Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 19 to 36 of 43

Thread: staying home in labor - a good idea?

  1. #19

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Margaret River
    Posts
    492

    Default

    hugs to you Danielle

    I can pm you some midwives in QLD if you like

    x


  2. #20

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Southeast Qld
    Posts
    216

    Default

    Thanks Natalie,

    I think I have already found a midwife finder online, I have only found 1 private one in my town though. Could you tell me at all what midwives are allowed to do. They are allowed to do more than a doula huh? It would really put my mind to ease if I had my own medical support at home while I waited to go to hospital. I am really concerned the hospital will only give me so much time then rush me off to theartre, but I also want to be safe for me and my baby also this is why I thought a midwife would be good, because they would be able to tell me when I needed to get to the hospital if something was not going right? I have no idea, I am just guessing. But if a midwife can provide at home medical support then it seems like a good idea to me.

  3. #21

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Margaret River
    Posts
    492

    Default

    yep a midwife can do everything regarding birth...educate, nurture, guide, and if the poo hits the fan, then we are trained to provide best outcomes for mother and baby (a nice way of saying we know what to do in an emergency )

    a doula is a support person for the birthing woman

    the problem with an independent midwife with you in the hospital is they may not have practising rights at the hospital...meaning they can act as your advocate in everything, but cannot care for you clinically

    x

  4. #22

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Southeast Qld
    Posts
    216

    Default

    do you think it would be hard to find a private midwife who is supportive of Vbac? Nobody else in the medical profession seems to want a bar of it, do midwives have knowledge on Vbac's from their training? Or do they have general birthing training which applies to all situations? I am just wondering if midwives would be more excepting of Vbac than the dam doctors?

  5. #23

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Margaret River
    Posts
    492

    Default



    midwives see birth as a natural event that needs no intervention

    doctors see birth as a medical event that most be handled to prevent anything 'bad' happening

    midwives watch, doctors touch

    midwives are certainly more accepting of all types of birth...except anything that puts mother or baby at risk

    a vbac is really not the huge drama that it is made out to be...its just that medical professionals feel the need to put rules and regulations on birth and put you in risk groups. Doctors are trained this way, so they are still nice people

    A private midwife would be your best bet for a vbac, and also look up birthrites on the internet, they have lots of info and have groups in most states

    x

  6. #24
    SamanthaP Guest

    Default

    Hi Danielle,

    Your best chance of having a VBAC will be if you stay home, not just for the labour but the birth as well. There is a really high VBAC failure rate in hospitals because of the way the medical establishment views birth. Every women deserves support and you are clearly not getting it from the system. How we give birth is important for ourselves as women so why don't you reclaim your body and your right to give birth unpressured and in your own time. You can birth beautifully and safely and you don't need to be in a hospital to do so.
    Contact an independent (private) midwife and see what they have to offer you. You won't regret it.

  7. #25

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Southeast Qld
    Posts
    216

    Default

    I am a little worried about staying home to do the whole lot because if something does go wrong the hospital here does not have the facilities to deal with a Vbac situation, therefore I would have to travel an hour away, which is a bit worrying if it were an emergency and I had to get there ASAP. Otherwise I would birth at home, I have never experienced birth yet if I had I wouldnt have a worry doing it at home.

  8. #26

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    In the Country Qld Australia
    Posts
    469

    Default

    Danielle would you be will to travel as far as Kingaroy??? ITs not that far from gympie and they fully support vbac after one c-sec!!!! This is where i had all my vbac's and they are really good. I went 11and a half hours with my first vbac there and they didnt even talk about a c-sec! IF you can't travel there then at least ring and ask to speak to a midwife there to get as much info and help as you can! I have found them brilliant. Good luck and just yell if i can help with anything.

  9. #27

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Southeast Qld
    Posts
    216

    Default

    oh thanks katstribe! My mum used to live at Kingaroy, I know the area very well, I will give them a ring and see what they say, I have heard all awful things about Nambour with Vbacs that they dont really give you much of a chance.

    Gee I thought kingaroy hospital wouldnt have the facilities required for a Vbac incase something went wrong - wow! They look like a small sort of hospital, but I will certainly ring and see what they say!

    Thanks for the idea!!

  10. #28

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    In the Country Qld Australia
    Posts
    469

    Default

    No worries! I know they are a relatively small hospital but they do the births for all our surrounding districts. They had i think just on or just over 500 births in there hospital last year which is huge for a little hospital apparantly the biusiest rural hospital in the state!!!. But the midwives there are fantastic and i know heaps of people apart from myself that have had vbac there with no dramas what so ever!
    Let us know how you get on.
    Cheers
    Kat

  11. #29

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Southeast Qld
    Posts
    216

    Default

    Oh! - heres a question if anyone knows... I was sitting thinking about the things that could happen, bla bla, so I can have some sort of plan or sort of know what to do....

    Apparently alot of women go into labour before their waters break?

    Would it be safe to stay at home and labour if my waters hadn't broken, or should I go to the hospital to have my waters broken?

    Also if I went a while labouring if my waters hadn't broken, could that stress the baby out?

    Just wondering

    thanks!

  12. #30

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Gippsland Vic
    Posts
    1,686

    Default

    Hi Danielle, I have had a natural VB then went on to have a c-section with DS after my waters broke. 12 hours later they induced me and the baby became distressed so I took there advice and had the c-section. When I was pregnant with DD I decided I wanted to go the VBAC way my OB was reluctently supportive, there is only 15 months between babies so he was concerned about the scar. He told me that if I had to be induced, if my labour dragged on for too long he would want to go the C-section. I agreed, I went 2 weeks overdue and went into labour naturally, I stayed at home for a long as DH lol felt comfortable which was a couple of hours, then went to the hospital, I personally was happy to be monitered, mainly because of my concerns about how quickly the previous baby had got into distress, but still made the most of my birth experience. Showered had the large hot birth and the birth attendants that I wanted, after 8 hours of labour my OB was called becayse I had'nt progressed past 8 cm he explained he would break my waters, because we could'nt keep putting pressure on the scar,when the waters were broken there was alot of poo (sorry can't spell the word) in the waters. It was explained that indictated the baby was a bit distressed but we could continue on for the moment. He came back 2 hours later and I was still 8 cms, he tried to reach the baby but was still too far away, so a C-section was advised. Intially I thought about asking if it was really nessecary, but I also believe he gave me the best chance inthe first place. So I went with what I thought was best for the baby as it turned out she was 9pound 10 and had a big groove around her head that went away after a few days, I guess thats where she had been stuck. So I believe that I made the best choice, that I don't think I could deliver her naturally, well at least without major damage to me and maybe her?????

    Anyway I am pregnant again, have seen my OB told him I want to try again if baby is in the right position and everything is going well at the time. He is prepared to support me, the only thing he wants is to do a scan late inthe pregnancy to make sure the baby is not another big one, and I am happy with that.

    I think a midwife, would be a good choice. Have a look in the phone book or have a look around here post requesting one? I live 30 mins from the hospital and took that into account, I think the key is stay home until you feel like you need to go to hospital, maybe stay away from DH as long as possible, given he is already concerned he may have you there before you want to be there. Listen to your body, I guarentee you will now how you are going. Monitering does'nt have to be constant, at hospital but they will want to check on you. There will be someone out there who can help you and if you have info i think you will find your doc will be more likely to support you. One more thing my OB did say he has seen c-section scars that have been paper thin but he has never seen one actually burst, but you do need to know that it does happen, the reason why induction and a very hard long drawn out labour will not be an option. Oh and I can say that I did'nt feel robbed of the chance to birth VB because I gave myself the best chance I could and in the end I was ready to birth my baby the safest way possible. I hope you have gotten some answers and you get the birth you are looking for.

  13. #31
    SamanthaP Guest

    Default

    The best possible thing for your baby Danielle, is to leave the waters intact. They will break of their on accord when ready. They are there for a reason and there is no evidence to support breaking them in a normal labour. Having your waters broken will be more likely to cause the baby (and you) to become distressed so guard them with your life

  14. #32

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Gippsland Vic
    Posts
    1,686

    Default

    If your waters break before you are at hospital, they want you to go straight away, risk of infection!!! But if you have a private midwife, she will be able to advise you on this. if you go into labour without the waters breaking stay home as long as you feel comfortable. The baby will not get stressed, just because your waters have'nt broken.

    I really think a midwife is your best chance, because she will be able to give you the support that you are looking for and enable you to safely stay at home for as long as possible and even whenyou get there if she can't assist she can be you supporte and advise you.

  15. #33

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    South Eastern Suburbs, Vic
    Posts
    6,258

    Default

    Hehe, never mind my randomness, I posted but a million people said what I said, so um...hi everyone!

  16. #34

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    1,814

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SamanthaP View Post
    The best possible thing for your baby Danielle, is to leave the waters intact. They will break of their on accord when ready. They are there for a reason and there is no evidence to support breaking them in a normal labour. Having your waters broken will be more likely to cause the baby (and you) to become distressed so guard them with your life
    Yep. There are two reasons waters are broken by careproviders during labour.
    The first reason is if there is some reason to believe that the baby may be distressed, waters are broken to check if the baby has passed a bowel movement (meconium). Babies who are in genuine distress will sometimes do this and if the waters are broken they will be "meconium stained".

    The second reason (and this is by far the most common) is for nothing more than to "speed" things up. When the waters are broken the theory is that the baby's head comes down further, and applies pressure to the cervix making the contractions more effective at dilating it.
    What they never tell you though is that breaking your water makes it more likely also that your baby will not get into position properly to be born (because once the fluid goes it can't move as easily), and a whole mess of other dramas no one ever tells you about either.

    So as Samantha said, guard them with your life In an undisturbed labour membranes usually rupture on their own around 6-8cm, but can sometimes stay intact through to the birth which is also fine.

  17. #35

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, Australia
    Posts
    8,992

    Default

    There is actually no study to prove that breaking the water speeds things up! As one Ob said to me, 'That's what we think.' !!!

    Also once you break the waters, babies who are in a posterior position seem to have a harder time moving into the right possie for birth and if waters are broken with a high or malpositioned baby (sometimes undiagnosed) then you will be down the path of intervention to get that babe out. Don't think Obs wont break waters with high babies - have heard it a few times now. Cord prolapse is a real problem with that.
    Kelly xx

    Creator of BellyBelly.com.au, doula, writer and mother of three amazing children
    Author of Want To Be A Doula? Everything You Need To Know
    Follow me in 2015 as I go Around The World + Kids!
    Forever grateful to my incredible Mod Team and many wonderful members who have been so supportive since 2003.

  18. #36

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    1,814

    Default

    ^ Happened to me. Waters were broken early in labour with a posterior baby AND a high head. Still can't believe he did it.

    Cochrane review summary on this subject which concluded that breaking water artificially has no benefits and increases risk of fetal distress, prolapse and caesarean: Amniotomy for shortening spontaneous labour

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. The Birth of Molly Jones (now 3)
    By Schmickers in forum Birth Stories
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: December 8th, 2007, 04:36 PM
  2. Miscarriage & Loss - Your Stories and Loss Support
    By BellyBelly in forum Your Stories of Loss
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: July 9th, 2007, 09:08 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •