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thread: I just have to get this out!

  1. #55
    Registered User

    Nov 2011
    SE Melbourne
    2,975

    Im just gonna put it out there... That letter wasn't real was it?
    I wondered too....

    either way


  2. #56

    Jun 2010
    District Twelve
    8,425

    If anyone comes to my house for dinner I expect them to bring some Haagen Daaz Peppermint Bark ice cream. And ONE spoon. I ain't sharing

  3. #57

    Mar 2004
    Sparta
    12,662

    Im just gonna put it out there... That letter wasn't real was it?
    Oh yes it was.
    Back to San Diego: The Thanksgiving Letter

  4. #58

    Jun 2010
    District Twelve
    8,425

    Marney is my hero

  5. #59
    Registered User

    Oct 2009
    Bonbeach, Melbourne
    7,177

    My response would have been,
    "Dear Marney, kindly eat a d!ck. See you on Thanksgiving. Regards, Lily."

  6. #60

    Mar 2004
    Sparta
    12,662

    Dear PZ,
    Please remember to bring the **** in a container with a lid. Remember not everyone likes to eat a **** so don't feel like you have to feed an army with it.

  7. #61
    Registered User

    May 2011
    Adelaide
    747

    I would totally mess things up on purpose. Not take a lid, bring the wrong kind of spoon, fill up the dish right to the top and then be sure to make a mess when serving....you get the idea. Either that or be too busy washing my hair to attend

  8. #62
    Registered User

    Oct 2009
    Bonbeach, Melbourne
    7,177

    Onyx, I love you. Died laughing. Cannot attend any holiday dinners until further notice.

  9. #63
    Registered User

    Feb 2008
    Gold Coast, QLD
    1,563

    From an etiquette point of view I think it's horrendous to ask your guests to bring a whole chicken.

    From an etiquette point of view asking if you can bring something is polite. Saying "no, thank you very much." is the polite response.

    At the very most you can ask your guests to bring some alcohol or something small.

    Unless it has been formally agreed everyone will bring a plate, or in the case that's normal for your group.

    Sent from my HTC Desire HD A9191 using Tapatalk 2

  10. #64
    Senior Moderator

    Nov 2004
    Chickens.
    4,989

    A little off topic: at least you KNOW if you attend, that they are actually going to EAT the chicken.

    Men have been known to do very odd things with warm cooked chook. A la American Pie.

    Trust me. I've seen it all. Don't ask about my wombat story.



    Back on topic: I agree that it's more about the nature of your relationship rather than the actual chicken. Next time you invite them over, ask them to bring the rump steak as you're doing the roast vegies.

  11. #65
    Registered User

    Feb 2006
    Mornington Peninsula, Vic
    1,624

    Please let us know what you had for dinner.

  12. #66
    Registered User

    Feb 2008
    Near the Snowies!
    2,975

    Ahahaha! That letter is gold!

    I tend to agree, it's not really about the chicken..if you know they are like this then either don't ask if you can bring something next time, or specifically request they bring something to your next gathering, or don't pursue the friendship if it is that much of an issue.

    A chicken is $10, if you were going to bring drinks or even a few different nibbles, by the time you get biscuits & dip or whatever it would probably be close to that amount anyway. $10 is a pretty cheap night out if you don't have to bring anything else..JMO.

  13. #67
    Registered User

    Mar 2009
    England (but moving back home to Oz next year!)
    78

    If it was a big group, then I think it is reasonable to ask guests to bring something. It is very costly catering.

    But for 4 people, I agree with you. It is rude to ask someone to bring a whole chicken!

  14. #68
    Registered User

    Feb 2006
    Mornington Peninsula, Vic
    1,624

    yes, IF the chicken is to be the main part of the meal then it is rude to invite guests over and then have them cater the main part of the meal - seriously who does that??? C'mon....you ask someone over to your house for dinner and then get them to bring the main course...seriously wacko....so maybe the chicken will be ...ummmmm....I don't know....I am waiting to find out what all the dishes that made up dinner were until I make judgement. So, in my Rule Book...if a host said no, please don't bring anything, then I would take along, a bottle of vino and some flowers and some yummy homemade choccies, but, if they asked, I would go with the request of what they wanted, never been asked to bring along the main dish though.....waiting......

  15. #69
    Registered User

    Dec 2005
    In Bankworld with Barbara
    14,222

    Oh. My. God. Can't. Stop. Laughing.

    After reading all of this thread I was wondering when The Thanksgiving Letter was going to get a mention. It's like the Godwin's Law of Etiquette

  16. #70
    Registered User

    Sep 2008
    Adelaide
    3,201

    Bwahahahahaha at the Thanksgiving Letter

    This thread had me pondering at the expectations we put on friends - shouldn't friendships be easier and less ......um ........ rigid than this? Many people have commented on the 'rules' - there are such specific rules in friendships? Shouldn't friendships be unconditional or if the friendship is not a healthy one, give it up!! Life is too short to worry about cooked chickens! Definitely the issue is the one sided friendship not the chook, so if the friendship is not working for you, I'd just let it die a natural death.

    When we entertain, we generally put on everything if we are the hosts, most of the time people supply their own drinks or contribute drinks to the event eg wine, some bring stuff, some don't, we don't really care, as long as our friends come and enjoy our company. If I am getting together with my girlfriends - we will contribute what we can/want to based on what's happening/if we have have something to contribute/or have the time/money to organise something - there are no preconceived expectations

  17. #71
    Registered User

    Sep 2009
    Brisbane, QLD
    1,062

    Update: I messaged friends and agreed to bring the chicken. We got there and gave them the hot chicken they plonked it on the bench (still in the bag) next to a pizza (Ham, Cheese & pineapple) and gave us knives and said help yourselves everyone...Hahahah! I have to say the look on DH's face was pretty funny. Funnily enough we got off light with only brining a chicken, they made the other couple bring apple pie, chocolate Bavarian and 2 bottles of Custard. They did make us a Cappuccino after Dinner though...

    Thanks everyone for your responses and your opinions (however varied ) were appreciated. For the sake of friendship I'm going to let this go...but I will however be more specific with accepting and extending invitations LOL
    Last edited by Blondie; June 14th, 2012 at 07:33 AM.

  18. #72
    Registered User

    Oct 2009
    Bonbeach, Melbourne
    7,177

    Thanks for updating! I think the fact that everyone brought a 'big' item is good! Sounds fair to me.

    Are your friends simply cheap, or is it possible they're struggling a bit financially? Pretty different situation to yours, but when DH and I first moved out at 18 our group of friends started throwing get togetherness at each others houses. Dressy dinner party type things. They'd assign each person a dish, and one person was a celiac (sp?) so not always easy to cater for. They'd get grumpy when we'd say that we couldn't afford that. Mind, we also simply would not go, so we weren't seen to be 'sponging'. Even bringing a few soft drinks in those early days (we were surviving off of packet noodles every night) was too much. All these friends lived at home with their parents and didn't pay board or food or bills. In fact, they still do When we had DD, we pretty much cut ties with them all because they didn't get that not everyone has a disposable income. Like I said, very different to your situation. If they're just tight, well, I'd be peeved and asking them to bring steaks to our next get together

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