Is Your Care Provider Playing The Dead Baby Card?

Is Your Care Provider Playing The Dead Baby Card?

Trigger warning from BellyBelly: This article may be triggering for readers who have experienced infant loss. If you feel you may be triggered, please do not read the article. Sadly, birthworkers do see this happening to their clients from time to time, where doctors use the words ‘dead baby’ to try to convince women to have interventions to speed things up (where there are no signs of distress). It’s also been shown to happen in research. It’s absolutely distressing to lose a baby, and it’s absoutely not on to have a care provider tell you you might end up with a dead baby if you don’t have an induction without evidence of distress, either.

“If you don’t agree to an induction, you’re putting your baby at risk.”

“You need to have a c-section because your baby could get stuck and die.”

“It’s important to continually monitor your baby to make sure nothing goes wrong.”

No pregnant woman wants to hear these words from her care provider. No pregnant woman wants to put her baby at risk either.

Is Your Care Provider Playing The Dead Baby Card?

So if your care provider says something along the lines of “You must do this or your baby could die”, what should you do?

Is this genuine information about your options?

Or is your care provider playing the dreaded ‘dead baby card’?

What Is The Dead Baby Card?

It doesn’t have a very nice ring to it but, unfortunately it’s an appropriately coined phrase.

Ask around and you will probably hear from at least a few women who know exactly what the dead baby card means.

In essence, it is any statement a maternity care provider might use to take control of the decision-making for a woman’s pregnancy and birth.

The statement will generally include the words “your baby will (or could) die”, so as to persuade or frighten a woman into agreeing to a decision the care provider is advocating.

Most importantly, the statement will not have any evidence-based research to back up the care provider’s claim.

Is This For Real?

It’s not hard to find stories to corroborate the existence of the dead baby card. If you frequent online birth forums or social media groups, you’ll see many examples of women who have been handed some form of the dead baby card. They feel they were put in the most difficult position possible – and at one of the most vulnerable times in their lives.

Even so, the medical profession has debunked the dead baby card as a myth. Doctors point to healthy babies as evidence that they use whatever means are necessary to ensure a good outcome.

A Canadian study, however, has provided further insights, and solid evidence that the dead baby card does exist, and is used.

For the study, researchers ran a series of focus groups across several Canadian cities. Each group was comprised of a variety of care providers and first time pregnant women, and focused on how pregnant women and care providers in Canada manage birth in a highly medicalised and risk-averse culture of childbirth.

Care providers who were interviewed for the study commented on the use of phrases such as: “You don’t want your baby to die, do you?” These words imply that a baby is at risk (without substantial evidence) and the mother is acting in her own interests, rather than the interests of her unborn baby.

How Does This Affect Women?

Pregnancy and birth are times of great vulnerability for women. Fear can provide incredible motivation to achieve something, whether it is a superhuman feat of strength or a mental decision that goes against one’s ingrained beliefs and values.

When confronted with making a choice that involves saving her baby, a pregnant woman always puts her child first. If a trusted and experienced care provider suggests her baby is at risk unless she takes a certain action, the result is fear. Any opposition to this intervention is silenced, ensuring responsibility for decision-making is handed over to the care provider.

It is often assumed a woman who goes against the advice of her care provider is being difficult, or putting her own interests ahead of her child’s. Yet this couldn’t be further from the truth.

In the aftermath of a highly interventive birth, a woman might wonder how necessary and lifesaving the intervention really was. There are countless stories of women who experienced trauma and complications as a result of interventions they later came to deem as unnecessary.

Why Would Professionals Do This?

Your care providers are trained and experienced health professionals, who have looked after the wellbeing of many women and their babies. Why wouldn’t you believe they have your best interests at heart?

It’s difficult to believe care providers would tell women their babies were at risk unless they genuinely believed it. But when looked at in the context of the birth culture of today, it becomes a little easier to understand.

Today, in many countries, women have fewer choices for birth than ever before. The vast majority of women give birth in hospital settings, with staff who are trained to see birth as a medical event.

It’s hard to see normal birth in a medical-technical setting. In countries such as the United States, potential litigation places enormous pressure on obstetricians to circumvent any adverse outcomes. This leads to interventions that aren’t based on evidence-based practice.

How Do I Trust My Care Provider?

There are, of course, times when intervention is necessary, and even lifesaving, for mother and baby. Care providers want good outcomes too, and should be interested in supporting women to make informed decisions about their own and their babies’ wellbeing.

This not only empowers women to be the key decision-makers but also increases the positive collaboration between women and their care providers.

So how do you decide whether your care provider is playing the dead baby card, or genuinely wants to work with you for a good outcome?

Keep these questions in mind:

  • Ask your care provider to explain why it is necessary, and to tell you risks and benefits of the suggested intervention. Simply answering with ‘Because I said so’, or ‘It’s hospital policy’ or similar, isn’t giving you information based on the best evidence available.
  • Ask your care provider what alternatives there are to the suggested intervention, and what are the risks and benefits of each. Remember, the alternatives might include doing nothing.
  • Ask for time to decide. It’s rare that you’ll be asked to make a decision in less than a few minutes. You can also gauge how necessary the suggested intervention is by how urgently you need to make the decision.
  • Ask for another opinion. You can request to speak to a different care provider where you are, or seek the advice of others outside your birth setting.

It’s important to stay calm and seek an authentic communication with your care provider if the dead baby card has been played. In this way, you will be better able to understand the rationale behind the suggested intervention, and be certain whether or not it is necessary.

You can also ensure you have all the information you need to decide whether or not to interrupt the normal process of pregnancy and birth and go ahead with medical intervention.

If you have tried everything and still feel your care provider is using the dead baby card to influence your decision-making, it might be time to think about finding a new carer, if possible. If it isn’t possible, hire an experienced birth support doula, who can support you in making the best choices for you and your baby.

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Sam McCulloch Dip CBEd CONTRIBUTOR

Sam McCulloch enjoyed talking so much about birth she decided to become a birth educator and doula, supporting parents in making informed choices about their birth experience. In her spare time she writes novels. She is mother to three beautiful little humans.


18 comments

  1. You know what’s worse than getting handed a dead baby card? Getting handed a real dead baby. This article is ridiculously insensitive to people have lost a child. Nobody should use that phrase. Nobody. Not doctors and certainly not random blogs. Your points can be made with a bit more care and sensitivity.

    1. Due to the feedback, I’ve added a trigger warning at the start of the article. If you have any suggestions on what might make it easier to read, please share your thoughts. The article was reporting on actual language used, and studies on that language being used. I’m not sure how else we can title it without it being unclear, so if you have suggestions I am all ears.

      This article certainly wasn’t written to upset those who experienced a loss. In fact, the writer has been in those exact shoes. She’s written several of our articles on miscarriage and loss, in a beautiful and respectful way.

      Sadly, research has proven this does happen to women in labour. It’s not based on one person’s experience of labour. As a woman, I am sure you agree, no-one should be threatened about having a stillbirth, when there is absoutely no evidence of that happening. Thinking about that for a moment, no matter if you have had a stillbirth or not – isn’t it an appalling way to treat women? It’s offensive, and it does happen.

      Despite her experience, the writer, Sam, also feels passionate about educating women about hurdles they may face and how to empower themselves. Both the writer and myself have been in numerous births where doctors have told the mother to have interventions or have a “dead baby” [their words]. One in my case, the doctor threatened the mother that if she didn’t get a synthetic oxytocin drip up right away, the anaesthetist and doctor on call would have to get up in the middle of the night and try to rescue her baby (this was in a big public teaching hospital, open all hours). The mama was post dates, and diligently came in to have her waters broken to try and start labour. She was told she’d be allowed to have her waters broken and wait. But then she got Dr. McNasty and he had her in floods of tears.

      It’s not necessary or how any mother should remember their labour – and yes, experiencing loss is not a nice way to remember labour either. It sounds like women – no matter what the outcome of the birth – are not getting the care and support they deserve, a lot of the time. It’s hard. But it’s also all the more reason to educate.

  2. Well, my baby died and my doctor never pulled the “dead baby card.” Where does that leave me? I find this article to be irresponsible and negligent on the part of the website. Promoting the idea that a doctor doesn’t have your baby’s best interest at heart a great way to scare new mothers into making decisions base on their “plan” and not based on what’s best for baby. This article disgusts me.

    1. Thank you for your comment, Kati. I am so very sorry for your loss. It’s something I wish no parent ever had to go through.

      This is my response to the concerns about the article:

      Due to the feedback, I’ve added a trigger warning at the start of the article. If you have any suggestions on what might make it easier to read, please share your thoughts. The article was reporting on actual language used, and studies on that language being used. I’m not sure how else we can title it without it being unclear, so if you have suggestions I am all ears.

      This article certainly wasn’t written to upset those who experienced a loss. In fact, the writer has been in those exact shoes. She’s written several of our articles on miscarriage and loss, in a beautiful and respectful way.

      Sadly, research has proven this does happen to women in labour. It’s not based on one person’s experience of labour. As a woman, I am sure you agree, no-one should be threatened about having a stillbirth, when there is absoutely no evidence of that happening. Thinking about that for a moment, no matter if you have had a stillbirth or not – isn’t it an appalling way to treat women? It’s offensive, and it does happen.

      Despite her experience, the writer, Sam, also feels passionate about educating women about hurdles they may face and how to empower themselves. Both the writer and myself have been in numerous births where doctors have told the mother to have interventions or have a “dead baby” [their words]. One in my case, the doctor threatened the mother that if she didn’t get a synthetic oxytocin drip up right away, the anaesthetist and doctor on call would have to get up in the middle of the night and try to rescue her baby (this was in a big public teaching hospital, open all hours). The mama was post dates, and diligently came in to have her waters broken to try and start labour. She was told she’d be allowed to have her waters broken and wait. But then she got Dr. McNasty and he had her in floods of tears.

      It’s not necessary or how any mother should remember their labour – and yes, experiencing loss is not a nice way to remember labour either. It sounds like women – no matter what the outcome of the birth – are not getting the care and support they deserve, a lot of the time. It’s hard. But it’s also all the more reason to educate.

  3. This is absolutely tasteless, insensitive, and unnecessary. I think it’s very rare that doctors are going to “play the dead baby card ” unless there’s a reason. My first baby is dead, because my doctor didn’t take things seriously. As a first-time mom, I didn’t realize the problems we were having could result in a dead baby. I figured being late in the third trimester, that everything would be OK, that my baby would be born alive and he would get to come home from the hospital with us. If somebody had mentioned to me that my baby could die, I would have follow their recommendations. This is the kind of article that’s going to lead somebody to ignore medical advice and potentially lose their child. I cannot believe this was posted. So horrible.

    1. I’m very sorry for your loss Lauren 🙁 So sorry you had to go through what you did.

      This is my response to the concerns about the article:

      Due to the feedback, I’ve added a trigger warning at the start of the article. If you have any suggestions on what might make it easier to read, please share your thoughts. The article was reporting on actual language used, and studies on that language being used. I’m not sure how else we can title it without it being unclear, so if you have suggestions I am all ears.

      This article certainly wasn’t written to upset those who experienced a loss. In fact, the writer has been in those exact shoes. She’s written several of our articles on miscarriage and loss, in a beautiful and respectful way.

      Sadly, research has proven this does happen to women in labour. It’s not based on one person’s experience of labour. As a woman, I am sure you agree, no-one should be threatened about having a stillbirth, when there is absoutely no evidence of that happening. Thinking about that for a moment, no matter if you have had a stillbirth or not – isn’t it an appalling way to treat women? It’s offensive, and it does happen.

      Despite her experience, the writer, Sam, also feels passionate about educating women about hurdles they may face and how to empower themselves. Both the writer and myself have been in numerous births where doctors have told the mother to have interventions or have a “dead baby” [their words]. One in my case, the doctor threatened the mother that if she didn’t get a synthetic oxytocin drip up right away, the anaesthetist and doctor on call would have to get up in the middle of the night and try to rescue her baby (this was in a big public teaching hospital, open all hours). The mama was post dates, and diligently came in to have her waters broken to try and start labour. She was told she’d be allowed to have her waters broken and wait. But then she got Dr. McNasty and he had her in floods of tears.

      It’s not necessary or how any mother should remember their labour – and yes, experiencing loss is not a nice way to remember labour either. It sounds like women – no matter what the outcome of the birth – are not getting the care and support they deserve, a lot of the time. It’s hard. But it’s also all the more reason to educate.

  4. I actually can not believe that I am seeing this article right now! This article angers me and disgusts me like you wouldn’t believe! Whilst I understand that some health care providers do what is more beneficial to themselves, to see an article claiming they use the “dead baby card” sickens me! There are plenty of ways that this could be worded so much better!
    As the mother of a dead baby, I would have jumped at the chance to be induced earlier! If I had not been left to go over my due date my baby would more than likely still be alive!
    I find it so highly offensive that you have so heartlessly published this article with no regard for women who have actually lost their babies.
    I really hope that most women will trust their instincts and listen to their providers rather than this article because I really would hate to see someone lose their baby due to nonsense like this!!! You would be surprised how many stillbirths occur in the last few weeks of pregnancy!!!!

    1. Sorry to hear about your loss, Justine. The writer has lost a baby too. I wish no parent would ever experience the loss of their baby.

      This is my response to the concerns about the article:

      Due to the feedback, I’ve added a trigger warning at the start of the article. If you have any suggestions on what might make it easier to read, please share your thoughts. The article was reporting on actual language used, and studies on that language being used. I’m not sure how else we can title it without it being unclear, so if you have suggestions I am all ears.

      This article certainly wasn’t written to upset those who experienced a loss. In fact, the writer has been in those exact shoes. She’s written several of our articles on miscarriage and loss, in a beautiful and respectful way.

      Sadly, research has proven this does happen to women in labour. It’s not based on one person’s experience of labour. As a woman, I am sure you agree, no-one should be threatened about having a stillbirth, when there is absoutely no evidence of that happening. Thinking about that for a moment, no matter if you have had a stillbirth or not – isn’t it an appalling way to treat women? It’s offensive, and it does happen.

      Despite her experience, the writer, Sam, also feels passionate about educating women about hurdles they may face and how to empower themselves. Both the writer and myself have been in numerous births where doctors have told the mother to have interventions or have a “dead baby” [their words]. One in my case, the doctor threatened the mother that if she didn’t get a synthetic oxytocin drip up right away, the anaesthetist and doctor on call would have to get up in the middle of the night and try to rescue her baby (this was in a big public teaching hospital, open all hours). The mama was post dates, and diligently came in to have her waters broken to try and start labour. She was told she’d be allowed to have her waters broken and wait. But then she got Dr. McNasty and he had her in floods of tears.

      It’s not necessary or how any mother should remember their labour – and yes, experiencing loss is not a nice way to remember labour either. It sounds like women – no matter what the outcome of the birth – are not getting the care and support they deserve, a lot of the time. It’s hard. But it’s also all the more reason to educate.

  5. My OB never warned me about the risks! My son was a stillborn as well.
    This article is poorly written and very insensitive!
    Dead Baby card?? Seriously?

    1. So sorry to hear you experienced a loss Nancy. 🙁

      This is my response to the concerns about the article:

      Due to the feedback, I’ve added a trigger warning at the start of the article. If you have any suggestions on what might make it easier to read, please share your thoughts. The article was reporting on actual language used, and studies on that language being used. I’m not sure how else we can title it without it being unclear, so if you have suggestions I am all ears.

      This article certainly wasn’t written to upset those who experienced a loss. In fact, the writer has been in those exact shoes. She’s written several of our articles on miscarriage and loss, in a beautiful and respectful way.

      Sadly, research has proven this does happen to women in labour. It’s not based on one person’s experience of labour. As a woman, I am sure you agree, no-one should be threatened about having a stillbirth, when there is absoutely no evidence of that happening. Thinking about that for a moment, no matter if you have had a stillbirth or not – isn’t it an appalling way to treat women? It’s offensive, and it does happen.

      Despite her experience, the writer, Sam, also feels passionate about educating women about hurdles they may face and how to empower themselves. Both the writer and myself have been in numerous births where doctors have told the mother to have interventions or have a “dead baby” [their words]. One in my case, the doctor threatened the mother that if she didn’t get a synthetic oxytocin drip up right away, the anaesthetist and doctor on call would have to get up in the middle of the night and try to rescue her baby (this was in a big public teaching hospital, open all hours). The mama was post dates, and diligently came in to have her waters broken to try and start labour. She was told she’d be allowed to have her waters broken and wait. But then she got Dr. McNasty and he had her in floods of tears.

      It’s not necessary or how any mother should remember their labour – and yes, experiencing loss is not a nice way to remember labour either. It sounds like women – no matter what the outcome of the birth – are not getting the care and support they deserve, a lot of the time. It’s hard. But it’s also all the more reason to educate.

  6. I find this article to be flat out insenstive and downright dangeous. You act like nothing can go wrong in pregnancy and doctors are just scaring patients for no reason.
    Let me tell you something not only can things go wrong but when they do doctors often ignore your concerns. My son was stillborn at 24 weeks and 1 day. We do not know the cause of death and we werebtold he was perfect and healthy and yet he died anyways.
    My OB at the time not only flat out ignored me when I voiced concerns about my pregnancy but also refused to send me for a ultrasound until I was 30 weeks as that is the norm. my son died shortly after I went to see her to bad she never used the ‘dead baby card’ in my case maybe he would still be alive.
    Yet your article claims doctors use the dead baby card please explain how I and other women who had stillbirths werent given the care we needed when we suspected something was wrong?

    Perhaps next time you write a article about this you should do some actual research instead of encouraging pregnant women to ignore their doctors . Afterall you never know perhaps the next time a doctor uses the ‘dead baby card’ it may save a childs life.

    1. Tabitha, I am so sorry for your loss. The writer has had one too – it’s all too common and so very sad.

      We’re certainly not telling women to ignore their doctors. Being informed and asking for evidence before agreeing to procedures is very important. And if your doctor isn’t listening to you, we absolutely encourage women to seek a second, third or even fourth opinion if they are worried.

      This is my response to the concerns about the article:

      Due to the feedback, I’ve added a trigger warning at the start of the article. If you have any suggestions on what might make it easier to read, please share your thoughts. The article was reporting on actual language used, and studies on that language being used. I’m not sure how else we can title it without it being unclear, so if you have suggestions I am all ears.

      This article certainly wasn’t written to upset those who experienced a loss. In fact, the writer has been in those exact shoes. She’s written several of our articles on miscarriage and loss, in a beautiful and respectful way.

      Sadly, research has proven this does happen to women in labour. It’s not based on one person’s experience of labour. As a woman, I am sure you agree, no-one should be threatened about having a stillbirth, when there is absoutely no evidence of that happening. Thinking about that for a moment, no matter if you have had a stillbirth or not – isn’t it an appalling way to treat women? It’s offensive, and it does happen.

      Despite her experience, the writer, Sam, also feels passionate about educating women about hurdles they may face and how to empower themselves. Both the writer and myself have been in numerous births where doctors have told the mother to have interventions or have a “dead baby” [their words]. One in my case, the doctor threatened the mother that if she didn’t get a synthetic oxytocin drip up right away, the anaesthetist and doctor on call would have to get up in the middle of the night and try to rescue her baby (this was in a big public teaching hospital, open all hours). The mama was post dates, and diligently came in to have her waters broken to try and start labour. She was told she’d be allowed to have her waters broken and wait. But then she got Dr. McNasty and he had her in floods of tears.

      It’s not necessary or how any mother should remember their labour – and yes, experiencing loss is not a nice way to remember labour either. It sounds like women – no matter what the outcome of the birth – are not getting the care and support they deserve, a lot of the time. It’s hard. But it’s also all the more reason to educate.

  7. As a bereaved mother whose full term baby died at the end of a perfectly healthy and complication-free pregnancy, I have to say the blatant tastelessness of this article is astounding. In the United States alone, 1 in 160 pregnancies ends in stillbirth. This means that, for many parents, “dead babies” are our harrowing reality, not some mythical “card” that malicious medical professionals play to cheat women out of a blissful birth experience. There are ways to write about the support that pregnant women deserve to receive from their care providers without alienating the many mothers who know the heartbreak of stillbirth and infant loss. Shame on the author and shame on this website for publishing such an insensitive and ignorant article.

    1. Vanessa,

      Sorry to hear of your loss, it’s something I wish parents never had to experience. The writer, Sam, has had one too.

      This is my response to the concerns about the article:

      Due to the feedback, I’ve added a trigger warning at the start of the article. If you have any suggestions on what might make it easier to read, please share your thoughts. The article was reporting on actual language used, and studies on that language being used. I’m not sure how else we can title it without it being unclear, so if you have suggestions I am all ears.

      This article certainly wasn’t written to upset those who experienced a loss. In fact, the writer has been in those exact shoes. She’s written several of our articles on miscarriage and loss, in a beautiful and respectful way.

      Sadly, research has proven this does happen to women in labour. It’s not based on one person’s experience of labour. As a woman, I am sure you agree, no-one should be threatened about having a stillbirth, when there is absoutely no evidence of that happening. Thinking about that for a moment, no matter if you have had a stillbirth or not – isn’t it an appalling way to treat women? It’s offensive, and it does happen.

      Despite her experience, the writer, Sam, also feels passionate about educating women about hurdles they may face and how to empower themselves. Both the writer and myself have been in numerous births where doctors have told the mother to have interventions or have a “dead baby” [their words]. One in my case, the doctor threatened the mother that if she didn’t get a synthetic oxytocin drip up right away, the anaesthetist and doctor on call would have to get up in the middle of the night and try to rescue her baby (this was in a big public teaching hospital, open all hours). The mama was post dates, and diligently came in to have her waters broken to try and start labour. She was told she’d be allowed to have her waters broken and wait. But then she got Dr. McNasty and he had her in floods of tears.

      It’s not necessary or how any mother should remember their labour – and yes, experiencing loss is not a nice way to remember labour either. It sounds like women – no matter what the outcome of the birth – are not getting the care and support they deserve, a lot of the time. It’s hard. But it’s also all the more reason to educate.

  8. Your use of the term “dead baby card” is extremely upsetting and out of line. Your readership includes loss parents. Perhaps consider that before you write about dead babies in such a callous and cavalier manner.

    1. Sara, thank you for your comment. I have discussed it with the writer (who has also had a loss).

      This is my response to the concerns about the article:

      Due to the feedback, I’ve added a trigger warning at the start of the article. If you have any suggestions on what might make it easier to read, please share your thoughts. The article was reporting on actual language used, and studies on that language being used. I’m not sure how else we can title it without it being unclear, so if you have suggestions I am all ears.

      This article certainly wasn’t written to upset those who experienced a loss. In fact, the writer has been in those exact shoes. She’s written several of our articles on miscarriage and loss, in a beautiful and respectful way.

      Sadly, research has proven this does happen to women in labour. It’s not based on one person’s experience of labour. As a woman, I am sure you agree, no-one should be threatened about having a stillbirth, when there is absoutely no evidence of that happening. Thinking about that for a moment, no matter if you have had a stillbirth or not – isn’t it an appalling way to treat women? It’s offensive, and it does happen.

      Despite her experience, the writer, Sam, also feels passionate about educating women about hurdles they may face and how to empower themselves. Both the writer and myself have been in numerous births where doctors have told the mother to have interventions or have a “dead baby” [their words]. One in my case, the doctor threatened the mother that if she didn’t get a synthetic oxytocin drip up right away, the anaesthetist and doctor on call would have to get up in the middle of the night and try to rescue her baby (this was in a big public teaching hospital, open all hours). The mama was post dates, and diligently came in to have her waters broken to try and start labour. She was told she’d be allowed to have her waters broken and wait. But then she got Dr. McNasty and he had her in floods of tears.

      It’s not necessary or how any mother should remember their labour – and yes, experiencing loss is not a nice way to remember labour either. It sounds like women – no matter what the outcome of the birth – are not getting the care and support they deserve, a lot of the time. It’s hard. But it’s also all the more reason to educate.

  9. Thank you for this article.
    My OB fed me the “dead baby card” and being a vulnerable, naive, first time mum, I fell for it hook line and sinker. I ended up with a completely unnecessary c-section which left me with permanent nerve damage from the spinal block & PTSD, which left me incapacitated and unable to properly care for my newborn. This experience negatively impacted bonding & my breast milk never came in…not one drop! Yes a healthy baby is the goal, but it seems the health of the mother that must care for the baby goes by the wayside.
    Knowing what I know now, there is no way I would ever trust anything an OB says, ever.

  10. Thank you for this article. I have experienced loss of a baby but I have enough common sense and decency to comprehend that your article is NOT in ANY WAY meant to be insenstive but only to HELP mothers. I have had 6 pregnancys and 4 living children. The Angels I lost has forever changed me. But what also changed me forever is the fact that a doctor was the cause of losing one of my babies. I have severe chronic aniexty, ocd, as well as other disorders. The heartless doctor was more interested in getting paíd for (what I found out later by doctors who are doctors actually trying to do whats right) was a comletely UNNECCESSARY ceasarean. He was so concern with it that he literally sent me into a life threatening anxiety attack. It became life threatening because it triggered other response from my body that lead to a direct result of my baby going into severe distress. He played the “dead baby card” not because he was looking out for my baby but himself. The surgery WAS NOT needed before he emotionally, phychologically, and verbally attacked a laboring woman. My babies distress was a DIRECT RESULT from this spawn of satan that hides under the undeserved label of “doctor”. Whats worse than “dead baby card” is having one from the card being played. Also every single day and night I nearly drown in the sorrow, grief, and anger that im forced to live with that I will never get justice for him essentially causing the death of my baby because he is covered by expensive lawyers an insurance that “legally” allowed this Monster to get by with this. He literally has bought his way out of this. I have lost alot of faith in the court system. Its feels like they are cold hearted with no concern for life lost due to him but only concern for who had the money to buy these scumbag lawyers. I fully believe and know that there are countless doctors who have saved babies and mothers. However, its “astounding” an insenstive to some of us mothers out there whose reality is that there IS malcious doctors out there who have caused deaths of innocent babies and the sickening additional reality is they get by with. My whole world has been shaken like some kind of cruel evil spirted earthquake from hell. If it wasnt for finding peace in God and being humbly thankful for the living children I do have with me, I would even be here on this earth if not for that. Shame on the ignorance and insenstivity of other people who think the only reality is theirs and tasteless opinion that the only heartbreak is people with ONLY their same experiences. So Thank you to the author once again for spreading some light on such realities that mothers such as myself, have to also live each day. Please continue to help inform and empower ALL of us women. God Bless to all.

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