Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 37 to 54 of 65

Thread: Suggestions on ways to quit smoking during pregnancy

  1. #37
    s361768 Guest

    Default

    Sorry if I offended anyone as well - re. my previous two posts.

    I don't think that is it constructive for mothers or other pregnant women, even those that have managed to give up, to critisize or make other women feel bad for their addiction/s.

    Not only are cigarettes physiologically addictive but they are also psychologically addictive too - how each person responds to cigarette addiction, withdrawal etc is individual. That is one reason why it is not right to judge and make others that are still struggling with their addiction feel like failures.



    For example: By boasting that you gave up when you were pregnant....because you were horrified at the thought that you were poisoning your baby etc etc etc. makes me feel selfish, it makes me feel helpless - stating the obvious about the harms and risks during pregnancy does not help - it feels like women are coming in here and saying this to be spiteful, and all it does is invoke feeling of shame - because I know...I think everyone knows what the dangers of smoking are.

    And saying.... "give up smoking then, if not for yourself but for your baby" is a comment I get a lot and I feel that this inflicts nothing but guilt. GIving up smoking is not easy, and it certaintly is not made any easier with comments such as these.

    By the way this is not an angry post - I dont mean for it to come across that way, I am sorry if it does (I am not attacking anyone in this thread).
    Last edited by s361768; February 4th, 2008 at 05:47 PM.

  2. #38
    kirsty_lee Guest

    Default

    Well said... I completely agree 110%

  3. #39

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    397

    Default

    i didnt post this thread to discuss the pros and cons of smoking. Yet i do respect all the posts that have been made.

    i needed help. Simple as that, i know what effect it has on a baby, i think any Educated, mature, rational woman (or man) does. Knowledge is power, but its what we do with that knowledge is what makes the difference.

  4. #40

    Default

    I've just started a thread for all the quitters to support each other on their journeys because it seems to me that there is a need for it
    http://bellybelly.com.au/forums/show...56#post1138556

  5. #41

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    in a land of screaming kids.
    Posts
    1,802

    Default

    Thank you Dach. I agree. There is a great need for it. And I'd like to thank people here for putting their tips for quitting in here. Quitting smoking is hard work and it is something that takes time. Anyone who cuts back or tries to quit when pg is being responsible and they deserve all the encouragement others can give them. Keep up the good work girls *hugs*

  6. #42

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by s361768 View Post
    Sorry if I offended anyone as well - re. my previous two posts.

    I don't think that is it constructive for mothers or other pregnant women, even those that have managed to give up, to critisize or make other women feel bad for their addiction/s.

    Not only are cigarettes physiologically addictive but they are also psychologically addictive too - how each person responds to cigarette addiction, withdrawal etc is individual. That is one reason why it is not right to judge and make others that are still struggling with their addiction feel like failures.

    For example: By boasting that you gave up when you were pregnant....because you were horrified at the thought that you were poisoning your baby etc etc etc. makes me feel selfish, it makes me feel helpless - stating the obvious about the harms and risks during pregnancy does not help - it feels like women are coming in here and saying this to be spiteful, and all it does is invoke feeling of shame - because I know...I think everyone knows what the dangers of smoking are.

    And saying.... "give up smoking then, if not for yourself but for your baby" is a comment I get a lot and I feel that this inflicts nothing but guilt. GIving up smoking is not easy, and it certaintly is not made any easier with comments such as these.

    By the way this is not an angry post - I dont mean for it to come across that way, I am sorry if it does (I am not attacking anyone in this thread).
    Since I feel this post is aimed at me, I feel inclined to reply to it.

    My post was directed at the post over the page, I'm sorry if I offended you, I didn't even read your posts previously and didn't even know you posted to this thread. I was referring to the lady that smoked all through her pregnancies and talked about how her baby's were fine, high birth weights, etc. I wasn't critisizing anyone, but a post like that upsets me because it downplays the affect of smoking on babies. I wasn't 'boasting' that I gave up either like you imply, I felt the need to mention it so people knew that I wasn't coming from a completely blind perspective, that I 'get' how hard giving up is.

    I'm not trying to make anyone feel guilty, I only read the OPs post and then the one I referred to over the page which is why I was just saying that saying that your babies are fine despite smoking isn't something to be proud of. And the member also refers to asking her doctors to give her concrete proof and she said they couldn't - well, it's very well known and been proven over and over again that smoking DOES cause bad effects in babies. There's no disputing that.

    It was the only thing that made me give up, to see the harsh reality of no matter what way I wanted to paint it in my mind, that I could to very bad things by continuing to smoke, and this was confirmed once I started bleeding in pregnancy and continued to bleed till I was 14 weeks pregnant. I don't see how me saying that I saw giving up smoking was for my baby, not for me is trying to make you feel guilty. I was talking about my experience and I don't feel responsible if that makes you feel guilty or selfish. I have just as much right to talk about my experience as anyone else on this thread.
    Last edited by Aranah; February 5th, 2008 at 08:56 AM. Reason: Too harsh

  7. #43

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Recently treechanged to Woodend, VIC
    Posts
    3,480

    Default

    Can we not let this devolve into a who said what and what they meant. Personally, I'm bored of reading that in so many threads. Maybe it would help if people actually took the time to read what other people have said in its entirety - I know it takes longer but would lessen the misunderstandings.

    This thread, as the original poster made crystal clear, is about supporting someone on their mission to quit, not a debate on whether smoking is right or wrong or what its effects are.
    Last edited by fionas; February 5th, 2008 at 09:20 AM. Reason: typo

  8. #44

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    397

    Default

    thank god for that!! thanks Fiona.

    Basically i actually stopped reading this thread even though i was seeking advice and help. I didnt want support by saying "dont worry baby will be fine" i wanted advice on how to overcome this difficult time.

  9. #45

    Default

    .....
    Last edited by River; February 18th, 2008 at 01:30 PM.

  10. #46

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    275

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by River View Post

    Best of luck, it's a tough road, but if you are determined to do it you will. I must say that some days I just sit and bask in the fact that giving up smoking was one of the best decisions I've ever made and possibly the best thing I've ever done for myself.
    So so so true. Giving up has been a sort of accomplishment I'm proud of, not that I was ashamed to smoke in the first place. How are you doing with quitting, Blakesmummy? Sending lots of good vibes your way.

  11. #47

    Default

    Hun i havent posted in this thread before and i just wanted to say that i understand how hard it is to quit. All i can offer you is the advise that was given to me. WHen i found out i was pregnant i stressed becasue i was already about 7 weeks gone adn i had been smoking the whole time. I spoke to the docotr and he told me it was better for both me and bubs if i gradually gave up, so that is what i did. I never use to notice how many smokes i had a day so i starting taking tally. The way it worked for me was that i put my mind to it and decided every 3 days i would cut out one smoke. This suprisingly really helped me. Soon i was done to one smoke a day and then iw as only ever having a smoke once every second day and so on.

    I hope this helps you it really was good for me but everyone is different. My mind was telling me i had to quit as my sisters partners little girl has a mild case of cerebral palsy from being born too early now the doctor said to her mother that if she was a smoker then bubs probably wouldnt have survived becasue her little lungs wouldnt have been able to handle it. With this in the back of my mind and the help from my darling partner i am now a non smoke

    Good luck and i really hope all goes well for you

  12. #48

    Default

    Whoever said the cigarette companies should be shouldering more of the blame is absolutely right!

    When I read about people who smoke in pregnancies, I very much think 'there, but for the grace of God, go I'. I have shocking willpower when it comes to junk food, and am hence overweight. I shudder to think of how I would be if my culture/family/friends had ever encouraged me to smoke. I happen to not like the feeling of smoking, it makes me cough, which has nothing to do with me being saintly enough not to choose to smoke while pregnant.

    I could easily be one of those people addicted to a few packs a day, and I know I would find it shockingly hard to quit. You all have my sympathies, and I wish you strength and courage to overcome the temptations!

  13. #49
    clare076 Guest

    Default

    Mummatotwo, well done for attempting to quit, it is a hard road and I am sure you will have your ups and downs but you can succeed.

    Firstly do not beat yourself up over this, if you are anything like I was I smoked because I was stressed, then stressed because I smoked, hence lighting another. Vicious circle.

    The way I quit was to make some rules ( I was a pack a day girl), firstly no more smoking in the car. Which eliminated at least 5 cigarettes a day. It took about a week to "get over the loss" of these cigarettes, then I eliminated cigarettes on the weekend, I then allowed myself 5 a day (cutting me down to a pack a week) then I would only allow myself to smoke half of the cigarette, by that time I had pretty much decided I did not need them anymore.

    I did try numerous ways to quit but I found this is what worked.

    Good luck
    xxx

  14. #50

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Glenroy
    Posts
    1,466

    Default

    Hi,
    I was really unsure whether to reply to this post, just because it's hard to know how you're going to be interpreted.
    I was a smoker when I fell pregnant the first time, but managed to cut down to only a few a week (not important).
    The thing that worked for me was a change in mindset. I had to stop viewing a cig as a reward (you finished your task, now go outside and light up, you got through that stressful situation, step out and spark...) - Esp at work, but even at home if I knew noone would find out and I'd struggled to get B to sleep, that was my prize.
    Instead I would go to the coffee shop next door and have a hot choc instead, or, when I was at home, I decided to knit the baby a welcoming blanket. If I really wanted a fag I had to knit 3 rows first (and go outside to have it). They say the craving takes 15 mins to pass, so if you can keep busy for that time (but promise yourself that if you really want it after that then you can) it may be enough to get you through.
    This time around I had my last cig the day I found out I was pg (there was only 1 in the pack and I just didn't buy any more, decided it was not negotiable - easier to do since I wasn't smoking regularly any more) and only had another a couple of weeks ago. Luckily I didn't like it.
    I wish you lots of luck, I know you can do it, just don't beat yourself up in the mean time

  15. #51

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    I live in a small country town in NSW called Hay. Very remote and very quiet lol
    Posts
    32

    Default I know the feeling...

    I know what you are going through darl It's so dam hard. I smoked all through my first pregnancy with my son who is now 11. I did suffer pre-clampsia and high blood pressure come the end of my pregnancy, but you know what ?? it still didn't stop me from smoking

    I am now pregnant with my second child, i am around 9 week's and i have been trying to stop smoking as well and it's hard, it's VERY hard especially when you have smoked for soooooooooo long. My son put's the guilt trip on me saying "your hurting the baby" etc etc, and it stresses and depresses me, but the thought of the cravings for a cigarette stress and depress me as well My GP told me to cut down which i have done, i really want to give up, but the cravings always stop me, i hate the feeling of the craving.

    I suppose time will tell hun, it's a point of being strong and gradually slowing down till you finally stop.

  16. #52

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    397

    Default

    hi wombles.

    looks like we have the same due date, can i add you to msn, and maybe we can help one anotha with this?

  17. #53

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    On the fringe
    Posts
    56

    Default

    You go girls!!

    Quitting is hard, damn hard. I've had a bazillion goes at it, but now is the last time.

    About the cravings, it only takes about 12 hours forthe nicotine to leave your body and about 5 days for all the byproducts to go. So the bodys physical craving for smokes is gone quick quickly. The mental craving, on the other hand, goes on forever. It's habit. I've found a few things that have really helped me this time are
    1). I really, really want to. As opposed to I should/its a good idea etc. You have to be totally ready to quit.
    2). Understanding the habit makes it a bit easier. When you're "craving" remind yourself it's not your body craving it but only your mind. You want one because you USED TO always have one at this time. Changing your habit means changing your thinking.
    3). Quitting really sucks, and I'm sick of going through it, so if I don't smoke again I won't have to quit again
    4). Having a smoke doesn't mean you've failed and you're a smoker, it just means that you've had a smoke. It's not an excuse to have another one.
    and finally
    5). Everyone will tell you about the negatives, but the positives are what keep me going. Climbing stairs without wheezing, I don't stink (as much, anyway :wink: ), I'm richer in health and wallet.

    Hope this helps and remember. You're doing this for yourself, not because people are telling you to.

  18. #54
    paradise lost Guest

    Default

    Hi ladies,

    I already posted on this here, but i'll copy and paste to save you hopping about.

    I've never smoked, but i did used to work in smoking cessation for the NHS, helping people to quit.

    In terms of what it does to your body, nicotine is AS ADDICTIVE as heroin. But because it is legal and widely used, people who want to quit and find it hard have a lot of guilt piled onto them. You are not imagining it. It is really, really hard.

    But the good news is that anyone who wants to quit (smoking or heroin) can if they get the right assistance. Quitting on your own is very hard, it's far better to have counselling and/or company - there may be quitting programmes you can join where you can talk to other people about the struggles and triumphs of the quitting journey. Most doctors are reluctant to prescribe NRT (nicotine replacement therapy- patches, gum, etc.) to pregnant women because the stimulation of nicotine in any form increases the risk of miscarriage, but if you are a heavy smoker the risks of products like the nicorette microtab (which is low-dose and can be used only when you're desperate, rather than a patch which you wear all the time) are outweighed by the benefits of you quitting. It is always worth asking what help there is available, don't struggle on alone trying to quit this horribly addictive drug and don't let other people make you feel guilty about the fact you smoke when you are trying to quit.

    The usual problems for the baby are reduced blood-flow through the placenta which can lead to slower growth, and chemical stiumlation which can lead to premature birth, BUT when a woman is very stressed she can make massive amounts of adrenalin within her own body which have similar detrimental effects and (some studies have shown) can even change the baby's brain as to how it will cope with stress after birth. Sometimes having one cigarette really is the lesser of two evils. Ideally life should not be so stressful that people need to smoke to cope, but bad things happen to good people. People get injured, fired, killed, ripped off, every day. If something awful happens and you reach for the cigarettes it's important to move FORWARD from that into your quit, and not dwell on beating yourself up for being "bad".

    For those of us who smoke during pregnancy but quit before birth, breastfeeding appears to COMPLETELY negate any damage to the foetus (fully-breast fed babies whose mothers smoked for at least 2 months during pregnancy but then quit before birth show no differences to infants whose mothers never smoked, the SIDS asthma and excema risks seem to be negated by boobie feeding) so feeding options can be a good place to start if one is feeling guilt or that one wants to undo any potential harm - there are lots of positive steps that can be taken from cutting down to quitting to breastfeeding.

    For those of you who have quit and are missing the 3 minute smoke breaks in your day: how important is your child's welfare? In the old days you would make them safer by going away from them to smoke. They NEED unstressed mummies! This morning you make your coffee and you make sure the kids are safe and you pop out for a mumma-break for a few minutes. It was important not to smoke around them, it is MORE important that you are able to keep your sanity, time-out is a valuable weapon in the war on stress and exhaustion. Take your break with a light heart, it really IS for the good of your kids.

    Bx

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Pregnancy Symptoms in the Second Trimester
    By BellyBelly in forum Pregnancy - Second Trimester General Discussion
    Replies: 100
    Last Post: November 3rd, 2014, 11:48 AM
  2. Early Pregnancy and HcG Levels
    By Astrolady in forum OPK's, HPT's & Other Home Tests Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: March 4th, 2009, 10:15 AM
  3. Cochrane Review: Aerobics in Pregnancy
    By BellyBelly in forum Pregnancy Forums
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: October 17th, 2006, 06:51 PM
  4. Pregnancy and Smoking
    By happyhappy in forum Pregnancy Forums
    Replies: 49
    Last Post: October 31st, 2004, 04:56 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •