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Thread: Anyone else Gestational Diabetic or curious about it?

  1. #91

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    Charleygirl - 8.8 isn't too bad at all. My GTT test came back 9.6

    As for pasta, I was told that 1/3 cup cooked = 1 serve of carbs and that I should aim for 3-4 serves of carbs per main meal and 1-2 per snack. A serve of carbs is 15g if you look at the total carbs column on your food labels. So you can have a cup of cooked pasta or rice and that would be 3 serves towards your total for that meal which means you only have 1 serve left for your sauce.

    There are some things which are considered "free" so you can have as much as you want: lemons, passionfruit, berries (these are the only "free" fruits), sugar-free soft drink, non-starch veges, etc.

    My biggest surprise was fruit juice - 100ml of pure orange juice = 1 serve of carbs, so if you had a regular size glass it would be equivalent to a whole meal worth!! I'm drinking pepsi max now instead of oj which seems rather ironic!



    The diabetes websites all have good lists of what you can have.
    Good luck!

  2. #92

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    Hi all, i will add myself to the GD club too. Was diagnosed about 1 week ago. Seen the Educator and Dietician, have 1 week of stats and see endo tomorrow. So far they are looking good with diet changes alone.

    A query for those monitoring their levels - how accurate have you found your meter? On a few occasions when i have gotten what seemed "high" figures, i retested with the same blood within 1 minute and got entirely different results ie initially was 7.6 then 1 minute later was 6.7

    Have you found this happening? Whats the right figure? Has anyone mentioned this to their endo or educator and got some explanation?

    When they monitor you so strictly in pregnancy, it seems every little difference seen in the levels is something to look into. If you were classed as diabetic but not pregnant most times they would not even consider such a fluctuation important enough.

  3. #93
    kerry Guest

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    Angie - My re-tests always come back abuot the same, so maybe it is your glucometer. I'd mention it just incase.

    Oh BIG WELCOME to Angie and Charlie.

    8.8 isn't too bad so don't worry. Mine was 16.4. Don't worry too much about having to wait until 13/9 for your appointment. If it was an issue your OB would have got you in much sooner. In the mean time go to the diabetes web site. Also if you google gestational diabete's you can get some great meal plans and tips.

    Biggest tip... besides cutting the sugar, is dump the white bread and go for grainy stuff or low gi bread like proformax.

    Since switching to a completely low gi diet I have only needed one insulin injection in 7 days and I have managed to keep most of my bsl's below 7.5 (which for me is really good as I was having readings in the high teens and even a few in the low 20's).

    I am going to start a GI recipe thread in the recipe section.. I might even do it today.

  4. #94

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    Saw doc yesterday, and he said even though my highest reading has been 7.7 (and most are below 7.0, fasting highest has been 5.7) he said he's considering putting me on insulin... would that really be necessary? Judging by what I've read here my levels seem quite good now, and I don't want to take insulin unless I really have to! When I questioned him he said to keep monitering for another week and we'll discuss it then. He said if I wasn't preg then my levels would be fine, but they like to keep them as low as poss in pregnancy...

  5. #95

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    Donella, they really are very strict in pregnancy.

    I saw the endo for the first time on Friday and she wants me to be 5 or under for fasting and 6.7 and under for 2 hours after meals. The targets she has given me are very tough indeed but she said when it comes to pregnancy, the babys and mums health is paramount and hence they have no hesitation in giving insulin. Right now im holding steady on these targets but its a tough ask indeed.

    I saw a really good dietician recently too and she has found that her clients have had kept their levels low by doing excercise. She has asked that between the 1-2 hour mark after i have a meal to go for a 15 minute walk. She has seen this to be very effective, so im going to start this as of tomorrow and see what effect it may have on my numbers. She has also suggested some other food alternatives etc. She was great in that her aim is to try and keep you off insulin, which i find the endos soemtimes dont always want to take this path and prefer the more medical intervention approach.

  6. #96

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    Thanks Angie. I agree that it's better to try and control it with diet and exercise than insulin - now I just need to prove to my doc that I can do it!! I'll try the walking after meals also...

  7. #97
    kerry Guest

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    Angie - thanks for the walking tip.. I'm gunna give it a burl.

    The insulin injections actually hurt less than the bsl testing so don't stress. Also its better for bubs as they are less likely to get Hypoglycemic and will need less needles that bubs will need in their heels post birth.

  8. #98

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    If they decide I do need the insulin, my hospital is conducting a trial into injections vs tablets... they allocate at random, so I might end up with tabs rather than needles. It's not having needles that bothers me, I just fugure if my levels are below what they recommend, then why should I have to take anything? I haven't had an after-meal reading of above 7.0 since last Tuesday, and I've only had 1 morning test above 5.0, so I reckon that's pretty good!! \/

    I've never been known for my willpower, so I'm quite pleased with myself... I've even given up coke and chocolate! I guess knowing I'm doing it for my baby makes all the difference.

  9. #99

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    just wanting to let you know that the walking thing has worked for me and i had some really good results yesterday and again this morning. Even after a largish fathers day lunch, i got a 6.1 reading by slotting in a 20 minute walk at about the 1 hour mark after finishing eating.

    would like to hear what you think about it too

  10. #100

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    Angie - I did the same, went for a walk after big lunch (including a small slice of choc cake!!), and got a 6.3 reading... not bad!

    I have a question - tonight I have my FIL's 60th and we're going out to a restaurant for what I know will turn into a long, 3 course meal... even though I will be being careful about what I order, I'm not sure about when to test... I know it's supposed to be 2 hours after your start eating, but what happens if I am actually STILL eating after 2 hours??? I mean, in a restaurant it's likely that desert will arrive 2 hours after the entree if that makes sense. So if I start my entree at 7pm, do I test at 9pm even though dinner may not be finished by then?!? #-o

  11. #101
    kerry Guest

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    TIPS FOR EATING OUT… By Alan Barclay
    Due to our increasingly busy lifestyles and craving for more leisure time, more and more Australians are eating meals prepared outside the home on a regular basis. Our multicultural influences have given us a large variety of foods to choose from, from humble hamburgers, barbecue chicken, pizzas and fish and chips to Thai, Indian, Italian and Mexican. Eating out is one of life’s pleasures, but can you eat healthily, enjoy your meals and still keep your blood glucose level in control when you have diabetes? The short answer is yes. Most restaurants can provide you with a nutritious and enjoyable meal if you choose carefully and keep a few important points in mind.
    If you are likely to be eating later than usual and you use insulin or certain tablets (e.g. Diamicron, Minidiab, Daonil, Diabinese or Rastinon), take your medication with you and have it as the meal arrives so as to avoid having a hypo (hypoglycaemia). This can also protect you from unexpected delays at the restaurant.
    Make sure you choose a meal that will provide you with enough carbohydrate. If a particular dish does not have adequate carbohydrate in itself, ask for extra bread, rice, potato, fruit or fruit juice.
    If, when your meal arrives, it contains more carbohydrate than you would normally eat, you can either choose to leave some of the food on the plate or ask for a doggy bag – you don’t have to eat it all. If you use insulin, you may choose to increase your dose of quick-acting insulin before the meal (ideally, any changes to medication should be discussed with your doctor).
    Beware of saturated fats! Creamy sauces, dressings, mayonnaise, butter, cream or regular milk are often served with a meal and are generally high in saturated fat. So are chips, pastries and some high-fat meals (e.g. sausages, many cold meats). Although they won’t necessarily affect your blood glucose levels, they are potentially fattening and will raise your blood cholesterol levels if eaten in excess.
    If there aren’t any foods on the standard menu that look suitable, don’t be afraid to ask the restaurant to prepare something different for you. If they value your patronage (most do) they are usually happy to prepare or modify a dish that meets your requirements.
    What about the drinks? Many restaurants will provide complimentary iced water to drink with your meal. See the section on drinks in the article ‘Festive Fun’ (page 5 of Conquest, Summer 1999) for some additional ideas and safe drinking tips.
    Plan ahead! If you can, choose restaurants that have at the very least a selection of nutritious options. Think about how much food you want to eat and then decide whether you will have an entrée, main course and dessert, or just one or two of the options. For example, you may decide to have just the main, two entrees, an entrée and a dessert, or perhaps just the main and the dessert.
    To help guide you in the decision-making, the dieticians at Diabetes Australia have prepared a list of ideas for eating out.

  12. #102

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    Thanks Jo - I know the restaurant I'm going to will be fine for menu selection... my question is actually more to do with when I should do my blood test. I'm supposed to test 2 hours after starting the meal, but I'll probably still be going then, so do I test anyway or wait till meal is finished?

  13. #103
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    Eating outand diabetes
    Eating away from home is one of life’s great pleasures. By understanding howto make healthy food choices, you can select a suitable meal when eating outwithout compromising your overall diabetes control. Consider the frequency of which you dine out. If you dine out regularlychoose healthy items. If you dine out less frequently, the occasional splurgeshould not affect your control. There is no need to go to a special restaurant if you have diabetes. By makinginformed choices you can make healthier selections which are more in linewith the Dietary Guidelines for Australians. These recommend:
    • A diet low in fat and particularly low in saturated fat.
    • Eating plenty of breads, cereals (preferably wholegrain), vegetables(including legumes) and fruits.
    • Eating only moderate amounts of sugars and foods containing addedsugar.
    • Choosing low salt foods and using salt sparingly.

    Here are a few ideas to help make the most of eating out and enjoying it!

    Insulin and eating out
    When eating out your meal may be served later than usual. To avoid hypos,take your insulin with you and give your injection as the meal arrives. Be sure to choose a meal with adequate carbohydrate. Ask for extra bread, rice,potato, fruit or fruit juice if there is inadequate carbohydrate in your meal.
    If you are having a bigger meal with more carbohydrate than usual, you maywish to increase your insulin dose prior to the meal on that special occasion.Discuss this with your doctor or diabetes educator if you are not confident todo this by yourself.

    Drinks
    • Ask for a jug of iced water to quench your thirst before ordering other drinks.
    • Drink water: plain, mineral, or soda.
    • Low Joule/Calorie soft drinks.
    • Coffee, tea, herbal tea.
    • Don’t drink too much fruit juice.

    Eating at a friend’s house
    This can sometimes be a difficult situation as food choices are usually beyondyour control. Don’t worry - the occasional special meal out should not affectyour overall control. Don’t be afraid to ask for a carbohydrate-containing snack such as a bread roll,crackers or fruit juice if you have had your insulin and the meal is delayed.

    Restaurants
    Many restaurants serve food that easily fits into a healthy eating plan. Most also value your patronage and are more than happy to oblige should you not find a suitable menu choice. So, feel comfortable in asking restaurant staff forinformation about the menu and to make simple changes if required.

    Type of restaurant - Tips for healthier food choices
    Italian Choose minestrone/vegetable soup rather thancreamy soups. Choose grilled fish or other seafood.Choose pasta with tomato or vegetable based sauces. Choose lean meat or chicken.
    Greek Choose yoghurt or bean based dips. Choose grilled marinated meat on skewers or inLebanese bread with salad. Choose felafel, kibbi, tabouleh and bean salad.
    Mexican Choose tostadas, enchiladas, burritos or tacos. Choose less meat and more beans. Ask for less cheese, sour cream and gaucamole. Ask for extra salad as a filling or side dish.
    Indian Choose oven baked samosa, lean meat/chicken/fish incurry sauces, herbs, spices or tandoori. Choose curried vegetables, steamed rice, naan,chapati, roti. Limit curries based on cream/coconut milk/coconutcream, rice pilau, poori (deep fried flatbread).
    Asian (Chinese, Thai, Malaysian) Choose noodle/vegetable soups. Try steamed entrees instead of fried. Choose steamed, braised, curried, or barbequedseafood/lean meat/skinless poultry. Choose stir fry dishes with leanmeat/fish/poultry/tofu and vegetables. Choose steamed rice or noodles. Limit dishes containing coconut cream/milk. Limit deep fried or battered dishes. Fill your plate with rice/noodles and vegetables, and use the meat/fish/poultry as the flavouring.

    Other tips
    Ask for an entrée size meal as a main dish.
    Choose clear soups, consommés or light vegetablesoups rather than cream soups.
    Limit dishes described as au gratin, creamed,battered, crispy, pan fried.
    Try a crusty roll without butter or margarine.
    Request sauces or dressings to be served separately, soy ou can control the amount you use.
    Order extra steamed vegetables without butter, or a salad without dressing to help fill you up.
    Share a dessert or ask for a small serving.
    Have fresh fruit salad or sorbet instead of rich desserts.
    Beware of extras eg butter with bread, chips withmeal, chocolates and cream with coffee.
    If the meal is low in carbohydrate, it’s usually easy toask for some extra bread.
    Choose salads based on rice, pasta, potato or beansfor additional carbohydrate.

    If choosing from a smorgasbord,
    try not to overeat.
    First start with three or four choices, and then go back if you are still hungry.
    Eat slowly and talk a lot!

    Takeaway ideas
    Hamburgers Ask for extra salad. Request a wholegrain or wholemeal roll. Ask for no butter, margarine or mayonnaise on the roll. Choose meat, cheese or egg (not all three). Choose a lean meat, chicken or fish patty.
    Pizza Ask for a thin and crispy base instead of a thick panfried pizza base. Choose low fat toppings like mushrooms, pineapple,capsicum, onion, eggplant, tomato and seafood. Limit high fat toppings like extra cheese, salami and peperoni.
    Chicken Choose barbecued chicken rather than crumbed or fried chicken. Remove the skin and limit the gravy. Have salads, bread rolls, mashed potatoes, corn or peas instead of chips.
    Fish and chips Ask for fish to be grilled if possible. Choose thick/straight cut chips or wedges instead of French fries and ask for a small serve.
    Stuffed potatoes Ask for toppings of salad, baked beans, creamed corn,tuna/salmon, low fat cheese like cottage or ricotta. Limit high fat toppings like regular cheese, sourcream, ham, bacon, butter or margarine. Eat the skin for extra fibre.
    Sandwiches (fresh or toasted) Ask for wholegrain bread with less or no butter/margarine. Include salad. Choose low fat fillings like: baked beans, low fat hardcheese, cottage/ricotta cheese, leanham/turkey/chicken, hommos, tuna or salmon.

  14. #104
    kerry Guest

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    Oh ok... silly me.. was busy doing my war and peace post when you posted next. Regardless of when I eat a meal I do my bsl 1 1/2 to 2 hours after finishing the meal. (Usually only 1 1/2 at night because otherwise I tend to fall asleep before I test.) This is what my doc and diabetes educator have told me to do. Maybe I misunderstood them and its supposed to be 2 hours after starting... now I have to ring someone to check.

  15. #105

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    there does not seem to be a standard as to when the test is to be done. I haev seen varying answers. My endo said i could test 2 hours AFTER finishing my meal, especially with dinner taking a little longer to eat and also eating slower to ensure i dont end up with heartburn/indigestion.

    Donella, this might be difficult but maybe you can stick to only a main meal and then test 2 hours after you finish this. Dessert will probably be hard to have in a restraunt as it mostly will be sugar based. The other approach to take is to eat a Entree that is only Protein based and then have your carbs at your main meal and then test 2 hours after the main meal. So at least you are testing for the carb reaction which is the main meal portion of it. It is a good question and i will ask my endo and see what she says.

  16. #106

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    Donella, hope you had a good night last night for your FIL's 60th. How did you go with your numbers? When did you test?

  17. #107

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    I had a very low-carb main (steak and non-starch veges) then some berry parfait for dessert... I tested 90 mins after dessert and got 6.3 which I though was ok. My fasting test this morning was higher than usual though at 5.4, so I don't know if that's from the sugar in the parfait still in my system this morning.

    I have to fax my results for the past week into the hospital tomorrow and they'll let me know then if they want to proceed with insulin.

    I'm feeling really tired and headachy today - that could be as I had the sugar hit last night after being so good for ages... ](*,)

  18. #108
    kerry Guest

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    Donella - When I have too much sugar the next day I am tired, headache and down right obnoxious. I tend to know when my sugar levels are getting high because I turn a bit ferral and have the worst agro mood swings. Glad you enjoyed your meal. I think your levels were pretty good, especially the 90min post meal one. I'm tipping you didn't get the chance to have a walk after dinner so that may be why your fasting one was a bit high, but it wasn't that high so everything should be fine. Good luck with the reulsts you are faxing off to the hospital.

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