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Thread: Pets & Pregnancy/Pets & Babies #2

  1. #19

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    Our dogs are only allowed on their couch and definitely not allowed on our good couches but will try if they have the chance! And they get fed a few hours after us. And the female is desexed but not the male. I really think that it must be a dominating thing, maybe he is trying to have his scent every where so the female knows that he is more dominate. And probably also laziness - we went to bed the other night and I got up about 10mins later to get a drink and I saw fresh wee on the wall!!

    I think that maybe he could be doing it to get back at us too. My girl gets a bit more attention than what he does. I have now started giving them equal attention but DP still gives the female a bit more attention because she is more playful. Do you think that could be a cause of it?

    I also think that because he has been doing it for so long that it is going to be a very hard habit to break. I actually emailed Dr Harry last night hoping to get an answer. And I just received an email back saying that Dr Harry unfortunately doesnt give out advice anymore!! So I guess I will stop at vet to see what sort of advice they can offer me.

    And hopefully some other people will give me some advise here too!


  2. #20

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    I tend to agree with Tara here, in that I think its likely to be a dominance thing. I strongly believe in the pack structure theory, in that it has worked for me for years. May I recommend a great book - "Who's the Boss" by Val Bonney.

    The key Q isn't what breed of dog, but is it desexed? Unless your DH/DP is planning on breeding or showing the dog, then its likely that he sees desexing the dog as emasculating himself ...

    With the dog, show him who's boss pretty much every interaction you have with him. Make him sit and make sure *you* go through a door first - don't just open the door for the dog and let him run outside. If he demands pats, then make him sit before you pat him - or if he sits in anticipation, make him drop (or lie down). Unless you're strong enough, dont play tug-of-war with him - you need to be able to win. And if you do think you're strong enough and just can't win, then hold the toy against your leg just above the knee and brace yourself - the dog will let go (and you've won).

    One last thing - have you checked your yard to see where he got out? Are you able to fix the fence so it doesn't happen again? In the meantime, keep him in the laundry or shed overnight so he can't run away. Or alternatively, "crate train" the dog so it has a place in the home that's definately his own, and that place may be next to your bed.

    Good luck!

    ETA: Ngala - I think you've hit the nail on the head there yourself. The key theory with maintaining the pack structure is to follow it yourself. In our house, I'm the pack leader, then DF, then blue dog, chocolate dog, pink cat, black cat. If we give attention to chocolate dog, blue dog will attack her. When either yourself or your DP come home, greet the pack in the correct order - which is likely to be DP -> you -> boy dog -> girl dog. If you're going to play with girl dog, then do it out of sight of boy dog.
    Last edited by Kazbah; March 24th, 2007 at 07:35 PM. Reason: responding to your post :D

  3. #21

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    DP says that if he was the desex the male then we may as well do him as well!

    Thanks for the advise Kazbah. We will start showing him who the boss is, I guess we need to do it with both the dogs! I normally get both dogs to sit before I give them any attention. And to sit before I let them in at night. We also get the other dog 'pushing in' when we are giving the dog attention.

    How difficult is it going to be to put the new baby in to the pack structure? I guess the best way would be the greeting hey? If I was going to come home I would great DP first, then our daughter, then male dog and female dog.

    What are the chances of one of the dogs 'pushing in' when we are giving our daughter the attention? Our dogs are good with kids that come over, they are very interested in them but I remember when I was looking after my nephew and he was patting them, the male dog got behind him and nearly knocked him over. Probably wasnt on purpose, probably just excited..
    Last edited by Ngala; March 24th, 2007 at 08:12 PM. Reason: omg typos!

  4. #22

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    Actually, it should be the other way around. Now what Val Bonney says is that most dog attacks on kids happen because the dogs are attacking the weaker (and therefore lower pack member) to put it in its place. So she recommends putting the baby at the bottom of the pack until it can fend for itself ... so greet the baby last.

    But this is controversial, and it pays to remember to NEVER leave a baby and dog alone.

  5. #23

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    We have a cat. she is a domestic short hair. She was an inside cat until half way through my first pregnancy at which time I became allergic to her. I start to weeze,my eyes puff up, I sneeze alot and sometimes I get a rash. I have also found that I have the same reaction to dogs. I have had cats & dogs all my life but now but now I can't touch them. We still have our cat but she lives outside and if I want to pat her I have to do it with my foot. Our son wanted a dog but we talked about it and got some mice instead.

  6. #24

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    Kazbah - that is very controversial. But as you said, it is best to never leave a baby alone with a dog no matter how friendly that dog can be..

  7. #25

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    I have said this before but as someone with a lot of experience working with dogs in vets and shelters. I just feel I have to mention it again so you can get a different opinion. Be very careful with the dominance structure. Val Bonney's book was written at least 10 years ago and a lot of opinions have changed since then.
    It is now more important to think about the associations your dog has with your child to prevent bites. Regardless of pack structure (which was used to explain every behaviour problem several years ago) if your dog has negative associations with your child then he is more likely to bite your child. If your dog has positive associations then he is less likely to. I strongly recommend talking to a dog trainer accredited by the delta society, or a vet behaviourist rather than learning from old books. The RSPCA up here (QLD) does training and behaviour problems and their trainers are all accredited through Delta. Their methods are up to date and based on learning theory and research.

    Ultimately you will choose your own way but I do feel responsible if I don't put my opinion forward on this. Good luck.

  8. #26

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    Default Gentle Leader Head Collar = EXCELLENT

    HI,

    Just thought I would pop in quickly and just say thanks for those that have suggested I try a head collar on my girl. I have just come back from a walk with my two dogs and I have to say it is the best walk I have had for ages!! No getting angry at my girl for pulling, I was praising her for being so good!! She is not 100% better yet, I would say 80% better but she is getting better and better with every walk. She doesnt pull, she doesnt try and get to other dogs and cats. Its great!!

  9. #27

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    Great news! Its always good to hear of something working - there are so many different methods out there, its hard to find something that works for you!

    Well done!

  10. #28

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    Now that I am 12 weeks we have started to get our 2 dogs used to the idea of bubs and their change in status and privileges. Ok- admit that we treat our dogs more like babies (which they were for 5 years). This means that not allowed on the couch or the bed. One dog is ok as she is independant and only seeks attention on her terms but the other is my baby and he loves sitting on my lap and sleeping at the end of the bed (until Dad comes in and sends him onto his mat in the kitchen).

    Have to say I am terribly upset by all this and feel I am betraying them. I realise it is for the best but I can't help feeling they are upset with me. I know its stupid but its how I feel. At least I have 6 months to get them (and me) used to the change.

    Anyway, enough rambling. Think this is a great thread as seeing that pets are family members they need to be considered in the pregnancy process as well.

    Cheers
    S

  11. #29

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    Sounds like you have a great plan Saffi!

    Good luck with it, and don't feel guilty, as your actions now make it easier for the dogs later.

  12. #30

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    Yesterday my dog started acting more unusual than usual. For example:

    Usual= Barking at people walking by the house.
    Unusual= Barking at cars driving by.
    Usual= Frantic if Juz and I leave the house w/o her.
    Unusual= Frantic if I walk out of the room

    She has taken to staying within a foot of me and insists on sleeping right up against me and not at the foot of the bed. We had a guy come and paint our roof and while I was here she was barking and growling and biting his ankles but when I was out she loved him and played with him. I find it all rather amusing and just hope that she will like the new addition to the family because she is the spoilt princess and I have made no effort to change that. I am guessing it is wishful thinking that I will be going into labour sometime today

  13. #31
    thia Guest

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    Hi,

    I'm keen to get your thoughts on this. We have a cat who was pretty much oblivious to my pregnancy. She is pretty spoilt and used to sleep on our bed which we stopped a couple of months before the baby was born and she coped with the change surprisingly well. Whenever we have visitors (especially with babies or small children) she has always run a mile, same with any loud noises, vaccuum cleaners etc she dissappears outside and we don't see her for a couple of hours.

    Our little boy is 4 weeks old and I expected that she would keep her distance due to the noise factor. I never leave them alone but I have noticed the funniest behaviour from her. When he is upset (ie. screaming the house down), instead of running outside, she comes and sits near us and waits for him to settle down. Also if she has been outside, when she comes back inside she seeks us out, does a quick smooch around my legs and then wanders off to her little bed. She often lies down a little distance away from him when he is awake and in his rocker and just keeps an eye on him and once or twice has sniffed his foot. Am I reading too much into this or is she feeling a little protective towards him? I'm keen to know how other pet owners cats have responded to new bubs.

    Thanks

  14. #32

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    SarahBarahBanana - its very interesting what you dog is doing!!You never know, she may be able to sense something happen very soon and has become very protective of you. My girl is the same, we had a guy come over to do a quote and she didnt like him one bit but she was always a bit protective. And she also follows me around from room to room. A few years back when my friend was pg, DF's dog went in to labour and the only person the dog would let near her and her pups during labour was my pg friend. So the dog must have known! Its going to be interesting to see if there are any changes in my girl when I get close to my due date..

    thia - I am not too familiar with cats as I have never had a cat but it does sound like your cat is a little protective towards your son and maybe a little curious...

  15. #33

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    Well it is close to time but still no labour for me and today Cherry Pie hasn't been following me around like the last couple of days but she is still trying to attack people that come near me and barking at cars driving past.

    It has been years since I have had a cat and Juz won't let me have one unless it can go under the car tire. I do remember one of my cats being protective of another cats kittens though so it wouldn't surprise me if he was being protective of your son. It would be great if we could read our pets minds wouldn't it?

  16. #34

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    thia, this sounds very similiar to my two puppies...
    one in particular is very protective of Eden. noone is allowed near me when i am walking with bub and puppies, shes barks them away and when hubby is doing the vacumming Gazzy(the mini foxy) will sit right next to Eden in the bouncy, as if she is standing guard and the vacumm cleaner is the on coming enemy. it is so so sweet. Even when im booby feeding Eden, Gazzy jumps up on the chair and sits in my lap behind Eden... All the time now Eden will pull off lean back and "pat"/thump Gazzy on the head.
    its lovely that ur cat is so protective, they must sense ur love and are keeping a close eye on bub as a sign of their dedication to you.
    I just worry Eden will go up and give complete strangers dogs pashes, thats what i keep catching her and Gazzy doing!!!!! Ewwwwwwwww

  17. #35

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    All the cats in my house (well, most of them) have been extra affectionate with me. They've been rubbing against my belly, sitting between my legs and sniffing my belly button. Lol. It's been strange but cute.

  18. #36
    thia Guest

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    Oh Edensmumma how cute! isn't it lovely when our old 'babies' love our new babies? I just hope it continues!

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