposed to the risk of OHSS. They then harvest the eggs to maturation. I think it is fabulous that you have the opportunity to do this! Wishing you all the best of luck and look forward to hearing how it goes! You might very well be a case study for those of us who also experience risk of OHSS. Especially those, like you by the sounds of it, that had to cancel their cycle (presume due to OHSS risk?)
    All the best hun
    Mon

  3. #3

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    hey bec

    i too was only yesterday reading about this on a UK site. i read that about 400 babies have been born overseas that were conceived using this method. they seem to be using it for the reasons Mon described below.

    wishing you the best of luck with it all, and i hope someone can give you some information/feedback on it.

  4. #4

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    Hey Dusty, could u pm me the link if you still have it?
    I am going to mention to FS if I have the same problem with my eggs being too immature next time around.

  5. #5

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    no worries mon, i just sent them through. happy to send them on to anyone. xx

  6. #6

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    Can someone please PM me the same link?

    After two stim cycles, one with 26 eggs, one with 32, and an OHSS risk with both that meant/means no transfer... IVM is something I REALLY want to know more about!

    BW

  7. #7

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    i think i posted an artical my mum emailed me i will send it to you too BW - i think i put it in LTTTC thread

  8. #8

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    here it is again


    A cheap, painless alternative to IVF?
    Breakthrough in fertility treatment as first British babies are born using new technique
    By Jeremy Laurance, Health Editor
    Published: 25 October 2007

    A landmark in the development of fertility treatment was announced by doctors yesterday with the birth of the first babies to be conceived using a revolutionary technique that offers a safer, cheaper alternative to IVF.

    The twin boy and girl, who were born on 18 October at the Radcliffe Infirmary in Oxford, were conceived using In Vitro Maturation (IVM), a method that dispenses with the use of costly fertility drugs, saving up to 1,500 on the normal price of treatment.

    The technique is also safer for the one in three women among those seeking fertility treatment who have polycystic ovaries, a condition that puts them at high risk of dangerous side effects from fertility drugs.

    Specialists said the development could make in vitro techniques available to more infertile couples by cutting the cost of treatment. Infertility is estimated to affect one in six couples in the UK but IVF costs around 5,000 a cycle and treatment is restricted on the NHS.

    Tim Child, a consultant gynaecologist at the Oxford Fertility Clinic and senior fellow in reproductive medicine at Oxford University, who led the work, said: "I think it is a safer, cheaper alternative to IVF for all women. However, for many women the success rates are currently much lower. Research in the future will address this."

    The Oxford Fertility Clinic is the only one in the UK licensed to use the technique: 20 cycles of treatment have been carried out and four other women are currently pregnant, giving a pregnancy rate of 25 per cent. This is expected to improve with further experience. In addition, without the need for drugs, repeating the procedure would be less taxing on the woman. For standard IVF, the Oxford clinic's pregnancy rate is 45 per cent.

    The parents of the babies, who have asked to remain anonymous, were delighted, Mr Child said. At birth the boy, born first, weighed 6lb 11oz and the girl weighed 5lb 14oz. "The parents are ecstatic. They have got absolutely stunning twins. They went home on Tuesday to start their new life together. It is wonderful."

    In standard IVF, the woman takes fertility drugs for five weeks to stimulate production of her eggs, which are then collected direct from her ovaries under the guidance of ultrasound, before being fertilised in the laboratory. The drugs cost between 600 and 1,500, with charges often higher in London.

    The procedure is time consuming and uncomfortable and for the third of women with polycystic ovaries there is a one in 10 risk of severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, a dangerous side-effect that in rare cases can prove fatal.

    IVM avoids the use of drugs and instead involves collecting eggs from the ovaries while they are still immature. The eggs are then grown in the laboratory for 24 to 48 hours before being fertilised and replaced in the womb.

    Mr Child said: "The main advantage is improved safety for women. Women with polycystic ovaries have a one in 10 chance of severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. IVM completely takes away that risk. IVF is also expensive. With IVM the cost is reduced, meaning it could become a more accessible form of fertility treatment."

    The technique was pioneered by the University of McGill in Montreal, Canada, where Mr Child spent two years researching and developing it before joining the University of Oxford in 2004. It has also been used in Seoul, South Korea, and Scandinavia. To date about 400 babies have been born worldwide using IVM compared with around two million by IVF.

    At present the Oxford Fertility Clinic is only offering the treatment to women with polycystic ovaries, but in the long term Mr Child said he hoped to offer the procedure to all women. "When we see patients we say these are the options and it is up to them to decide. We are not offering it to women with normal ovaries at present because we don't get enough eggs from them. It depends on the number of resting follicles and with normal ovaries you don't get so many.

    "On average we get four eggs from a woman with normal ovaries compared with 16 from one with polycystic ovaries. The procedure involves a process of attrition – two-thirds mature and two-thirds of those fertilise – so you need a decent number to start with."

    Research on developing the culture medium in which the eggs are matured in the laboratory could reduce the attrition rate so that fewer eggs are needed. The technique could then become suitable for women with normal ovaries, Mr Child said.

    A second drawback of the procedure was that eggs grown in culture had a harder outer shell than those matured in the ovary and were more difficult for sperm to penetrate. The eggs had to be fertilised by ICSI – injecting a single sperm directly into the egg. "We hope to develop the culture medium so the egg doesn't mind being grown in the laboratory and we can use ordinary insemination [mixing eggs and sperm so fertilisation occurs naturally]. But in most IVF clinics, 50 per cent of patients are treated with ICSI anyway," he said.

    A spokesman for the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority said IVF was expensive for most couples and a minority got treatment on the NHS. But it was too soon to tell whether IVM would replace IVF.

    "Anything that reduces the cost of IVF, provided it is safe, means treatment could be available to more people. But this is an emerging technology – it is very early days. The most important thing is that patients get proper information so that they can make a decision on what is best for themselves."

  9. #9

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    Hmmm... it's ICSI for us anyway due to DH's lazy, mutant sperm, so that's not an issue. With our clinic, it would be ICSI regardless because they always use it with PCOS patients.

    I guess the biggest question... when will they ever start doing this in Australia? Specifically in Sydney, and hopefully at my clinic!

    BW

  10. #10

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    Not sure about Sydney hon! I only found out about it in Perth by chance!

  11. #11
    eagleflyer Guest

    Smile IVM in Perth

    Hi Bec
    I have just found this website and am very glad
    I have been investigating IVM and would love to know the clinic name in Perth as I have been looking at going overseas to have it done
    We have been trying for 5 years and have tried everything and was put off from IVF due to the risks for PCOS women
    Thanks

  12. #12

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    eagle flyer - I am with Fertility Specialists WA which is based at Bethesda Hospital in Claremont. As far as I am aware, they are the only clinic currently offering IVM to patients. Dr Steve Junk is the embryologist there, he did his PhD on IVM and I feel really comfortable knowing he is in charge of our little embryos!

    I have done a LOT of research into IVM and these were the main factors that came out of it all:

    Traditional IVF versus In Vitro Maturation (IVM)

    Traditional IVF
    Relatively many oocytes/embryos
    High pregnancy rate/OPU
    Down regulation
    Daily Hormone Injections
    hCG injection
    Emotional stress
    Long treatment time (6-10 weeks)
    Potential side effects eg OHSS

    IVM
    Fewer oocytes and embryos
    Lower pregnancy rate/OPU BUT
    No down regulation, no manipulation of hormone balance
    None or few hormone injections
    Reduced pyschological impact
    Reduced treatment time (3-4 weeks)
    Reduced interference with daily life
    No known side effects
    Lower cost than conventional IVF

    I have just had my OPU in my first cycle of IVM and have found the process to be a lot less stressful than normal IVF, not to mention shorter!

  13. #13

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    YAY Someone else at FSWA - I don't know of anyone else who is there. It's quite funny because no one talks in the waiting area, they all keep to themselves, and I always wonder if they are someone I have spoken to on the forums Doreen Yeap is my FS, I've only met her three times (one of them was at OPU!) but have found her very good. I have mainly dealt with Steve and the nurses

    From what I understand, only a couple of people have used IVM at FSWA, all have eventually falling pg but not necessarily from IVM. It was mentioned that OPU has an ovarian drilling effect which can assist PCOS patients falling pregnant naturally which has lead to a number of pregnancies subsequent to IVM.

  14. #14
    eagleflyer Guest

    Smile hi guys

    thanks heaps for the info I spoke to Richard there yesterday about it and Im to do a few tests here first as I live near Byron Bay and if they look good I off to perth so glad to hear that we can do it here I was getting ready to move to Europe we have been trying for 5 years and as you know its very heartbreaking each time the dreaded bleed comes
    look forward to hearing your progress Bec and maybe we might get to meet up in the near future
    take care

  15. #15

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    Hi Bec, haven't been around the LTTTC threads or this thread for a while, but am glad to hear that all is going well with IVM! And wow so 7 eggs fertilised that is great! It sounds like a real break through treatment!!! Wishing you all the best! Look forward to hearing how itgoes!
    Mon

  16. #16

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    Hi BeckD...im meeting up with Dr Yeap next week to discuss IVM treatment. How was your experience? Anything i should prepare myself with? Ta

  17. #17

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    Hi positive - love the name

    IVM is a great treatment, especially if you have PCOS, or have been through OHSS before. I'm not sure of your diagnosis so not sure how.

    Doreen is great, she was my FS for two years, however I have just swapped to a different dr at the same clinic as he is my obstetrician also.

    I did two rounds of IVM last year. The first cycle I got 13 eggs, 8 eggs matured and we had one blastocyst to transfer which unfortunately resulted in a BFN.
    The second cycle we got 10 eggs, 8 eggs matured, 7 eggs fertilised, but unfortunately none made it to transfer so that cycle was a bust.

    IVM is a little easier in parts - there are a lot less drugs involved, shorter time before EPU and less scans and blood tests which is great. The two big downsides are that the egg collection can be quite painful as they are trying to get out tiny little immature eggs and piercing your ovaries a lot. The other thing is that they havent perfected this yet. Our second cycle we didnt make it to transfer even with 7 fertilised eggs so there are no guarantees.

    ETA - I dont want to give off the wrong impression, reading back my post sounded a little negative. I think IVM is a brilliant idea, but it is still definitely a 'new' technology which needs further developing to be on par with IVF. If you fit into the categories, in particular having PCOS, then IVM could definitely work for you. Good luck!

    I will say that I really like Fertility Specialists WA, Steve Junk the scientific director is fabulous, as are MOST of the nurses and other staff. Please let me know if you have any questions and I'll be more than happy to chat
    Last edited by ~BecD~; July 17th, 2009 at 02:55 AM.

  18. #18

    Default

    Hi BecD, thanks for the info! I have PCOS, one tube...I was put on 4 cycles of chlomid, inconsistant results with my last result causing OHSS. I think that was the main reason why Dr Yeap recommended IVM (meeting with her early next week, will confirm!). Im sorry to hear IVM did not work for you, it does make me a little concern though due to it being a new procedure (with only 400 IVM babies in the world...not able to find any of them from Australia?) I know with IVF there is a better success rate..do you think there is still a possibilty I may be able to be on that treatment even if there is a chance of OHSS? I wil find out next week at my appointment, but at the mean time not knowing all these answers is driving me insanse! hehehehe But thank you for your response...finally someone in Perth who has experience IVM, it was like a needle in a haystack!

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