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Thread: Bad mother for choosing C Section

  1. #37

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    Rachel, I would suggest reading Silent Knife which has alot to say about the risks for both mum & bub. Its a great book IMO



    And yep as Bon said, the safest birth is an uncomplicated vaginal birth with no intervention. But sadly it doesn't always work out that way.

    Like Sherie said, when bub is born naturally as they go through the birth canal all the muck is squeezed out of their lungs whereas in a c/s it isn't. Zander has trouble with this for a few days after his birth & was choking on mucus. It was quite distressing for me as I was unable to move properly to hekp him so had to buz the midwives each time it happened.

    There are risks of bub being cut when they make the incision. I'm not sure how often this happens, but it has been known to be severe enough for bub to need suturing.

    Also, with elective c/s there is the chance that bub will be premmie if your dates are wrong. I'm pretty sure it said that breathing difficulties in elective c/s bubs are more common due to them being early sometimes.

    The other risk for bub is from the anesthetics they use. Bub can be sleepy due to the epidural / spinal block & can have problems with sucking because they are so drowsy.

    For what it's worth, I'm not putting this out there to scare anyone, the question was asked & I have answered as best I know.
    Last edited by {sarah}; October 17th, 2006 at 06:01 PM.

  2. #38

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    Since this thread has become a bit about c/s research.. thought I'd ask some questions that I've often wondered on how it works. Is -anything- passed through the vagina at all? eg.. the placenta? or is this removed same time as the baby? How exactly do they get the placenta to come away? Is there a risk of the uterus contracting while you're still 'open'? I'm assuming lochia is the same when the uterus contracts after the birth?

    Just curious

  3. #39

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    Is -anything- passed through the vagina at all? eg.. the placenta? or is this removed same time as the baby?
    The placenta is removed the same way as the baby is, through the incision.

    How exactly do they get the placenta to come away?
    This I have no idea on!! I expect though that it gently pulled away, same as if you have a retained placenta???

    Is there a risk of the uterus contracting while you're still 'open'?
    Again, I'm not sure LOL! I was having contractions immediately before my c/s and still had the synto drip induring so I would assume that yes there are some contractions going on unless the meds for the operation stop the contractions. Afterwards I still had the synto in so my uterus would contract down after the birth.

    I'm assuming lochia is the same when the uterus contracts after the birth?
    Yep, you still get lochia the same as a vaginal birth. I would have thought it was less due to *stuff* being sucked out during the op, but apparently c/s lochia can be quite a bit heavier from what I've heard. With nothing to compare it to I can't say.

    Anymore??
    Last edited by {sarah}; October 17th, 2006 at 07:47 PM.

  4. #40

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    Hey again Rachel,

    I can have a chat to you more about this when we catch up sometime I have been through the same thing...

  5. #41

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    I hope everyone doesn't mind me posting this, I know it's off topic and I am sorry - just wanted to address some questions. I'll move it if you prefer.

    Here's some very recent information on the risks of c/s.

    Voluntary C-Sections Result in More Baby Deaths

    LARGE STUDY shows significant evidence

    Article published in the New York Times

    By NICHOLAS BAKALAR
    Published: September 5, 2006

    A recent study of nearly six million births has found that the risk of death to newborns delivered by voluntary Caesarean section is much higher than previously believed.

    Researchers have found that the neonatal mortality rate for Caesarean delivery among low-risk women is 1.77 deaths per 1,000 live births, while the rate for vaginal delivery is 0.62 deaths per 1,000. Their findings were published in this month's issue of Birth: Issues in Perinatal Care.

    The percentage of Caesarean births in the United States increased to 29.1 percent in 2004 from 20.7 percent in 1996, according to background information in the report.

    Mortality in Caesarean deliveries has consistently been about 1 times that of vaginal delivery, but it had been assumed that the difference was due to the higher risk profile of mothers who undergo the operation.

    This study, according to the authors, is the first to examine the risk of Caesarean delivery among low-risk mothers who have no known medical reason for the operation.

    Congenital malformations were the leading cause of neonatal death regardless of the type of delivery. But the risk in first Caesarean deliveries persisted even when deaths from congenital malformation were excluded from the calculation.

    Intrauterine hypoxia lack of oxygen can be both a reason for performing a Caesarean section and a cause of death, but even eliminating those deaths left a neonatal mortality rate for Caesarean deliveries in the cases studied at more than twice that for vaginal births.

    "Neonatal deaths are rare for low-risk women on the order of about one death per 1,000 live births but even after we adjusted for socioeconomic and medical risk factors, the difference persisted," said Marian F. MacDorman, a statistician with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the lead author of the study.

    "This is nothing to get people really alarmed, but it is of concern given that we're seeing a rapid increase in Caesarean births to women with no risks," Dr. MacDorman said.

    Part of the reason for the increased mortality may be that labor, unpleasant as it sometimes is for the mother, is beneficial to the baby in releasing hormones that promote healthy lung function. The physical compression of the baby during labor is also useful in removing fluid from the lungs and helping the baby prepare to breathe air.

    The researchers suggest that other risks of Caesarean delivery, like possible cuts to the baby during the operation or delayed establishment of breast-feeding, may also contribute to the increased death rate.

    The study included 5,762,037 live births and 11,897 infant deaths in the United States from 1998 through 2001, a sample large enough to draw statistically significant conclusions even though neonatal death is a rare event.

    There were 311,927 Caesarean deliveries among low-risk women in the analysis.

    The authors acknowledge that the study has certain limitations, including concerns about the accuracy of medical information reported on birth certificates.

    That data is highly reliable for information like method of delivery and birth weight, but may underreport individual medical risk factors.

    It is possible, though unlikely, that the Caesarean birth group was inherently at higher risk, the authors said.

    Dr. Michael H. Malloy, a co-author of the article and a professor of pediatrics at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, said that doctors might want to consider these findings in advising their patients.

    "Despite attempts to control for a number of factors that might have accounted for a greater risk in mortality associated with C-sections, we continued to observe enough risk to prompt concern," he said.

    "When obstetricians review this information, perhaps it will promote greater discussion within the obstetrical community about the pros and cons of offering C-sections for convenience and promote more research into understanding why this increased risk persists."
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children
    Author of Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know
    Follow me in 2015 as I go Around The World + Kids!
    Forever grateful to my incredible Mod Team and many wonderful members who have been so supportive since 2003.

  6. #42

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    Wow thanks for that Kelly.

  7. #43

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    Wow, that's pretty scary. Why do you think Drs are so keen to give them to people? I'm now finding the whole thing really overwhealming and I really don't know what to do. The whole pros and cons of a VBAC seem to change depending on who you talk to. I have a while yet (7 weeks) before I need to make a decision. My hubby thinks I should have a C Section as I think the natural birth and seeing me in so much pain really freaked him out the last time. Agghhhhhh - I don't know what to do!!!

  8. #44

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    Remember tho with preparation etc, you can feel in control of the birth (vaginal), and it might not freak out hubby so much if he sees you managing it, and if you give him specific things to do to support you. Know what I mean?

    I think it's great that you're researching your decision. After doing lots of reading and research, just go with your gut feeling for what is best for you and baby, and don't worry about what people say, you'll know you've made an informed decision

    Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but don't you need to find an OB who is prepared to support a vbac? If it's something you would end up considering, you'd probably have to make sure your OB is supportive of it.

    All the best with deciding what to do Rachel. Whatever you choose, I hope it all goes smoothly!

  9. #45

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    It really is a tough decision isn't it Rachel & although I'm not pregnant yet I went through the same thing.

    I think the reason why Drs are so keen to perform an elective c/s is because it's very convenient for them. How easy is it for a Dr to say "Mrs Smith come in at 3pm Wednesday & have your baby" compared with being called at 1am Sunday morning and being told by a midwife /nurse "Mrs Smith is here, you need to come in."

    I really really believe that to have a natural birth you need a great support network, VBAC or not. Once my fantastic midwife had left (end of her shift), things went down hill for my labour. You need to feel safe & secure in your decision to have a natural birth otherwise IMO there will be problems.

    Like I said before, read Silent Knife, it's a great book & if DH has a look as well he might feel a bit more comfortable with the idea of a VBAC.

    Also, please don't feel like I am trying to sway you in the direction of a VBAC at all. I believe that all women should have the right to choice to birth how that want to and if you feel like you have to have a c/s for this bub then so be it. You need to feel comfortable in the decision yourself. No-one else matters in this decision at all, except your hubby, but even then it is entirely up to you which way you want to go.

  10. #46

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    Yeah I'd suggest that if you are interested in doing a VBAC (even if its a possibility) looking to find your options in your area. Like a VBAC friendly ob & hospital, maybe a private midwafe and or a doula. The more prepared you are the easier it is! One of the moderators, Christy, is due to have a VBAC soon so she might be someone to talk to about choices in your area as she's also from QLD.

    I had a successful VBAC and it was the greatest decision I ever made.

    But also remember if you do decide to have a repeat c/s then thats ok too. As Liz says the fact your decision is informed makes the world of difference! And poo poo to anyone who gives you grief no matter what you decide!

    Goodluck!

    *hugs*
    Cailin

  11. #47

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    Rach which hospital are you going too?

  12. #48

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    Im a Doula on the coast too if you are interested??

  13. #49

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    Rachel just stopping in, I have been reading & following on your posts. I too had a pretty full on first birth with 20 hours & ending in emergency c/s. I am hopefully going to be giving birth soon...but when depends on bubs. I am having a VBAC. As I posted early on the best way to make a decision is to be informed. I have been reading & reading... the books Sarah suggested were really helpful to me, as well I did hypnobirthing classes with some coaches through calmbirthing. I also have a birth support person, either a doula or a friend who is a trained midwife. Whoever is available at the time I am excited about giving birth and feel very prepared & in control this time. I can say the best thing is to wrap yourself in support for your decision. It is your decision to make & once you make it, grab people around you to help you & who will encourage you in your decision. If your DH has issues (mine is petrified that the same thing will happen this time...) make sure you have support above & beyond him. Its vital for succesful birthing! Whatever way you go.

  14. #50

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    I agree with what everyone has said. Our partners are often an essential in the birth room but sometimes it can be problematic because men are 'fixers'! They like to fix our problem, fix our pain etc and how do they fix you in labour? They can't so they want the pain relief stuff as they feel the situation is fixed. They need to be strong and encouraging but some men find this difficult. It's perfectly okay to be like this - evolution has kicked wise women support out the birth room - first there were doctors (men) and now dads. A woman supporting you in labour is ideal especially where fear is an issue as she can reassure both of you. Once fear has set and there is no continuous support, everyone is looking for the nearest exit - an epidural or caesar. One handed atm hope makes sense. I'd recommend The Thinking Woman's Guide to a Better Birth by Henci Goer. Great book.
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children
    Author of Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know
    Follow me in 2015 as I go Around The World + Kids!
    Forever grateful to my incredible Mod Team and many wonderful members who have been so supportive since 2003.

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