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Thread: Symphisis Pubis Dysfunction (SPD or PSD)

  1. #19

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    I wasn't implying that you had BUT you said yourself that you had great births. How would you feel if birth wasn't great, it was terrible and infact you felt that it had led to being almost crippled afterwards? Would you be prepared to give vaginal birth another go or would you rather try something else? Especially if you had no particular desire to have a vaginal birth in the first place?


  2. #20

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    Hey Fionas
    You sound very much like me, My last midwives didnt even bother to take my spd seriously last birth, it was awful. My current physio has said if it hurts dont do it, so thats what im doing. Hope eveyones pain gets better soon
    Andrea

  3. #21

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    I'm not sure what you want me to say, all I'm saying is that as a follow up to my OP, I got a second opinion and I'm glad I did. I'd already had my first birth by then, despite the hideous pregnancy I'd had. This time round I was armed with MUCH better information and caregivers who helped me achieve my goals. If your goal is to have a safe CS, then take your information with you
    My responses aren't specific to any posters here - this kind of thread can be found by anyone, and there may be someone who finds it having been told CS is the only way, or cessation of BFing, or any other unfounded blanket prescriptions.
    I'll fill you (general 'you') in on what happened after my OP. I posted a similar thread on the ABA forum and was directed to a clinic recommended by one of the members there. I never looked back. The twisting of my pelvis was awful and it took a while to correct it (it kept wanting to go back, because the surrounding muscles were 'trained' by then to brace in maladaptive bays). I took up yoga again and eventually fell pg again. This time the pain began a lot earlier and I got onto it with a new osteo who was just even more fantastic than the first osteo clinic I went to! She really knew her stuff about women's physiology and pregnancy physiology. So, I still had loosening and pain, but it was managed a lot better and whilst the pain would get to me, I knew that what I had been doing meant it wasn't as bad as it could otherwise be.
    It's only just started to arc up again, 4 months post-partum, but I can put that down to some casual regard for my pelvis and getting overconfident, physically.
    ANyway, that was the spirit of my responses here. SInce when, on BB, do we suggest taking caregiver's advice at face value??

  4. #22

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    Sorry if I sounded grumpy Mayaness - I just feel pressured to have a vaginal birth from my ob and some of my physios (I take pot luck on who I see at the same clinic so I've seen about five so far which I don't mind because as you say, it's good to have more than one opinion).

    So I'm getting lots and lots of different opinions - the midwives I've spoken to have been in favour of a caesar and so has one of my physios.

    I'm not finding the case for a vaginal birth compelling because my physios are just simply saying that it generally takes less time to recover from a vaginal birth. But I know that already. My point to them is that it took me 18 months last time to recover from a vaginal birth. I feel that they are generalising and the information they are giving me is not specific or reassuring.

    So I've told my physios that if closer to the time there is a labouring position that I can hold without being in pain then yes, maybe I'll go for a vaginal birth. But, to me, it seems insane to try it IF I can't hold any position without being in pain because surely that would be further harming my pelvis - especially when it took three hours of pushing (after an already-long labour) then forceps to get DD out.

    My most recent physio when I expressed my frustration about all the varying advice said that the above sounded very sensible and told me that yes, of course a vaginal birth is better for most women with SPD but my SPD is very severe and a vaginal birth could potentially harm it further, as it did last time. She recently saw a woman who'd just had her baby (she does visits to the hospital) who had it very bad the first time but had a caesarean the second time around and said that her pelvis was absolutely fantastic and she was stoked.

    This is a huge issue for me because if it wasn't for the long recovery last time, this would be Baby No. 3 and basically if I'm going to try for No. 3, I really can't afford to be buggerising around waiting for nearly 3 years to TTC again. I don't mind my family size being limited by my fertility but I deeply resent it being limited by my stupid pelvis.

    So, once again, sorry for sounding grumpy - part and parcel of SPD and generally feeling peed off with a housebound life.

  5. #23

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    I had/have that from about 15 weeks. Now I sleep on my side with a pillow between my knees to align my pelvis & the pain has been reduced by 90%, but goes back up again if I get lazy & want to sleep how I used to.

    Fingers crossed that I can keep it at bay with exercises, stretching, & keeping my pelvis aligned.

  6. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rigga View Post
    My current physio has said if it hurts dont do it, so thats what im doing.
    Andrea, you said it so much more simply than me! That's where I'm coming from too. If opening my legs causes immediate pain now and infact any position hurts immediately then I don't see how being in those positions in labour could possibly be good. Out of all the positions that my physio has recommended, I reckon there's only one that doesn't cause me immediate pain (propped on pillows leaning forward on me knees) now so will see whether I can still do that closer to labour but it ain't looking promising. All the others are no-gos. I laughed out loud when my physio suggested I lie down with my knees apart with someone supporting each leg. I told her, "mate, I can't even lift my knees up and apart without being in pain, so that ain't gonna work."

  7. #25

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    I am literally housebound as well, because of my spd. I was informed yesterday by a male Dr that any womens spd is nothing but us getting it into our heads that we dont like pain. So with listening to his garbage about knowing more than physios and me was told to put up with the pain, even though at times its that bad i actually vomit. He pressed that hard yesterday on my pelvis i nearly passed out, and he laughed, hence after that I yelled at him to get out, had the ante natal manager running in to see what was wrong. She told him right off and said I wouldnt have to see him again. Arrogant, pompous ass. So they handed me over to a lady dr who was fantastic.
    I know my limits and do what I can.
    Andrea

  8. #26

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    That's terrible Andrea. Do they truly think we make this up?

    Luckily this time around I'm not in too much pain but that's only because I really do know my limits and limit myself accordingly by not walking which has meant I had to stop working at 15 weeks because it takes me 50 minutes of walking to and from train stations to get there. Plus, I wear my support belt, ice three times a day and go to clinical pilates once or twice a week. My life currently revolves around managing my pelvis. So I'm sure when people see me walking around the house quite well they think I'm putting it on when I tell them that I can't walk for more than five minutes. Yes, physically I can but I can feel my body seizing up and if I keep on doing that then I won't be able to walk at all, not even around the house which is my worst nightmare. My physio warned me at 7 weeks that it was already pretty bad and I was looking at a wheelchair scenario. So I'm doing absolutely everything I can to avoid it - which includes looking at all possible birthing scenarios.

    I was really sceptical but I've found icing is really good. They say if your pain gets really bad (like yours) you need to ice every two hours for 20 minutes each time. I know it's hard to do logistically but I reckon give that a go. I did barely any icing first time around because I didn't think it was doing any good but I think it's just that I didn't do it often enough. If you give the icing a red hot go for a day, it should help the pelvis settle down and become easier to manage and from there you can reduce the icing down to a few times a day or just once a day. Plus lie rather than sit as much as possible. My physio reckons sitting actually doesn't rest the pelvis because it's still working.

    I'm really sorry that you had such appalling treatment from the doctor. Totally sucks.

  9. #27

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    Thanks I will try the icing. I usually lay as my chair reclines, its so much more comfy.
    I am glad not all drs are as simple mnded as the idiot yesterday

  10. #28

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    I wouldn't say to start anything new right now, and never do anything that hurts. But I would get yourself properly checked. Don't self diagnose! I did, and I wasted a whole month telling myself that I had SPD when in fact I had SI joint disfunction. I was in a world of pain and I could have been treating my actual problem much sooner.

    Jo

  11. #29

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    What Lenny said!

    Go to your Dr & get a referral to an osteopath.

    My SPD is fairly low key now (a massive fall on my butt thanks to my horse knocking me down re-aligned everything... not recommended - but it worked!), but I find it does feel worse after BodyVive class, or any exercise that has you doing one-sided, leg spreading exercises. There are many parts in Yoga (BodyBalance) that I have to modify so I'm not encouraging further separation. But having said that - I do that class around 4 times a week now, & my pelvis feels stronger for it. However, I think my sacrum has opened a bit which I am attributing to the yoga.

    If you do maintain classes, don't try to push yourself to your pre-pg abilities. And if you do moves that require leg separation, don't go as wide as any one else in the class. I can usually feel my pubic symphysis pull & open when I go too far.

    Oh - And ALWAYS let the instructor know that you are pg & you have an unstable pelvis!

  12. #30

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    ahh - yes, they should know you're pg!

    Any of the standing strength poses (lunges / warrior poses) can open the pelvis lop-sidedly. Even balance poses (one legged poses) can be difficult.

    Talk about it with the MW & the instructors at the classes. See if they think it's worth continuing with the yoga (with some modifications), or whether you should be doing only Aqua for the time being. Best of luck!

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