9 Weeks Pregnant – What To Expect

9 Weeks Pregnant - What To Expect

At 9 weeks pregnant, you might starting to think ahead.

How is life going to change when your baby’s born?

Now is a good time to look into your maternity leave entitlements.

So when you tell your employer the good news, you’re ready to discuss your future maternity leave plan.

You also might want to consider putting a new budget in place now you’re 9 weeks pregnant.

You and your partner will be thankful for the extra money later on, especially if you will be going onto one income for a while.

9 Weeks Pregnant – What To Expect

Typically the first pretnatal testing is done between week 8 and 12.

This might be the first peek you have of your baby.

And you might find it hard to believe something the size of a grape is causing all these changes in you.

You’re still experiencing all the joys of pregnancy hormones.

But rest assured, the first trimester is usually the most turbulent.

Only a few more weeks until the second trimester and a break from the mood swings and frequent urination.

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9 Weeks Pregnant – Your Body

Around 9 weeks pregnant you might be shocked to find your clothes are getting a bit tight around the waist.

Even though you don’t look pregnant, your body is starting to change.

Your uterus is still low but it’s definitely expanding.

You might be worrying about putting on too much weight during pregnancy.

Weight gain at 9 weeks pregnant is normal and expected .

How much weight you gain overall will depend on your starting weight and health.

You want to stay as healthy as possible to prevent problems for your growing baby.

Being a healthy weight can reduce your risk of complications during birth.

But if you’re suffering from pregnancy nausea, it’s likely your losing rather than gaining weight.

Most women find the nausea starts to ease off towards the end of the first trimester.

You might like to try acupuncture to help ease your symptoms.

Unfortunately, some pregnant women find that nothing helps to ease their pregnancy nausea, so it’s more of an endurance race to the end — whenever that is!

On the other hand, those who don’t have any nausea often worry that they’re not really pregnant.

So you can’t win either way, hehe!

When is morning sickness classed as something more serious? Find out about hyperemesis gravidarum.

If you’re suffering from severe pregnancy sickness, don’t hesitate to seek medical advice.

Hyperemesis gravidarum can lead you to become severely dehydrated.

If you can’t keep any fluids down, are losing weight, and have been dizzy or fainted, call your doctor.

You may need treatment in hospital with IV fluids and medication to stop the nausea and vomiting.

9 Weeks Pregnant – Your Baby

Your baby is developing rapidly and looks more like a little person.

In fact, this week your baby is officially no longer classed as an embryo.

In week 9 of pregnancy, your baby is now a fetus, which is Latin for ‘offspring’.

Your baby’s facial features are more distinct now.

Eyes, nose and ears are recognisable.

Baby’s bones and muscle are visible beneath the thin translucent skin.

You might even see baby moving arms and legs at 9 weeks pregnant.

The placenta is now developed enough to take over providing nutrition.

The heart has finished dividing into four chambers and is now developing the valves.

Ovaries or testes are well developed but at this stage it is not yet possible to determine the sex.

When you’re 9 weeks pregnant, your baby will measure approximately 2.3-2.5cm long, weighs almost 2 grams and is about the size of a cherry.

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Last Updated: October 29, 2018

CONTRIBUTOR

Sam McCulloch enjoyed talking so much about birth she decided to become a birth educator and doula, supporting parents in making informed choices about their birth experience. In her spare time she writes novels. She is mother to three beautiful little humans.


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